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Old May 26th, 2012, 08:39 PM   #21
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200th anniversary of the John Pit, Felling mining disaster of 25 May 1812 - the Felling community at Beamish Museum 26/05/12

Below are some photographs (hosted on Photobucket) taken by myself on the afternoon of 26/05/12 concerning the event held to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the event when 92 miners (men and boys) lost their lives when a major explosion happened at the John Pit, Mulberry St, Felling

This event, following that held on 25/05/12 (covered in post above), was at Beamish Museum and involved a lot more of the Felling community marching with pride behind their new banner on a brilliantly hot and sunny day, with the Follonsby banner near the rear









Other events held across the museum site included

Lingey House School choir performing miners songs / film on mining life created by the school

The play "A Monster in the Mine" being performed by Brandling Primary School

Exhibition of the History of Felling area as created by the community

A 2 hour Felling Band session at the bandstand
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Old July 22nd, 2012, 10:56 PM   #22
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This is terribly sad news - a boy killed in an accident at Beamish.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-18947455
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Old August 22nd, 2012, 11:25 AM   #23
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Past pays for Beamish Museum as it plans expansion
by Ruth Lognonne, The Journal, August 22nd 2012


Beamish Museum director Richard Evans demonstrating road repairs 1913-style

THE REGION'S biggest tourist attraction is looking to the past for dramatic future growth after upping its visitor numbers by 200,000 in three years and investing £4m in new attractions. Beamish Museum expects to invest £20m over the next decade, to push its sales up by nearly half in the next five years and take on another 100 staff at the same time.

It attracted a record 497,000 people to its site near Stanley, County Durham, last year, after suffering a lengthy period of stagnating visitor numbers. Three years ago the open-air attraction regularly drew around 300,000 people through its gates, but was struggling to generate enough cash to pay for the rising cost of running the museum. Museum director Richard Evans said that the museum was not making enough money to employ its 175-strong workforce and there was a danger that redundancies would be made if the business did not rapidly change its fortunes.

He said: “We reviewed the business and decided to re-invest much of our earnings which saw the opening of new attractions, including a fish and chip shop in the pit village last year. We also extended our opening season into autumn and winter and re-assessed the value that the ticket presents."


Read More (Two Pages) - http://www.nebusiness.co.uk/business...1140-31670110/
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Old January 7th, 2013, 11:00 AM   #24
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Beamish Museum nears half a million annual visitors
by Neil McKay, The Journal, January 7th 2013



A NORTH EAST MUSEUM is poised to smash the half million visitor barrier for the first time in more than 20 years. It was back in 1990 that more than 500,000 visitors last passed through the gates of Beamish Open Air Museum in County Durham in a single year, but museum bosses are confident that number will be surpassed in this financial year.

Museum spokeswoman Jacki Winstanley said that, depending on the weather during January, the museum was hopeful of topping the 500,000 visitor mark by the end of this month. She explained that the museum’s new financial year begins on February 1, and not April 1 as in many organisations, to avoid a situation where Easter can fall twice within one financial year and not at all in the next, therefore skewing visitor figures.

Museum director Richard Evans, in a report to local councillors who are members of the Beamish Museum Joint Committee, said: “A good start to the Christmas season was reported. Figures showed that the Museum were ahead of budget on visitor numbers for November and they were on track for receiving 500,000 visitors for the year."


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2HHJiLCds
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Old January 26th, 2013, 11:03 AM   #25
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Middlesbrough church rebuilt brick by brick at Beamish
The Journal, January 26th 2013


St Helen's Church, rebuilt at Beamish

A VANDALISED MEDIEVAL church has been resurrected after it was taken apart brick by brick and rebuilt 40 miles away. St Helen’s Church has been painstakingly transported from its former home at Eston, Middlesbrough, and rebuilt at Beamish Museum in County Durham. Each individual brick of the church, which is around 900 years old, was removed from the building and numbered in 1998. It took four labourers a month to dismantle the church and transport it to a site near Georgian Pockerley Manor, owned by the museum.

The blocks were stored on palettes, whilst the remaining rubble of the church was taken by skip. The bricks were kept in a field while Beamish Museum, which funded the project, waited for enough money to become available to complete the move. The decision to transport the church followed years of vandalism, including a fire which destroyed its roofs. The vestry had been illegally demolished while stonework and furnishings, such as the font and medieval cross were stolen. Tudor stained glass was smashed out and in the mid 19th century a cast iron chancel window was taken for scrap.

