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Old June 1st, 2011, 06:09 PM   #1
rockystone
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India - Medical Tourism

Medical tourism attracts NRI's attention to save costs

Bangalore: Soaring medical cost in countries like U.S. has made India the next prominent destination for medical tourism . Millions of NRI plan their medical treatment and surgeries in India to get treated by lower healthcare costs available and at the same time enjoy their recuperative holidays across India.


Medical tourism is a highly expanding sector in India and is expected to experience an annual growth rate of 3O percent, making it a 9,500-crore industry by 2015. NRI's are finding the prospect of international travel for medical care increasingly appealing. With medical tourism one can mix health with pleasure trips just as businessmen merges business with pleasure.

It is estimated that around 150,000 of people travel to India for low-priced healthcare procedures every year. In the year 2008 a survey was conducted by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (Assocham) where it estimated that India is set to earn 80 billion ($1.87 billion) a year in foreign exchange from medical tourism by 2012 and looking at the current influx of NRI coming to India for medical tourism it seems to hold true.

Medical tourism seems to be a superior option for people staying abroad, who are not insured as there is a very high cost of difference in the medical facilities offered in India and abroad. There are also considerable delays in getting treatment in some western countries due to financial and hospital backlogs of patients waiting for medical procedures. In the UK every medical treatment has to be routed via the NHS (National Health Service). Hence one treatment has every chance of getting delayed.

India and Thailand are the two countries who definitely have an edge over its counterparts both in terms of the number of hospitals and the cost advantage. Among the cities, its Delhi who receives highest number of medical tourists as it has better air connectivity; this is followed by Chennai and Hyderabad.

Insurance companies in the United States are now examining the concept of medical tourism and some medical insurance companies are giving their insurer the option of getting medical procedures done abroad. The insurance companies can see the cost savings and no doubt will offer incentives to their insurer to agree to medical procedures abroad since Insurance companies can also save money. Costs of comparable medical procedures in countries like India are far cheaper than western countries even after adding the costs of airfare and accommodation. Hospitals in India sometimes also provide help with visas, travel arrangements and accommodations.

So identify the city and the hospital depending upon the availability of the treatment, the cost and the success rate and also do not forget to check the credentials of the hospital and consultants.
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 09:27 AM   #2
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India favourite medical destination for Omanis


MUSCAT: India is fast emerging as one of the leading medical tourism destinations in the world. This fact was — perhaps — amply demonstrated when US President Barack Obama recently spelled out his aim to change the US healthcare system to discourage Americans from seeking medical treatment in India!
Omani patients, on the other hand, are taking full advantage of India’s emergence as a medical tourism hotspot and are returning happy after receiving treatment in a country which is just a few hours away from here.

Moza Nasser Al Waili, an Omani woman patient of carcinoma, was taken to Max Health Care Hospital in New Delhi early this year by her son Sulaiman Salim Abdullah Al Waili, for treatment. After a month of successful treatment, she was back to Oman.

Says Sulaiman: “She was thoroughly investigated before the surgery was planned. She was rehabilitated for two weeks after the surgery. The treatment went off well. Her health has improved a lot. We are very satisfied with the treatment and all the assistance given through the Medicare Tourism department of Travel Point. We spent RO5,000.”

Such cases of successful and affordable treatment of Omani patients in India abound now. Little wonder that India has emerged as a favourite medical destination
for Omanis.

Zaid Al Siyabi, a senior official at the Department of Treatment Abroad, Ministry of Health, Oman, says that out of 653 patients sent by the ministry for treatment abroad in 2010, 550 patients opted for India.

“Among the other countries we send our patients to include the UK, Germany, Thailand, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Spain, France, Netherlands, and the UAE,” he stated. “Besides the Ministry of Health, other government agencies like the Royal Oman Police, Royal Guard of Oman, Diwan of Royal Court Affairs and a number of private agencies regularly fly patients from Oman to India and other countries for treatment.

According to embassy of India, “a total of 1,018 Omani nationals obtained medical visas from the embassy in 2010, and 778 took medical attendant visas to accompany them during their treatment period in India during the same period.

In the period from January to April 2011, as many as 228 Omani nationals have already obtained medical visas and 189 have obtained medical attendant visas to accompany them.”
A 10 per cent increase in the number of medical visa seekers from Oman to India is expected in the current year as compared to last year.

As one can apply for Indian medical visas throughout the year, the applications are not strictly restricted to the period June to August of any particular year.

Most of the medical visa seekers visit India to have second medical opinion and where needed, for higher grades of surgeries. There has also been a significant increase in the number of visa seekers for infertility treatment in India.

One of the factors behind this trend is that while hospitals in India provide high-quality care, the charges are comparatively less compared to other countries.

