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Old December 14th, 2005, 09:37 PM   #41
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IIT to start 'IP School'

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...s/14141306.htm
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Old December 16th, 2005, 11:03 PM   #42
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EDUSAT project cleared for Madurai Kendriya Vidyalaya

The Kendriya Vidyalaya in Madurai has been identified for installing the EDUSAT (Educational Satellite) facility soon and steps have been initiated to establish the technical infrastructure required for the purpose.

http://www.hindu.com/2005/12/17/stor...1701200200.htm
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Old December 16th, 2005, 11:12 PM   #43
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Samsung, United Way to set up school

The total project cost is estimated at $4,00,000. Foundation for the `Samsung United Way School' (SUWS), to be set up on a two-acre site, was laid on Friday. It will begin functioning from January 1, 2006 and, in the first year, will benefit 250 children.

http://www.hindu.com/2005/12/17/stor...1707730500.htm
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Old December 19th, 2005, 03:33 AM   #44
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SRM institute signs agreement with Korean university

CHENNAI: The SRM Institute of Science and Technology (SRMIST), a Deemed University, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Youngsan University of Korea that provides for academic collaboration, including faculty and student exchange, besides joint research programmes.

The SRMIST's Vice-Chancellor, P. Sathyanarayanan, and the Youngsan University's President, Guwuck Bu, signed the MoU on Friday.

The agreement would be in force for five years and extended for another five-year period, Mr. Sathyanarayanan told newspersons later.

Mr. Sathyanarayanan and the university's director (Research and Virtual Education), M. Ponnavaikko, said information technology and hotel management and catering management were two focal areas in which the collaboration would begin.


http://www.hindu.com/2005/12/19/stor...1904430200.htm

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Old December 19th, 2005, 03:43 AM   #45
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JNTU exams go hi-tech

An examination that gives results immediately and also evaluates the mistakes committed is going to be a reality with the introduction of online examination system by the Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University (JNTU), the first one to do so in the country.

Engineering students of 240-odd colleges affiliated to the JNTU now don't have to go through the age-old tradition of writing the examinations.

They will simply click the mouse and after the scheduled time the result will be flashed on the screen along with the mistakes committed and also solutions for the wrongly answered questions. "Online system is being introduced for internal assessment of marks as of now and its extension to other exams depends on the feedback," says JNTU Vice Chancellor K. Rajagopal.

Question bank


The university has created a question bank for each subject designed by subject experts. The student just needs to get onto the system at the college and key in the hall-ticket number. The computer randomly picks 20 questions with four choices of answers for each question.

After the specified time the question page automatically vanishes and then within minutes the score sheet appears along with the correct answers.

The designed software ensures that no two students get the same question paper. "The score is also recorded immediately at the central server thus negating any chances of mischief," says K. Vijaykumar Reddy, Controller of Examinations.

The system that comes into effect from this year has inherent advantages to plug leakage of question papers, bias and effective monitoring of the conduct of internal examinations by its large pool of affiliated engineering colleges. "Colleges that give marks without conducting the test cannot tamper with the system now," says Dr. Reddy.

It will also be ensured that standard of questions is same for all students. However, to ensure that students are exposed to conventional mode of testing, half the examinations will be conducted in the old manner. The average of best four of six papers would be given to the students.

Double valuation


Yet another change is the double valuation of answer scripts from this year. A new scheme of valuation has been prepared to be followed strictly by the two valuators looking into each script.

The Chief Examiner will award the better of two valuations or he will decide the marks of the difference between the two valuations is more than 12 marks.

The method has been used for the first semester examinations of final year students this year and there is a marked improvement in the marks. "Perhaps, the valuators are more careful as there is a penal action for neglect," points out Dr. Rajgopal.

To reduce burden on the valuators, no examiner will be issued more than 40 answer scripts per day.

"Burdening them with more scripts and expecting proper valuation is not fair," says the Vice-Chancellor.

An official said 13 lakh scripts were valued for the entire series of examinations held in November and December.

But due to double valuation the effective number has risen to 27 lakhs. Nearly 11,250 examiners were roped in for valuation.