By 1987 St Helen’s was in a serious state of disrepair and in 1998 Durham County Council and English Heritage gave permission for the grade II listed building to be de-constructed and rebuilt by Beamish.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2J4QGaLrS

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Old January 31st, 2013, 12:17 PM   #26
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'Mr Beamish' in line for national Tourism Superstar Award
by Iain Laing, The Journal, January 31st 2013

Anthony Gales

ANTHONY Gales may look like he lives in the past but he has just been listed as the only North East finalist to be named England’s Tourism Superstar. Gales is described as living and breathing life at Beamish Museum where he is head of operations and his efforts earned him a nomination in the awards for tourism workers who go beyond the call of duty to look after visitors. He lives and works at the museum and he is available at any hour to help visitors. He sets up events, runs the popular winter ice rink and looks after visitors with passion and dedication.

When Anthony heard about his nomination he said: “I do whatever I can to make sure every visitor has a great day out at Beamish. I am responsible for the smooth running of the site, all 300 acres, and from the moment that people arrive to when they head home at the end of the day my team takes care of them,” he said. He was nominated for the Visit England awards by Visit County Durham, the destination management organisation for Durham.


Read More - http://www.nebusiness.co.uk/business...1140-32715067/

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Old February 23rd, 2013, 11:10 AM   #27
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This is a very good article by Sarah Stoner from the Sunderland Echo, --

Sunderland’s First World War heroes remembered with history project BRAVE LINE-UP: The officers of the 160th Wearside Brigade Royal Field Artillery, pictured in 1915.

Published on Tuesday 19 February 2013 15:01


Tributes are being paid to the bravery and sacrifice of Wearsiders during the First World War. Nostalgia writer Sarah Stoner takes a look.


THE fallen heroes of Sunderland are to be remembered with a special tribute. A project investigating life for Wearsiders during the First World War – both on the Western front and at home – culminated in the opening of an exhibition at the weekend.

Pupils from Red House Academy joined forces with Beamish Museum and the DLI Museum in Durham to explore the unique stories of dozens of men who left Sunderland to go to war.

And the results of their four months of investigation and research will go on show at Bede’s Bakehouse, within St Peter’s Church at Monkwearmouth, from noon to 3.30pm on Saturday.

“It is a fascinating exhibition,” said Alex Fairlamb, manager of the Beamish – Your Country Needs You project. “The students have really immersed themselves in the work.

Read more http://www.sunderlandecho.com/commun...ject-1-5426983
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Old February 26th, 2013, 11:18 AM   #28
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Plea to Beamish to save Hexham
railway station's heritage assets

by Paul Tully, The Journal, February 26th 2013


HERITAGE guardians hope two endangered examples of a town’s heritage can be saved and preserved – as museum pieces. Hexham Civic Society is battling to rescue an old stable building and signalman’s bothy from demolition under proposals to convert the goods yard at Hexham railway station into a modern £8m retail site. The plans, agreed by county planners last week, would involve the removal of the “non-designated heritage assets”.

However, HCS is now to ask Beamish Open Air Museum in North West Durham to salvage the buildings. Society chairman Roger Higgins, said yesterday: “Our preference would have been to see the stable building and the signalman’s bothy remain in situ. They lose a lot of their significance when they are no longer in the station yard. But rather than lose the buildings all together, we feel Beamish would be a good home for them.”

HCS trustee Pat Caris has made an initial inquiry to Beamish but with museum curator Jim Rees on holiday no reply has yet been received.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2LzjzmQlS
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Old March 22nd, 2013, 02:01 PM   #29
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This from the Sunderland Echo, --

Historic chamber frozen in time MEETING ROOM: The council chamber before it was taken down.

Published on Thursday 21 March 2013 13:53


IT was at the centre of major decisions which mapped out the future of its towns and villages for more than 80 years.


Now a council chamber has been put in storage as part of plans to recreate the room and preserve it for generations to come.

Desks, chairs, boards and panels detailing the names of its leaders were taken down from the main council Easington District Council building, in Easington Colliery, before demolition experts moved into flatten the site.

Beamish Museum has become the custodian of the furniture and hopes to install it in the town section of the attraction.

Read more http://www.sunderlandecho.com/commun...time-1-5518823
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Old June 20th, 2013, 12:00 AM   #30
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Beamish Museum celebrates historic rail link
The Chronicle, 12th June 2013


Beamish staff and volunteers will be donning Georgian costumes for the 175th anniversary celebrations of the opening of the Newcastle to Carlisle railway line, the oldest coast to coast passenger line in the UK. The festivities have been organised by the Tyne Valley Community Rail Partnership.