Says S. M. Aslam, business development manager at Medicare Tourism: “India is a well known country for Omani citizens in terms of trade and treatment. They are comfortable with the culture and food in India; travelling is easy.

“Besides India, people from the Sultanate prefer Thailand, and opt for Singapore for some specific kinds of treatment. Germany is replacing other European countries as it’s now known to be best in orthopaedic, neurology and cardiac surgeries and is cost-effective too.”

Adds Aslam: “A large number of patients go for orthopaedic (spine scoliosis, total hip replacement, and knee replacement), neurosurgery (brain tumours, Wolf Parkinson Syndrome, nerve disease, cerebral palsy, etc.), cancer treatment (surgical treatment of cancer tumours, chemotherapy and radio therapy, bone marrow transplant, etc.), ophthalmology (laser surgery, retinal detachment, squint correction, etc.), cardiac (all kind of cardiac surgeries), PTCA (electro physiological studies), and rehabilitation cosmetic surgeries and treatment.”

Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, Hyderabad and Pune are the major hubs for standard surgical procedures, contributing about 80 per cent of the total medical tourism revenue. South India, Kerala in particular, gets top billing among those looking for alternative therapies such as Ayurveda.

Among some players in the medical tourism attracting international tourists are Escorts, Wockhardt, Apollo Hospital, Indraprastha hospital, Apollo, Hinduja, Jaslok, Fortis, Max, Sancheti, Arya Vaidya Sala (ayurvedic), Indian Spinal Injuries Centre, Narayana Hurdalaya, etc.

An Indian embassy official sums up: “India is popular among Omani nationals for a variety of reasons like financial affordability, the presence of Asian social milieu, state-of-the-art facilities in major world class hospitals spread all over India, easy air transport connectivity, availability of good banking facilities, proximity to the mainland Oman, and so on.”

The official said that a list of top Indian hospitals imparting world class medical facilities is available in hard copy at the embassy which can be collected from there.
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Old June 9th, 2011, 11:07 PM   #3
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Healthy Business: Will Medical Tourism Be India’s Next Big Industry?

In the past, U.S. President Barack Obama has singled out India for what he sees as the country usurping American jobs and business. In May 2009, he removed some tax incentives for U.S. companies who allegedly preferred to outsource rather than create domestic jobs. "Buffalo before Bangalore" was his rallying call at the time. Now, India is back in his crosshairs. In April 2011, he told a town hall gathering in Virginia that Americans shouldn’t have to go to India or Mexico for “cheap” health care. "I would like you to get it right here in the U.S.," he said.

"It’s a 100% political statement," Gopal Dabade, convener of the All India Drug Action Network, told weekly newsmagazine India Today. Others in India were equally critical and dismissive. But some have taken more serious objection. "Not acceptable," says federal health minister Ghulam Nabi Azad. Affordable health care does not mean our medicine is inferior to any superpower’s. I would like to say our medicines are indigenous, they are superior, and superiority does not come by escalating costs."

The bone of contention is the word "cheap." Obama probably used the term in the sense of less expensive. But Indians have interpreted it as meaning "tawdry and inferior." Analysts don’t expect Obama’s political posturing to make any difference to the flow of U.S. medical tourists into India. But there is a lurking fear, nevertheless, that a nascent sector could be hamstrung at birth.

There Is No Choice

"Patients do not travel to India for health care services because they have a choice and they choose to go to India," says Ravi Aron, professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and a senior fellow at The Mack Center for Technological Innovation at Wharton. "They travel to India because they have no choice." Adds Rana Mehta, executive director, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) India: "If patients see value in what India has to offer, they will continue to come."

Indians feel aggrieved that they have been singled out. In medical tourism, the country is still a bit player. According to a report by the Delhi-based RNCOS, which specializes in Industry intelligence and creative solutions for contemporary business segments, India’s share in the global medical tourism industry will reach around 3% by the end of 2013. The December 2010 report -- titled "Booming Medical Tourism in India" – says that the industry should generate revenues of around US$3 billion by 2013. "The Indian medical tourism industry is currently in its early growth stage," says RNCOS chief executive Shushmul Maheshwari.

Guess who’s the biggest beneficiary of medical tourism? It’s the U.S. "The largest segment, with 40% of all medical travelers, seeks the world’s most advanced technologies," says a McKinsey & Co paper titled "Mapping the market for medical travel." "These men and women take their search for high-quality medical care global, giving little attention to the proximity of potential destinations or the cost of care. Most such patients travel to the U.S." What worries the Indian industry is that this is not the first attack on Indian medical tourism. In August last year, leading medical journal The Lancet had published an article about a new superbug which it called the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1). "The potential of NDM-1 to be a worldwide public health problem is great, and coordinated international surveillance is needed," said the article. Later, a co-author noted that some material had been inserted into the article without his knowledge; the editor of The Lancet had to apologize for naming the bug after New Delhi, and the Indian ministry of health had to weigh in. "The conclusions are loaded with the inference that these resistance genes/organism possibly originated in India and it may not be safe for U.K. patients to opt for surgery in India," said the ministry. "The medical journal's claim is not supported by any scientific data and thus tarnishes the reputation of the country." Rightly or wrongly, the government and many in India’s medical establishment believe that naming the superbug New Delhi was to keep U.K. medical tourists at home. "The superbug certainly garnered a lot of media attention given its name," says Preetha Reddy, managing director of Apollo Hospitals.