Dr. Rajagopal feels the new system will effectively cut down requests for recounting. The university will consider revaluation requests but with a heavy fee, which is yet to be decided.

http://www.hindu.com/2005/12/19/stor...1900780500.htm
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Old December 20th, 2005, 11:41 PM   #46
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Red Hat, CII arm Shiksha in pact to distribute free content to schools

RED Hat, the provider of open source solutions to enterprises, and the CII's Shiksha India Trust have signed an MoU to work together to modernise the Indian education system.

Under the agreement, Red Hat and Shiksha will make the latest in IT and educational content available to educational institutions across India.

Shiksha India is a not-for-profit initiative by CII aimed at bringing in education equity through technology.

It has developed educational content that it is distributing free of cost to schools across India.

The objective of the agreement is to make software and content more affordable within the Indian education system.

Prof Y.S. Rajan, Principal Adviser, CII, said: "India has the second largest education system in the world and there is an urgent need to modernise it using IT. We have, therefore, developed content that we offer free to educational institutions.

"Even the CII-Shiksha content for teaching in schools is based on the open source concept. We will allow capable and motivated teachers to creatively modify the content and give a distinct flavour to suit the local conditions and use it for teaching in other languages."

Mr Javed Tapia, President (Indian Subcontinent), Red Hat, said: "This agreement signifies the growing acceptance of open source in India. We will work with Shiksha India to create a community of Indian educators to create content and software that can be shared freely among educational institutions."

Shiksha empowers schools with technology tools, totally free of cost, and help integrate technology effectively in the teaching-learning process.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...2102701900.htm
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 03:17 PM   #47
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Pune City’s big pull: Skill set, Oxford of the east.

One of the biggest pull factors for investments in Pune has been the resource pool. ‘‘Three of the six universities have been identified by the Centre to be education exporters. The city has 8,000 foreign students from 62 countries. To add to that, around 5,000 students study foreign languages — Japanese, German, Spanish, French and Russian,’’ the study said. The non-formal education — 5,200 students undergo chartered accountancy classes in Pune, while GRE/ GMAT too bring in students from all over the country — has also been a decisive factor.

To ensure that this talent pool remains of value to the industry, the MCCIA is launching an initiative to train faculty in the city’s colleges. The chamber will bring in experts from outside to train the faculty in Pune’s colleges, MCCIA president Ravi Pandit said. It will also design supplementary courses tailor-made to suit industry needs. ‘‘We have designed around eight to 10 courses that will be announced in the next four months,’’ Pandit said. Besides, the chamber is also working with the University of Pune to revamp its computer education at the undergraduate level.
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Old December 27th, 2005, 08:52 PM   #48
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Reservation sought for "forward" communities

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The Thamizhnadu Brahmin Association (THAMBRAAS) has demanded a 15 per cent reservation of seats in educational institutions and jobs for communities categorised as "forward."
I am gonna support this. If 75% of the seats are gone, what will happen to the FCs? They will be left eating dirt. Its a shame that we still have caste system after 60 years of independence, but if the politicians are gonna be stupid, we might as well take advantage of it and demand reservations. I do hope this goes through, but of course there will be massive protest against this, but I will pray to God this goes through. After all the FCs are also a major voting block and constitute around 30% of the population.
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Old December 27th, 2005, 11:01 PM   #49
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University of Hyderabad sets up liquid helium plant

SCIENTIFIC research required to be done at very low temperatures is set to get a major boost, especially in universities with a new liquid helium plant set up at the University of Hyderabad here.

The university has joined a select band of Indian institutions to set up a liquid helium plant. Commissioned recently, the plant can produce liquid helium at the rate of 10-40 litres per hour.

The plant at the School of Physics, will be part of the low temperature and high magnetic field facility to be set up at the university under the Department of Science and Technology sponsored project.

The facility will enable researchers to carry out experiments at very low temperatures of the order of 4 degrees Kelvin( -269 degrees Celsius). In addition, it would also facilitate experiments involving magnetic fields as high as 80,000 Oersted in phase one and 140,000 Oersteds in phase two.

The university has emerged as one of the top Indian universities in scientific research and also in attracting research funding. From a level of Rs 24 crore at the beginning of the Tenth Five-year Plan, it has reached Rs 120 crore by the end of 2005.