On Tuesday 18th June, the Georgian folk will be helping to engage commuters in the story of the line, its historical importance. Celebrations will start with a performance by Hexham Brass, from 10am to 11am, in the concourse of Newcastle Central Station.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...c-rail-4306084
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Old August 8th, 2013, 04:49 PM   #31
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Humble history of South Shields toilet is marked

Courtesy of today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...toilet-5678601

Humble history of South Shields toilet is marked

By Tony Henderson - 8th August 2013



They didn’t count the pennies a century ago when they built seafront public loos in a Tyneside town.

The toilet block in South Shields, built exactly 100 years ago, was no bog-standard effort but instead was given a Tudor-style half timbered look.

Civic chiefs were so proud they included a commemoration stone in the loos which bears the name of the mayor, John Watt Henderson, and mentions the council chairman, borough engineer and the contractors.

Yesterday the current mayor of South Tyneside, Ernest Gibson, celebrated the centenary of the Bents Park conveniences in Sea Road, which now hold the title of the town’s oldest public convenience.

This follows the dismantling of the South Shields Westoe Netty and its rebuilding at Beamish Museum in County Durham.

The Westoe Netty was declared open in 2008 by South Shields artist Bob Olley, who had immortalised the loo in a painting of the same name.

But it has had to be dismantled as visitors continued to use the loo despite signs warning that it had not been plumbed in.

“It was unfortunate but necessary. The signs asked people not to use the loos but they did,” said a Beamish spokeswoman.

“The Westoe Netty is now in storage but we hope to rebuild it in another location at Beamish and this time plumb it in. Toilets like this are part of our heritage.”

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...toilet-5678601
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Old September 9th, 2013, 06:48 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Free Born View Post
One.... the must be many dozens if not hundreds. They are still at today from the old Salvation Army Citadel to the former Freemason's Lodge on Toward Road. The last to go was the old Villiers Inn on Villiers Street and IIRC there are listed building on High Street scheduled for the bulldozer.
had a look into this and, its a shame, but your right. the Freemason lodge was rebuilt at beamish so least some people are trying to preserve some of our old (and interesting) buildings. I'm not for keeping anything thats old but you would think that if something has gone through a process to mark it listed it must therefore have some historical or interesting features worth keeping
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Old September 13th, 2013, 11:48 AM   #33
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TV cook Stacie Stewart opens Beamish Museum's new bakery

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...-opens-5922348

TV cook Stacie Stewart opens Beamish Museum's new bakery
By Kate Proctor - 13th September 2013


Stacie Stewart opens the new Herrons the Bakers at Beamish Museum

Macaroons may be her nemesis but baker and Masterchef star Stacie Stewart has won the battle of the Edwardian kitchen.

The TV cook from Sunderland was guest of honour at the opening of Beamish Museum’s new bakery where she was taught the secret behind the stotty.

In return she treated visitors to a cup-cake demonstration to show how things are done in 2013.

She said: “I love Beamish and I’ve been coming here since I was a kid. I think it’s so important to learn how things were done in the past and the heritage of baking in the North East.

“Family recipes I use might just have one line of description on how to do it so it just shows the level of skill people had.

For me, macaroons are the hardest things to make these days - you need to make friends with your oven.”

Visitors snaked through the attraction’s cobbled streets, lining up to taste the first batch of bread from the new Herron’s Bakery in the Edwardian town.

The building’s fittings came from Annfield Plain in County Durham and the shop was originally part of a parade which included the pit village’s old Co-operative.

A directory found by Beamish staff showed in 1906 there was a Joseph Herron’s bakers listed in the village and that’s where the name was born.

Richard Evans, Museum Director at Beamish, said: “Bakeries back then had a much wider range of goods than we were expecting as bread was made at home. There would be Empire biscuits, ginger breads and cakes - the things that were a bit more difficult to make.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...-opens-5922348
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Old September 20th, 2013, 10:38 PM   #34
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Under-threat Hexham Good Stable Edwardian stables saved

From the BBC News Tyne & Wear site @ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-24173075

Under-threat Hexham Good Stable Edwardian stables saved
20 September 2013 Last updated at 12:50



An Edwardian stables which was due to be flattened to make way for a shopping development has been saved by a museum.

Hexham Goods Stables in Northumberland was the home of horses used to hoist and load goods at the town's railway station early last century.