It won’t keep medical tourists at home, just as Obama’s appeal is likely to be ignored. "People will always weigh the cost and the benefit," says Reuben Abraham. "If there is a 10% saving and there is a danger of the superbug then chances are that people will not want to take it. But if you are offering an 80% discount, it is a different matter. If India continues to offer high quality health care at one-tenth the cost in the U.S. then these things will not make an impact."

The Next Big Thing

If all this is going to have limited impact, why is India getting so agitated? The answer lies in the potential of medical tourism. It could easily be the next big thing. Unlike business process outsourcing (BPO), which is on the whole very low-tech, health care -- particularly sophisticated procedures -- is very high-tech. India has not been able to set up an adequate health care infrastructure for its own citizens and it doesn’t have the money to do so. Creation of a sophisticated medical tourism structure will have a trickle-down effect.

"India has the highest potential in medical tourism in the world," says Maheshwari of RNCOS. "Factors such as low cost, scale and range of treatments differentiate it from other medical tourism destinations. Moreover, growth in India’s medical tourism market will be a boon for several associated industries, including the hospital industry, the medical equipment industry, and the pharmaceutical industry."His study shows that CAGR (compound annual growth rates) in revenue in 2011-13 will be 26%. In terms of medical tourists, the number would touch 1.3 million by 2013 at a CAGR of 19%. "Medical tourism can be considered one of the rapidly growing industries in the Indian economy on the back of various factors," he says. "However, the industry is at a nascent stage and requires a few years to reach the platform already established by the IT sector." "India has been ranked among the top five destinations for medical tourism," says Rana Kapoor, founder, managing director and CEO of Yes Bank, which has recently done a study on health and wellness tourism in India along with apex chamber of commerce FICCI. The ranking by Nuwire Investors, an online source for news on alternative investments, puts Panama on top, followed by Brazil, Malaysia and Costa Rica. "India is looking at exponential growth as far as tourism is concerned," continues Kapoor. "Yes Bank forecasts that there will be an increase in domestic tourist movements over the period (2008-2020) by 118% and foreign tourist inflows over the same period will increase by 71.87%. What the potential for medical tourism from within this growth rate of 71.87% will be depends upon government policies, faith of the patients and many other external factors. We truly believe that this sector will play a significant role as a contributor towards the overall tourism growth in India."

"I strongly believe that many developments across the world will put India in a fantastic position," says Devi Shetty, cardiac surgeon and chairman of Narayana Hrudayalaya. "We produce the largest number of doctors, nurses and medical technicians in the world. Also, we have been traditionally linked with western health care because of the British influence on our medical education and the ability to speak English. This is extremely important for developing [global] health care. Our greatest asset is our ability to produce the largest number of technically-skilled individuals. We also have the largest number of USFDA (U.S. Food and Drugs Administration)-approved drug manufacturing units outside the U.S."

Other Markets Will Turn to India

"India’s potential is huge," says Mehta of PwC. "Some 80% of foreign patients coming to India are from the neighboring countries and from Iraq, Afghanistan, the former Soviet Union, etc and now increasingly from Africa. But now with India proving itself as a credible provider of value health care, the western population ageing, and health care becoming more difficult there, I expect more people to come from the U.S. and the U.K."

Mehta says that some things went wrong with the earlier planning. "We expected most patients to come from the U.S. and Europe. We expected people to come for cosmetic and regenerative treatment and this is where there is more potential for tourism. But the majority actually came for cardiac treatment, cancer treatment, knee replacement and other serious ailments. Therefore, tourism was not really of importance. We did not get the cost factor right. We thought that typically in India it costs one-tenth of that in the U.S., so we could cost at 5X. But hospitals have not been able to charge very much. At present, with a foreign patient, there is around 20% more earning."

Cost is, of course, being underplayed in the marketing efforts; this is why the word "cheap" rankles. "The patient is usually acutely aware of the difference in the sticker price for care," says Aron. "There is no reason to draw attention to this.”That’s an area where India enjoys an advantage over other countries too. According to the BusinessWorld report, a heart bypass surgery costs US$144,000 in the U.S., US$25,000 in Costa Rice, US$24,000 in Thailand, US$20,000 in Mexico, US$13,500 in Singapore, and US$8,500 in India. "The quality is excellent," says Maheshwari. In India, there is also less waiting time and personalized services.