The Department's of Science and Technology, Biotechnology, the University Grants Commission and the Defence Research and Development Organisation have liberally provided research grants for specific projects.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...2702001900.htm
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Old December 27th, 2005, 11:13 PM   #50
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good news. we need more research funding and hopefully UofH can utilize these facilities to attract more money for ethical research.
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Old December 30th, 2005, 10:14 PM   #51
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AP to setup 3 new universities

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.......HYDERABAD: Three new conventional universities — one each in the three regions of Andhra Pradesh — will be set up at Nizamabad, Kadapa and Rajahmundry to start functioning next academic year.

This decision was taken by the Cabinet at its meeting here on Friday considering the growing number of colleges. The legislation required for establishing these universities will be adopted during the budget session of the Assembly. With this, the total number of conventional universities in the State will go up to 14.

Chief Minister Y. S. Rajasekhara Reddy told reporters an experts committee would be constituted immediately to work out details of the universities which would be allotted Rs. 100 crores each for five years. The one contemplated at Kadapa would be named after Yogi Vemana. The names for the other two were yet to be decided.

Explaining the decision, the Chief Minister said that no university had been set up in the State during the past 20 years while the number of colleges had registered a steep rise. "Osmania has 491 colleges, Andhra 382, Venkateswara 195, Kakatiya 237 and Nagarjuna 265," he said, adding that the ideal number of colleges for each university would be 100 to 150. All teaching posts would be filled soon in the existing universities.

The new universities would be self-sustaining by running self-financing courses, instead of solely depending on the Government. He denied the suggestion that he was seeking to privatise higher education and denying access to the poor.

Referring to criticism against the cut in the budget for the weaker sections, he said the Government would step up the welfare budget substantially in the next fiscal while maintaining the tempo in the irrigation sector.

The Cabinet reviewed the security measures to be taken for the upcoming major events in Hyderabad next month when the Prime Minister and other dignitaries would be here. "Security will be beefed up for these events," he said.

The Chief Minister greeted people of the State on the New Year eve. Referring to the policies of his Government, he said people were happy that Janjhavathi project was ready for commissioning while 10 other projects were poised for completion in the coming year.........
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Old December 30th, 2005, 10:22 PM   #52
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hmmm, very interesting. 3 more universities......what do y'all think? the advantages and disadvantages?? Has this been done in any other state in the recent past (in the last 2 decades)???

really never thought of such a decision. hope the standards for these new ones still remain pretty good.

also, 100 crores for each for the next 5 years translates into 1,500 crores.
if it's done in the right way, this move will give good results by producing quality students.

also, this might've been decided to some extent keeping the future in view, since there is a chance that OU colleges of engg. and tech. & AU college of engineering are in consideration for IIT status.
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 01:38 AM   #53
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BITS campus in Hyd..

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.......
HYDERABAD: The Birla Institute of Technological Sciences (BITS) that runs the sought-after technological institutions at Pilani and Goa will have its third campus at Hyderabad.

A team directors related to academics and administration at BITS Pilani is visiting the city on January 4 to discuss with the Government the modalities of establishment of the institute. Allocation of land and other related aspects would come up for discussion at the meeting. "We are committed to establishing the campus at Hyderabad and things are positively moving ahead," said S. Venkateswaran, Vice Chancellor BITS.

Land identified


He told The Hindu that the campus would be a full-fledged one on the lines of the one in Pilani. "It's going to be a large project," he said.

Sources said the Government had identified two chunks of land of which one is near Shamshabad. Each piece is about 200 acres and the visiting team would also be given the choice of searching other locations if the identified pieces of land were not found to their liking. Sources said the Government was keen to offer the land free of cost, given the wide benefits that would accrue from the technological campus, but BITS reportedly declined the offer and said it was ready to pay the cost.

According to Prof. Venkateswaran, the offer came from the Government itself and Chief Minister Y. S. Rajashekhara Reddy was very particular about its establishment. That he is very keen on the projects stems from the reports sent to BITS offering concessions and total support from the State Government.

Craze for BITS


The reason for choosing Hyderabad is not only the total support extended by the Government but also the craze for BITS education among Telugus. Incidentally, till BITS came up with its own entrance examination last year students from the State literally dominated grabbing a major share of seats at the Pilani campus.

Prof. Venkateswaran said the education offered by BITS was very good and unique and their effort was to bring in the maximum number of students under their fold.
.......
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 02:23 AM   #54
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Something for the stars

Not just star gazing, future of science is here

At IUCAA, they are mapping the sky; but this year we’ll say hello to the IIT of science

Rituparna Bhuyan

Pune, January 1: A group of Good Samaritans have volunteered to test out what could ultimately lead us to the all-important AIDS vaccine; another group, mostly astronomers, are working on mapping the sky and its stars; while someone else is doing something even bigger with the supercomputer. All this in Pune.