But because it does not have Grade II protection, Northumberland County Council was going to demolish it.

But now it has been saved by Beamish Museum and will be removed brick by brick and rebuilt in Durham.

Hexham Civic Society (HCS) asked Durham's Beamish Museum to save the building with the help of English Heritage.

It will take engineers and builders several months to carefully take it apart brick by brick and rebuilt it as part of Beamish Museum's Edwardian village.

Beamish Museum recreates what life would have been like during the Georgian, Victorian, and Edwardian times for ordinary people.

A spokesman for Beamish Museum said: "This is part of what we do as a museum. When a building like this is at risk and going to be demolished we can sometimes save it.

"But we literally have to take it down by hand, put it on palates and put it into storage for the day when we will put it back together again."

A HCS spokesman said: "It is a great shame that the building will be lost from Hexham, but it is excellent that they will nonetheless survive at Beamish."
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Old November 18th, 2013, 03:17 PM   #35
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Gateshead homes become slice of social history

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...social-6314196

Gateshead homes become slice of social history
By Kerry Wood - 18th November 2013



Post-war homes for North East families will provide a trip down memory for thousands as they become a slice of social history.

Saved from demolition for posterity these former homes from Gateshead, are to become the building block for the future development at Beamish Museum.

It’s more than a year since the four prefabricated Airey Houses in Kibblesworth escaped the wreaking ball days after being vacated by tenants in Coltspool where they’d stood the test of time as family homes for more than 50 years.

After being painstakingly deconstructed, packed up and transported a few miles down the road to County Durham the vacant homes will once again be filled with people when they form the basis for the new 1950s era at Beamish.

Revealing its plans for the next two years bosses at the museum hope to start on their latest ‘brought to life’ era by 2015.

The houses, which will be open to the public like those already seen in the museum’s Edwardian pit village, will star in a 1950s town along with a cinema, aged miners’ houses, community centre, garage and football pitch.

A spokesman for Beamish said: “The houses were loaded on to pallets and transported to Beamish. Here they have been carefully stored until work begins on a new 1950s area, when they will be rebuilt as part of a typical north eastern post-war urban development.

“These four dwellings had been recently vacated and were due for demolition, when The Gateshead Housing Company offered the whole block to Beamish. The museum was delighted to accept and appointed Compass Developments (NE) Limited to dismantle the houses and transport them to Beamish.

“We got all of the houses safely to Beamish and they’re now waiting, in storage, to be rebuilt in the 1950s area which is part of our long-term development and engagement plan.”

Constructed in large numbers at the end of the Second World War, an Airey house is a prefabricated building often used as a temporary replacement for housing destroyed by bombs. Designed by Sir Edwin Airey they featured a frame of prefabricated reinforced concrete columns covered with a series of concrete panels.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...social-6314196
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Old November 18th, 2013, 03:28 PM   #36
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Gateshead homes become slice of social history
By Kerry Wood - 18th November 2013



It’s more than a year since the four prefabricated Airey Houses in Kibblesworth escaped the wreaking ball days after being vacated by tenants in Coltspool where they’d stood the test of time as family homes for more than 50 years.

Interesting houses 'Prefabs'.

We have a fair bit of information about them on this forum now . . .

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Old January 2nd, 2014, 12:32 PM   #37
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Spainsfield Farm set to go on display at Beamish Museum

Courtesy of today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...isplay-6460551

Spainsfield Farm set to go on display at Beamish Museum

By Kate Proctor - 2nd January 2014


Alan Jopling, with his father Albert, at the remote farmhouse at Spainsfield near Stanhope

Every timber beam, flagstone and nail of Spainsfield Farm at Eastgate in Weardale, County Durham, will be uprooted and trundled painstakingly along the valley to a new rural setting.

Some books, a pair of old leather boots and even a swathe of 1960s lino will make the journey too.

After centuries sitting proud and imposing on a remote hillside, the Jopling family have gifted the building to the museum, and hope that it will give people a true reflection of farming life.

Alan Jopling, 56, said: “They have a farmhouse at Beamish that people look around and they’ll think all farms have these huge houses, but ours is a typical County Durham farm. A little, small house with some byres, not like the big Northumberland ones.

“It was subsistence living up there. There was no running water or electricity. There’s no road and they would have had to have carried water in from a spring.”

Parts of Spainsfield Farm date from the 1700s, with additions made in the 19th and 20th centuries. The Raine family, who still live and work in the valley, owned it for generations before selling the land to Alan’s father Albert Jopling, 83, in the 1970s.