Becoming an Industry

Medical tourism is also taking shape as an industry, though there are some who feel that it will eventually fall in many buckets. (The recent FICCI-Yes Bank study talks of wellness tourism, health tourism...) "There are over 3,371 hospitals and around 750,000 registered medical practitioners," says Maheshwari.

Shetty says it is easier to get loans these days. "Earlier, it was difficult for us to mobilize huge financial support to create large hospitals. However, things have changed now," he explains. Indian companies are also taking over hospital chains in Asia -- Fortis has gone on a shopping spree, though it’s not been entirely successful -- and setting up front-ends in other countries for marketing purposes. Apollo has facilitation centers in Oman, Nigeria and the U.S. Max is present in Nigeria, Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Nepal. Says Reddy of Apollo: "There are several key players. Apollo Hospitals continues to attract the largest numbers of international patients followed by Max, Fortis and Workhardt."

"Another opportunity that Indian operators are now seeing is that you don’t have to offer these health care services from India," says Abraham of ISB. "For instance you can offer it from say, Cayman Islands or the Bahamas. Ultimately, the innovation is in the process and as long as you can bring the same process innovation, even if the cost goes up a little as compared to offering it from India, it will still be a substantial saving for the patient."

This is one area where China is no threat. Foreigners in China still rush to Hong Kong when they need treatment because they cannot communicate with local doctors.

But what the budding sector will have to contend with is the Indian government. Take one example. With the intention of making things smoother, the government introduced a medical visa (M visa), which was faster and easier to get. In its wisdom, however, it added a peculiar clause -- "Foreigners coming on M visa will be required to get themselves registered mandatorily well within the period of 14 days of arrival with the concerned Foreigners Regional Registration Office." The end result: even patients who have to be carried into India on stretchers are coming on tourist visas. If the government wants medical tourism to be the next big thing, it has to put its house in order.

As for the immediate controversies, Shetty is very clear. "President Obama’s statement or the New Delhi superbug will not affect medical tourism development in India," he says. "First of all, he was not criticizing India. He was just trying to put his house in order."
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Old June 9th, 2011, 11:18 PM   #4
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Please post the sources for all the articles!
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Old June 13th, 2011, 10:27 PM   #5
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Tanzanians throng city hospital for treatment

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...ow/8842741.cms

A public health officer with Tanzanian government, 37-year-old Mathiar Muhochi had lost all hopes of a normal life for his daughter.

Mathiar's daughter Eliot, 13, had met with a car accident last year and sustained severe injuries near her right eye. Plastic surgeries in Tanzania could not help Eliot.

But to Eliot and many such patients from Tanzania suffering from different ailments, Ahmedabad has given a new hope.

"A batch of 21 patients, including infants to 50-year-olds and their family members are here. This is the first time that we have patients in a large batch from a foreign country and this could well be a new chapter of medical tourism in Gujarat," said Dr Praful Pawar, CEO, Apollo Hospitals, Ahmedabad.

"I had heard about Indian medical facilities from a friend who said that India is a booming economy and technological advancement is 10 times higher than Tanzania. I later Googled information about hospitals and facilities in India and came to know about Apollo from the internet," said Mathiar.

Accompanied by Dr Jennifer Raymond of Tanzania, most of the patients have come to Ahmedabad for cardiac surgeries. "Back in Tanzania cardiac surgeries are not possible. India is much more advanced," says Raymond. Apollo Hospital has recently signed an MOU for medical tourism with Tanzanian government and the 21 patients here are the first batch to come to India under the same.

For Saada Matity, who works with a bank in Tanzania, the agreement has come as blessing in disguise. Her four-and-halfmonth daughter Cayla has cardiac problems. Like Matity, there are several other mothers who have brought their little ones to Apollo for cardiac treatments.
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Old June 17th, 2011, 12:48 PM   #6
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Research and Markets: Medical Tourism in India - Medical Tourism in India Can Contribute Rs. 50 To 100 Bn Additional Revenue For Up Market Tertiary Hospitals By 2012

source http://www.businesswire.com/news/hom...ndia---Medical

-Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/re...cal_tourism_in) has announced the addition of the "Medical Tourism in India" report to their offering.

This report covers the Indian Medical tourism market. India with advanced medical services paired with exotic natural bounties has become a heaven for medical tourists. The medical tourism industry in India is all set to be the next big success story after software in India. According to the prediction of the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and McKinsey, the industry will grow to earn additional revenue of $2.3 billion by 2012.