And the new year will see more that will push the frontiers of this already established knowledge city — the city of NCL, IUCAA, NIV if you please — even further.

For now, get ready to say hello to the proposed Indian Institute of Science, Education and Research (IISER). Set to train the future of India from the time they eject out of 12th grade, IISER has been conceptualised keeping our IITs in mind. Only two such institutes are coming up — one in Kolkata and the other in Pune. The National Chemical Laboratory (NCL) has offered 100 acres for the project and the local committee, set up to facilitate the formation of the institute, is already working on the curriculum.

When IISER is ready (by August 2006 if all goes well) the most unique and exciting aspect will be its comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach towards teaching in which pure science and humanities will be combined with super speciality fields. With premiere scientific institutions already present in Pune, there will be no dearth of specialised talent for faculty.

Well, the who’s who of science is here: like National Chemical Laboratory, the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (CDAC), professor Jayant Narlikar-founded Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), the National Institute of Virology (NIV) as well as the National Center for Cell Sciences (NCCS). And they are all up to something.

At IUCAA, Dean Ajit Kembhavi is mapping the sky. With more than a little help from local IT frontrunner, Persistent Systems, his team has prepared India’s first Virtual Laboratory, where astronomers can simply log on and scan for celestial objects.

Actually, thousands of gigabytes of data gathered by telescopes from all over the world has been put inside high-end servers of IUCAA, which can be accessed from any part of India. Christened VOI (Virtual Observatory — India) similar projects are going on in the United States, Europe, Australia and Japan.

CDAC, headquartered in Pune, is also hard at work. Its computers are looking at a solution to tackle malaria. CDAC’s biotechnology cell, along with NCCS and NIV, are working on a project to decipher the DNA of the anopheles mosquito which carries the malaria germ. In addition, CDAC is also planning to connect all the country’s supercomputers through a dedicated network, which will bring India in the elite company of those with grid computing capability.

The answer to the long-awaited AIDS vaccine may also emerge from Pune. The National AIDS Research Institute (NARI) is at the centre of it in India with phase I of the clinical trials (also on in Germany and Belgium) of the vaccine (tgAACO9) already on.

Actually, there’s a lot more. On the astronomy front, when scientists from the world debate and deliberate on the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, a radio telescope with a collective area of 1 million square miles, their colleagues at the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA) will be a key mover. Though the telescope cannot be set up in India because of technical reasons, NCRA’s first mover advantage — remember, it runs the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at Narayangaon — will help the SKA cause immensely.
So, here’s to scientific future ahead of Pune.
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 11:04 AM   #55
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Hi,

Very interesting developments. I love that. This region of the world must become leaders in all areas of education. Greetings.

I have a question though.

Can any body find or compile the list of ALL the universities in india, ranking based on areas of study?

For example, IIT would be No1 in Engineering, 2? 3? ...
Likewise (and more importantly), i think there is a university for hindu studies at Banaras (BHU??)! Are there some rankings in this area? In religions and humanities or social sciences, etc?

I would love to be guided on this, by you guys here!

Peace.
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 12:35 PM   #56
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^

I can only answer one part of your question regarding BHU. Benaras Hindu University is a full fledged university offering most disciplines, and it has one of the best technical schools in the country.
http://www.bhu.ac.in/

Similarly there is the Aligarh Muslim University, also in UP, but then again, it is also a full fledged and accomplished university.
http://www.amu.ac.in/

The India Today magazine conducts yearly rankings of Indian universities, and i think the latest rankings were posted here, so look around and you should come across them.

I simply googled universities in india and came across some sites which have a listing. Now it may not be accurate and complete.

http://www.educationinfoindia.com/

This one seems a good site:
Association of Indian Universities
Go to the members section to get a list of its member universities.

http://www.campusmatters.com/

happy browsing!
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 02:19 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merijanpakistan
Hi,
Very interesting developments. I love that. This region of the world must become leaders in all areas of education. Greetings.
I have a question though.
Can any body find or compile the list of ALL the universities in india, ranking based on areas of study?
For example, IIT would be No1 in Engineering, 2? 3? ...
Likewise (and more importantly), i think there is a university for hindu studies at Banaras (BHU??)! Are there some rankings in this area? In religions and humanities or social sciences, etc?
I would love to be guided on this, by you guys here!
Peace.
Er.. BHU is not about Hindu studies nor is Aligarh(AMU) about Muslim studies. They both were set up progressive visionaries. Still hold up the great tradition, albeit being failed by politicians once in a while.
Both have one of the best science programs in country, particularly "hard" sciences, Physics, Mathematics.