Despite there being no road, it was still lived in sporadically by members of the Raine family up until the late 1960s and particularly at times when bad weather prevented them getting down to the main farmhouse.

John Castling, who is part of Beamish’s Future Leaders Programme, funded by the Arts Council, is part of the team recording the 18th-century farm in its current location before it is moved. Durham University’s geospatial research team are also helping to generate accurate 3D images using laser beams to measure each part of the building.

Mr Castling said: “It’s not on a main road, it’s not even on a minor road, it’s 150 yards down a grassy bank,

“That will be a challenge for us to work out how to get the material back up the bank and off to the Beamish site.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...isplay-6460551
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Old January 11th, 2014, 04:29 PM   #38
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Gateshead tragedy tram returns to the North East for restoration

Courtesy ofd today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...eamish-6497329

Gateshead tragedy tram returns to the North East for restoration
By Tony Henderson - 11th January 2014



A tram involved in a Tyneside tragedy almost a century ago has returned to the region with the aim of once more carrying passengers.

The tram, known as Gateshead 52, has arrived at Beamish Museum in County Durham where it will be restored to working order.

It has been gifted to Beamish by the National Tram Museum in Derbyshire where it eventually ended up after the Gateshead tram system closed in 1951.

The tram started life as No 7 in 1901.

But on the evening of February 5, 1916, No.7 was to be involved in Gateshead Tramway’s blackest day. “While the tramway had the enviable record of never having any passenger fatality, No.7 was to be the cause of the death of four pedestrians that night,” said Beamish keeper of transport and industry Paul Jarman.

The tram was on the steep Bensham Road in Gateshead

On the line ahead was stationary tram on which a fight had broken out.

The driver of that tram had rung his gong to attract attention and summon assistance. No.7’s driver applied his handbrake and walked up the bank to assist, almost immediately noticing the lights of his own tram had disappeared.

An inquest heard that he had applied his brake but not informed the conductress. As he walked up the bank an additional 23 passengers joined the 12 on board.

With this extra weight the brake was overcome and the tram began to run away downhill towards the turn into Saltwell Road. Here, it overturned, killing a family of three and a soldier crossing the road. Ten passengers were injured, three seriously.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...eamish-6497329
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Old January 11th, 2014, 06:04 PM   #39
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Photo of the scene:


Source: http://isee.gateshead.gov.uk/detail....1250&t=objects


View now:

Screenshot courtesy of Google Maps

The building on top of the hill in the first photo is Sydney Grove at the top of Elysium Lane park.



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Old February 13th, 2014, 02:59 PM   #40
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Beamish Museum farm takes a step forward into Second World War era

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-step-6704091

Beamish Museum farm takes a step forward into Second World War era
By Tony Henderson - 13th February 2014


Beamish staff as Land Army girls at the museum's Home Farm

http://i4.thejournal.co.uk/incoming/...15/beamish.jpg

It’s not just the seasons which change on one North East farm – the centuries do too.

Time travel is part of the mix at Home Farm at Beamish Museum in County Durham.

The original farm dates back to the 18th Century when it was part of the estate attached to Beamish Hall.

When the museum took it over, the farm was based in Edwardian times.

Later it was placed in a Victorian setting.

Now it has been projected forward to represent farming in the North East during the Second World War.

On Saturday it will be launched with its 1940s look – a time when agriculture played a vital role as Britain faced the threat of being starved into submission with German U-boats taking a terrible toll on shipping bringing in supplies.

The museum researched what farming was like in wartime with communities across the region, including the flood of evacuees from urban to rural areas and the arrival of Land Army girls to work the fields.

The wartime-look farm now has tractors from the 1940s and 1920s.

The farmhouse has been re-equipped with items and furnishings from the 1930s and 1940s, including a period radio, which in wartime was a crucial source of news and entertainment.

In the kitchen, the farmer’s wife works out how to feed the family and workers with rationing in place. Solutons include dishes such as mock apricot pie, carrot fudge and rabbit pie.

Two farm cottages have been brought into use for the first time, with one being used to house an evacuee family and the other Land Army girls.

The museum already has an Anderson air raid shelter from Crook in County Durham and has installed a pillbox, or guard post, fashioned by the Home Guard from a large colliery boiler, which came from a farm at Belmont in Durham.

There will also be a starring role for Molly, the farm’s huge pig.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-step-6704091
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