Medical tourism in India can contribute Rs. 50 to 100 bn additional revenue for up market tertiary hospitals by 2012, and will account for 3-5 percent of the total healthcare delivery market, says the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)-McKinsey study on healthcare. The Indian medical tourism industry, growing at an annual rate of 30 percent, caters to patients chiefly from the US, Europe, West Asia and Africa. Although in its nascent stage, the industry is outsmarting similar industries of other countries such as Greece, South Africa, Jordan, Malaysia, Philippines and Singapore.

Scope:

Market size and share data for Medical Tourism Market in India.
Revenues trends' analysis for the Indian Medical Tourism Market.
Major areas of focus considered for the study include Heart Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Holistic Well Being,Cosmetic Surgery, Beauty Treatments, Spa Treatments and IVF Treatment.

Key players covered include The Taj, Leela Group, The Oberoi, ITC, AIIMS, Fortis Hospitals, Apollo Healthcare, Tata Memorial Hospital, Manipal Group, Narayana Hrudalaya, Sahara Hospital, Kuoni, Cox & Kings,and Thomas Cook.
Future forecasts till the year 2012 has been done for the market under study.

Key Benefits:


Exploit growth opportunities across various market segments within the medical tourism industry in India.
Devise market-entry and expansion strategies for different types of medical tourism market services.
Understand the forces operating in the Market.
Devise product, sales and marketing strategies from the in depth SWOT and PEST analyses.
Identify key growth markets for your products from the region wise stability and demand data.
What is the future demand potential of this sector - Identify, understand and capitalize.
Develop business strategies by understanding the trends and developments that are driving the business forces in the Indian rubber market.
Make informed business decisions using the insightful and in-depth analysis of the report.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 10:56 PM   #7
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It is anticipated that soaring health costs in the US coupled with a reform in US healthcare policy will drive an increasing number of Americans to look outside the US for healthcare. The Cayman Islands, just an hour or so flight away from Miami, is perfectly poised geographically to embrace the concept of medical tourism. World renowned cardiologist Dr. Devi Shetty’s proposed Narayana Cayman University Medical Center is set to assist the Islands in developing medical tourism as a crucial third leg to its beleaguered economy. Business Editor Lindsey Turnbull reports.

http://www.compasscayman.com/journal...onomic-pillar/

Also posted in the India abroad thread

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Old June 19th, 2011, 11:04 PM   #8
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Also posted in the India abroad thread

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Old July 3rd, 2011, 09:06 PM   #9
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India promotes health tourism

http://www.telegraphindia.com/111070...y_14190652.jsp

India is promoting health tourism abroad in a big way.

The tourism ministry has kicked off road shows abroad to promote the homegrown health industry, which has an annual growth of 35 per cent.

According to ministry officials, more people are flocking the country for cheaper and good medical services and the numbers have increased drastically over the years.

Official records show more than 63,000 foreign tourists have arrived from Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, Pakistan, Denmark and the US for surgeries and treatments this year.

“In India, medical facilities are far cheaper and way more advanced than in many countries. This has attracted a lot of people. We just want to take this a step further and promote it through our road shows. Health tourism is attracting more people than summer vacationers from all over the world,” said a senior bureaucrat with the tourism ministry.

Ministry officials estimate a 35 per cent increase in the number of people coming to India for treatments starting from dental surgeries to knee transplants and neurosurgery. India has also emerged as a major destination for cosmetic surgery.

In the past three years, the health sector has faced stiff competition from Singapore and Malaysia, which are offering high-end health solutions at competitive prices.

“We plan to reach out to more people through our road shows,” said the official.

He added the ministry expected a minimum of 85,000 to 1 lakh people coming to India this year for treatments.

The road shows will comprise presentations and one-to one business meetings between trade delegations from India and travel trade representatives in the respective countries.

“While road shows were carried out in the US and Caribbean countries in the first week of this month, similar shows were held last month in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam,” said the ministry official.

At present, Indian destinations are being showcased in Manchester, Birmingham, Durban and Glasgow in England.
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Old July 7th, 2011, 10:00 AM   #10
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Kerala, now health's own country

World class hospitals, cost-effective treatment and ample opportunities to relax in the scenic landscape of 'God's own country' -- medical tourism promises to be the next big money spinner in Kerala, with a steady stream of overseas patients flocking to the state.

The few nationally and internationally accredited hospitals in the state are doing brisk business, with foreign nationals making a beeline for procedures like knee replacement, weight reduction surgery, liver transplant, cardiac care, ophthalmic care and dentistry.

Most of the foreign patients are from Canada, the Gulf countries, the Maldives and many are also second generation Malayalis settled in the US and Britain.

While there are no official state-wide figures, E.M. Najeeb, founder of KIMS Hospital here, says the institute treated around 40,000 overseas patients last year.

"International insurance companies look for international accreditation if they have to pay their clients, and hospitals interested to get favourable treatment from giant insurance companies have to meet international standards in providing quality healthcare," said Najeeb.