Otherwise your comments are quite important and agreed to fully.

I would suggest that SAARC pool their meagre educational resources to synergise the higher education.
India has to invest heavily in higher education too, particularly frontier research oriented. I dont know much about Pak scene.

Even better if India and Pak dumps nuke weapons program and increase education funds to at least 6% of GDP. Remember even sub-saharan countries have better education facilities than both these.
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 10:03 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nik
Remember even sub-saharan countries have better education facilities than both these.

hmmm.... i'd have to completely disagree with that. india has a sophisticated education system and like developed countries we have well established funding and grants programs. such infrastructure is not present in any of the african countries to the extent that india does except may be south africa.
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 10:54 PM   #59
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The Quiet Revolution
How India is achieving universal elementary education


India´s elite educational institutions have been producing the first-rate scientists, engineers, and managers who helped India´s information technology sector take off during the 1990s. Far less visible is the more recent, quiet revolution in India´s elementary education that, if successful, will equip an entire younger generation with skills to improve productivity and reduce the burden of disease, high birth rates, hunger, and poverty, while changing societal attitudes toward gender, caste, tribe, and disability.

What India has accomplished is no small feat—especially given that its population grew from about 840 million to nearly one billion between 1991 and 2001, with the number of children age 6 to 14 rising by 35 million to 205 million. Over roughly the same period, the gross enrollment ratio (GER) in primary education (grades 1) rose from 82 percent to 95 percent, and in upper primary education (grades 6) from 54 percent to 61 percent (see table). Available government data suggest that in that age group, the number of children not in school fell sharply from about 60 million in the early 1990s to 25 million in 2002, and this decline is continuing. While specific numbers in such a large federal system may be viewed with caution, the rough magnitude of the progress appears to be in little doubt.

The expansion of primary education—driven by major policy changes along with higher demand for schooling stemming from economic growth and globalization—took hold all across India. Historically, India´s southern and western states had always been far ahead in education of the large northern states, which accounted for most of the out-of-school children. Over the past decade, however, many poorly performing states began to make real overall advances—the primary GERs in Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, and Madhya Pradesh were well over 90 percent, although the ratio remained at 74 percent in Bihar. The southern states, the states on the east and west coasts, the Himalayan states, and the northeastern states—except for Assam and Nagaland—were either approaching universal primary enrollment or had already achieved it. Increased access for girls and children of disadvantaged groups accounted for much of the improvement. The overall GER for girls was 92 percent and over 95 percent for children of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes—the most disadvantaged groups, which make up 18 and 9 percent, respectively, of all primary school-age children.

Given the momentum built up over the years, India will, in all likelihood, meet the education Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of universal primary education—which calls for all children of primary school age to participate in the school system and complete primary school. This article explores India´s quiet revolution.

More of the article

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/...2005/06/wu.htm
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Old January 2nd, 2006, 11:08 PM   #60
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In India, Engineering Success
Monday, January 2, 2006

The classroom of the future will feature electronic white boards. The teachers of the future will write equations on these boards with electronic pens. And the students of the future won't have to choose between concentrating on the teacher and scribbling the equations into notebooks. They will devote all their energy to listening, then download the equations straight into the laptops they've plugged into their desks.

Okay, that isn't quite right. The classroom I'm describing is not some figment of the future. It's the reality I visited a month ago at the Vellore Institute of Technology.

The what? Vellore is a small town in southern India, poor enough for some of its buildings to have thatched roofs rather than the rain-proof metal sort. Until a few years ago Vellore was notable only for its large Christian medical center, erected with the help of foreign money. But now it has sprouted this 9,000-student technical college, complete with a sports stadium, an incubator for start-up high-tech businesses and a bio-separation lab. Everywhere you look, fresh buildings are under construction: over here a new laboratory complex, over there a gleaming student hostel with its own swimming pool.

Read more at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...010200566.html
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