In terms of expenditure, a knee replacement in Kerala costs Rs.2.5 lakh ($5,600), less than half of what it would cost in the US or Europe.

Similarly, a liver transplant here can be done at a cost of Rs.1.5 million ($33,700), while in the West, a patient has to shell out anywhere above Rs.7 million ($157,000).

Speaking to IANS, Tourism Minister A.P. Anil Kumar said Kerala has the potential to cash in on the twin benefits of cost and quality.

"One main reason why we are getting a huge number of foreign nationals, mostly from the Middle East, is because our own people act as ambassadors of our hospitals in the Middle East. I have just become the tourism minister and we will promote medical tourism in a big way abroad," he said.

S. Sudhindran, a surgeon with Kochi-based Amrita Hospital, has treated many liver transplant patients from abroad.

The hospital treated around 10,000 foreign patients last year.

"Yes, the response from abroad has been good. The state government also has to do its bit by framing rules that will help foreign nationals have a smooth stay and not get caught in numerous paper works," he said.

According to Ashley Jacob, medical director of Mulamoottil Eye Hospital in central Kerala, eye care is all set to become a key revenue earner for the flourishing medical tourism industry.

"The totally blade-free LASIK (Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomileusis) surgery costs Rs.60,000 here and Rs.85,000 in Bangalore. The same procedure will cost $2,200 (Rs.97,000) in the US and 1,500 pounds (Rs.100,000) in the UK," said Jacob.

Jancy Joseph, who has been running a private dental clinic in the state capital for 15 years, gets a steady stream of foreign patients, mostly from the West and Middle East.

"Most of my non-resident patients are referred here by their friends and relatives in India. They have told me that dentistry rates in the West are 10 times higher, compared to here," said Joseph.

John Muthoot, who owns two plush resorts in the state, said he has decided to venture into the medical tourism industry to cash in on the trend.

"Our first venture into the medical field is through a 50-bed hospital coming up in Kottayam. Medical tourism is one segment which we are keen to tap because we already in the tourism industry, and thus have a huge clientele," said Muthoot.

There has been an 18 percent growth in the arrival of foreign tourists in Kerala, with the numbers touching 659,265 last year.

http://mangalorean.com/news.php?news...&newsid=249757
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Old July 8th, 2011, 10:16 PM   #11
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Research and Markets: Asian Medical Tourism Analysis (2008-2012)

http://www.businesswire.com/news/hom...ysis-2008-2012

Medical tourism is the new buzzword in the tourism industry around the globe as it helps in enhancing the revenue portfolio of various other associated sectors. Medical tourism has emerged as one of the fastest growing segments of the Asian tourism industry. The cost of medical treatments in developed countries, particularly in the US and the UK, has been significantly high, which has prompted the patients from these regions to visit cost effective destinations. Moreover, growth in wellness tourism in Asian countries is supporting the medical tourism industry. Presently, although medical tourism in the region is at its nascent stage, it holds enormous potential for future growth and development.

As per this new research report Asian Medical Tourism Analysis (2008-2012), the Asian medical tourism industry revenue is projected to grow at a CAGR of over 20% during 2010-2013. Asian countries, such as India, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand have been pouring investments into their healthcare infrastructure to meet the demand for supreme quality-assured medical care through first-class facilities and highly trained medical specialists, including tertiary hospital care.

The Asian medical tourism industry has been growing at a double-digit growth rate for the past few years. Thailand, India, and Singapore dominated the region's medical tourism industry, with a combined market share of over 89% in 2010. However, this research foresees India to emerge as one of the fastest growing medical tourism industries, accounting for around 38% of the region's medical tourism industry by 2013.
In this regard, BMI have done an in-depth analysis of key factors driving growth in the country's medical tourism industry.

Asian Medical Tourism Analysis (2008-2012) provides comprehensive research and unbiased analysis of the current market performance and future outlook of the key Asian medical tourism markets - Thailand, Singapore, India, Malaysia, the Philippines, and South Korea. It acknowledges the fact that, the six Asian markets covered in the report have vast differences in terms of cost, infrastructure, human resources, patient perceptions, competencies, and level of government support. Each of the fact has been thoroughly studied in the report. The report provides valuable information to clients looking to venture into these markets and helps them in devising strategies.
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Old August 5th, 2011, 01:37 PM   #12
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Old August 8th, 2011, 09:00 PM   #13
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Sonia Gandhi's Surgery Blow To Medical Tourism in India

Sonia Gandhi's surgery in United States is a big blow for Medical tourism in India. It has started to raise questions that although medical treatment in India is cheap but it can't match the quality of United States.
The decision of Sonia Gandhi to opt for US hospital for treatment has also came as a huge surprise for Medical Association in India. It raises questions on the claim made by medical experts that India is not only a cheap medical destination but also provides world class treatment.

But questions will be raised when President of ruling Congress party of India and a Gandhi family member decides to go abroad for treatment. Already several experts in United States and Europe have started to take dig at the India's medical tourism industry.

Ideally Sonia Gandhi should have opted for an Indian hospital. Big personalities in India like Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Bollywood superstar Shahrukh Khan and Amitabh Bachchan, all went through critical surgery in India successfully. Medical Association in India praised these personalities for showing faith and reaffirming the fact that doctors and medical facilities in India are of World Class.

A large number of medical tourists opt for treatment abroad not because its cheap but because of quality. India also receives majority of medical tourists from neighboring Asian countries as well from Africa who travel here for good services and being relatively close to their country.
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Old August 26th, 2011, 11:34 PM   #14
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Medical tourism in India Cheaper & Better than the west

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Old September 25th, 2011, 10:58 PM   #15
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Fortis eyes 10% revenue from medical tourism in 3 years

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/10113619.cms

Leading corporate hospital chain Fortis Healthcare is looking at garnering 10 percent of its revenues from the lucrative medical tourism over the next three years, a top official said.

"I would expect that it will be in higher single digits or 10 percent," Fortis Chief Executive, domestic operations, Aditya Vij told PTI here when asked about the company's plans for medical tourism.

Vij said that medical tourism at present constitutes 7 percent of the revenues of the billionaire brothers Malvinder and Shivinder Singh-promoted company.

He stressed that the share of medical tourism will increase even as it targets to continue to grow at 30 percent annually during the next three years.

Medical tourism typically denotes serving overseas patients looking for cheaper treatment options or better infrastructure. Factors like the falling rupee observed recently are bound to make the business more profitable.

Vij said apart from the developed countries, Fortis will be looking at getting patients from Afghanistan, the Middle East and Africa.

However, he added that though the revenue share from medical tourism will go up, the company's focus will be the domestic market.

The company, which recently announced its plans to open hospitals in tier II and III cities, is targeting to commission the first of the low-cost hospitals in early next year and will be finishing with its planned rollout in 25 cities in the next three years, he said.

"The idea is to take medical care to where people are. We want to bring healthcare to more and more people who today have to commute long distances to get decent medical care. We already have identified a few locations," he said.

At present, Fortis has 51 operational hospitals spread across the country while 15 more are under construction. Once the construction is complete, its capacity will go up to 10,600 beds.

Vij said the company is always scouting for acquisitions and will continue to look at such options for growth.

The company's vision is to adopt an asset-light approach and Fortis will be looking at partnerships with those having real estate, Vij said.

It will tie-up with the real estate owner, build a hospital and run it, he explained, stating that such a model will be especially helpful in its tier-II and tier-III foray.
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Old September 26th, 2011, 11:31 AM   #16
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Kochi the hub of Medical tourism

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Originally Posted by mohammedirshad06 View Post
With Kochi set to witness a boom in the hospitality sector in the next couple of years, five-star hospitals seem to be getting one-up on five-star hotels.
There are already over five multi-specialty hospitals in and around the city. Besides this, two more are coming up.


Fortis Healthcare (India) Ltd has announced the launch of four hospitals, including one in Kochi, and the DM [email protected] is coming up at Cheranelloor.

The Kerala Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS) opened its multi-speciality hospital at Kalamassery here in June with the latest facilities to exploit the potential for medical tourism.

Kochi has already become a centre for medical tourism with several hospitals springing up in the last few years to meet the demand.

Fortis marks its entry into Kerala with a 45-bed boutique hospital in Kochi, which will offer quality healthcare for women under ‘Fortis La Femme’ brand.

DM Healthcare’s [email protected], claimed to be the first medi-city in Kerala, is coming up at Cheranelloor. “The work on the project is expected to be completed and the hospital opened by the end of 2013,” said DM Healthcare authorities.

The project Medcity would be set up on an area of one million square feet with a built-up area of about 2.5 million square feet.

“It will have a large 500-bed anchor hospital as the fulcrum with about 10 smaller hospitals of 100 to 200 beds for individual specialties. [email protected] will be a conglomeration of multi-super specialties led by renowned medical practitioners from across the globe.Patients from the West Asia, Europe and USA are expected to make use of this facility due to major cost advantages,” they said.

http://ibnlive.in.com/news/kochi-set...88-60-122.html
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Old September 27th, 2011, 12:11 AM   #17
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Oh good lord. Though all these medical tourism and medical boom sounds exciting, the fact of the matter is that medicine and healthcare is being highly commercialized in our country, making it much more difficult for nearly 60-70% of our population to get guaranteed quality healthcare at a nominal price. What an irony, that the so called medicine talents of India are of significant help only to the incoming medical tourists and not to the local population.

And we the educated, well earning middle class, upper middle class and the upper class, fail to recognize this and are only content and excited with the medical tourism.

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Old September 28th, 2011, 08:00 AM   #18
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Coming up- Kochi Medical City



A group of Indian investors including a doctor and a businessman from Qatar, and legendary cricketer Kapil Dev has unveiled plans to launch a Rs10bn healthcare project in Kerala.




Mohan Thomas, a leading ENT doctor and Hassan Kunhi, a well-known community member and entrepreneur were among the promoters of the proposed Kochi Medical City who met Kerala Chief Minister Oommen Chandy yesterday in the state capital Thiruvananthapuram seeking his support.
The chief minister assured the delegation that the government would consider the proposal for the super speciality health project for allopathic and Ayurvedic treatments of international standards, both in quality and facilities.
The project also proposes to provide medical education in various disciplines. It will also create large water lagoons for encouraging fish farming, a park and a forest to encourage breeding of birds and butterflies.

It aims to become one of the top 10 healthcare destinations in the world, a spokesman said.

The promoters hope to attract patients from other Indian states as well as international medical tourists with quality healthcare facilities. It will employ 7,000 professionals and create nearly 25,000 indirect jobs.

The promoters say India lags far behind in attracting medical tourists due to lack of quality infrastructure despite a large pool of healthcare professionals. The present international market is worth about $10bn while India’s contribution is only 1%.

The project envisages setting up a 1,000-bed hospital offering modern medical treatment, a 50-bed Ayurveda hospital, a medical convention centre and a medical research centre which will focus on creating new treatment modalities that are more effective than those currently in place, the spokesman said.

There will be dental and paramedical institutions as well in the campus. In addition, medical and pharmaceutical companies will be provided office spaces so that they can come under one consolidated wing and this makes it easy for their research and marketing.

The project is expected to attract Indian doctors and technocrats settled abroad to relocate and encourage a reverse brain drain.

The former Indian cricket captain is a director of the Medical City while Dr Thomas is the chairman and Kunhi the managing director.

Others who attended the meeting were Mathew Francis, Jay V Jagannadhan, Mibu Jose, Industries Minister P K Kunhalikutty, Norka Minister K C Joseph, Ports Minister K Babu and Agriculture Minister K P Mohananan.

http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topic...6&parent_id=16
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Old October 4th, 2011, 03:16 PM   #19
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Develop multi-speciality health city in Bangalore to tap medical tourism: Assocham

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/10157387.cms



Industry body Assocham today called for developing multi-speciality health city here, based on a public-private-partnership model, to tap into medical tourism potential in the state.

The proposal envisages various super-speciality hospitals for patients seeking treatment of international standards by highly trained, English-speaking healthcare professionals at affordable prices, Assocham said in a statement.

The idea aims at making the city, and eventually entire Karnataka, a global medical-tourism centre.

As per an Assocham study, 'Emerging Trends In Domestic Medical Tourism Sector', the inflow of medical tourists in India is growing at a compounded annual growth rate of 40 per cent and is likely to cross 32 lakh by 2015 from the current level of 8.5 lakh.

Indian medical tourism industry is currently poised at around Rs 4,500 crore and is likely to be worth Rs 10,800 crore by 2015, it said.


Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, West Bengal and Delhi are fast emerging as India's best medical centres with several hospitals and speciality clinics are coming up in and around the prominent cities.

Assocham Secretary General D S Rawat said people visit India from across the world for face-lifts, dental treatment, botox treatment, tummy tucks, eye care and other such medical services at hospitals, treatment centres offering modern medical facilities.

The Bangalore concept envisages several hospitals and speciality clinics including research and rehabilitation centres, pharmaceutical clinics and spas with furnished apartments, villas and star-rated hotels including shopping malls and complexes. Various support services like metro rail, mono railway network and bus rapid transit system are also included as part of infrastructure.

"This will not only help Karnataka secure a bigger share in India's lucrative medical tourism industry but will encourage reverse brain drain by attracting non-resident Indian doctors, experts settled abroad to participate in this venture," said Ravindra Sanareddy, Chairperson of Assocham Southern Council.

The state government may rope in various embassies, high commissions to get support of health ministries in foreign countries and promote medical tourism aggressively, he said.

Besides, the state government should provide financial and fiscal incentives to the healthcare industry capable of creating large number of jobs and earning foreign exchange, he added.
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Old October 11th, 2011, 08:12 AM   #20
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Hey RockyStone,

Fully agree with your views. The main reasons for growing Medical Tourism in developing countries are due to High Cost and Long waiting list in US Hospitals.

But countries like India, Mexico and Costa Rica need to improve the basic infrastructure of the Hospitals. Although it has been improved a lot but there is still lot needs to be done.

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