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Old February 20th, 2008, 03:45 AM   #81
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Prague has some really major redevelopment projects: (i) Rohansky Island in Karlin, Prague 8, (ii) Nakladove Train Station in Zizkov, Prague 3, (iii) Bubny Train Station in Holesovice, Prague 7, (iv) Pankrac Plane in Pankrac, Prague 4; in addition to few medium scale projects: Prague Marina, Central Park, Na Knizeci Terminal, Masarykovo Train station, Florenc Terminal, Letna Plane, and a dozen of others. All of these areas are adjacent to the historical part of the city. When all of this is completed, and the ugly commieblocks surrounding the city are reconstructed, Prague will be beyond comparison among the cities of its size (Not mentioning the extension of subway line A to the airport, a brand new subway line D, a new fast rail to the airport, the entirely reconstructed railway network with new tunnels, the new outer and inner city highway rings, the central artery put underground and the subsequent revitalization of Wenceslas Square and conversion of the current artery in city boulvards, revitalization of the Central Station, revitalization of the Old Town Square, etc..)

Last edited by Carolus Quartus; February 20th, 2008 at 04:01 AM.
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Old February 20th, 2008, 11:11 AM   #82
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Perth, Australia.

A new Waterfront is to be built with 'iconic' towers and buildings. The area is already connected up to the transit network, with a few stations within walking distance.











This little doodle gives you a small idea of what it's like right now, and what changes to the geography will be.



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Old March 6th, 2008, 02:50 AM   #83
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Liverpool, England.
Liverpool waters scheme redevelopment of the disused docks.
http://www.liverpoolwaters.co.uk/

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Old March 6th, 2008, 04:05 AM   #84
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Perth...stunning!
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Old March 10th, 2008, 08:05 PM   #85
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Some oppose Harlem redevelopment plan
10 March 2008
AP

Harlem's heart still beats strong on 125th Street, a lively thoroughfare where remnants of the neighborhood's legendary past sit side-by-side with newly arrived banks and chain stores.

But as new development sprouts among the soul food restaurants, funky record stores and such landmarks as the Apollo Theater, Harlem's main street — named one of the nation's 10 greatest last year — is struggling to retain the character residents have cherished for decades.

On Monday, city officials are scheduled to vote on a massive rezoning plan for the corridor. The proposal would create condominiums, more performing arts space, hotels and a 21-story office tower with such high-profile tenants as Major League Baseball.

Officials say the changes will revive a cultural identity that had been threatened by unregulated development. But many longtime residents fear a rezoned 125th Street will price them out of their homes and erode even more of their community.

"It will be a disaster," said Sikhulu Shange, the owner of a 125th Street record store for more than three decades.

"People come to Harlem, they don't come to see a McDonald's. They don't come to see a Burger King," he said. "They want to come to places like The Record Shack, like Sylvia's (the famed soul food restaurant), where they can come down and feel the atmosphere of Harlem. All these things, they are in danger."

Many business leaders disagree with Shange's take on the zoning proposal, which has been in the works for four years and would cover dozens of blocks on 124th, 125th and 126th Streets. Columbia University plans a $7 billion expansion on the west side of the corridor — approved late last year — that raised similar debates about displaced residents and changed neighborhood character.

The largest arts groups in the 125th Street corridor have supported it. Jonelle Procope, president and CEO of the Apollo Theater Foundation, said the rezoning "demonstrates a true understanding of Harlem, where culture is not simply important, but fundamentally woven into the fabric of community."

The plan offers developers incentives to create performing arts space by allowing them to build three square feet of space for every one square foot for the arts, said Planning Department spokeswoman Rachaele Raynoff.

"We wanted to respect the heritage and respect the great heyday of the arts," Raynoff said. "People used to come here to be entertained. We're trying to have more Apollos."

City Council Member Inez Dickens, who represents central Harlem, has also largely supported the plan, which would require the council's approval. Dickens has said fears that rezoning would create a high-rise district are unfounded. The plan, she noted, actually sets height limits for development that don't exist now.

"If you had the resources and you could get a shovel into the ground before this rezoning, no one could stop you from building something so out of context, so out of character with the rest of the streetscape, you could pierce the very fabric of this village of Harlem," Dickens said at a public hearing.

City planners will propose one exception to the height restriction: Harlem Park, the first large office tower to be built in Harlem in decades. Major League Baseball is a likely tenant and the city has offered millions in other economic incentives.

Height is a main concern for Franc Perry, chairman of a Harlem community board. The neighborhood is one of the last business districts in New York to allow pedestrians unobstructed sky views, he said.

"It has a village character. You really do see people walking down the street saying hello to each other," Perry said.

He said no building should rise higher "than the cap of the Hotel Theresa," the landmark where Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne and Fidel Castro stayed and where Malcolm X held meetings of the Organization of Afro-American Unity after breaking from the Nation of Islam.

Perry and others also worry that allowing about 2,500 new apartments on the corridor would displace residents and threaten the street's commercial feel. Raynoff said new residents would bring a customer base for the businesses.

Shange said denser development would dwarf his small storefront, where he has fought eviction for over a year. He said when he arrived in Harlem, his store selling Caribbean, African and gospel was one of 15 music stores.

"I'm the only one left now," he said.

About 70 other small businesses with a history on the street feel similarly threatened, he said.

"The little bit we have, we are being dislocated. It doesn't seem that there is anything we can do if they are successful," Shange said. "The only thing which will help us is that this whole plan fails."
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Old March 11th, 2008, 05:24 AM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by del boy View Post
Liverpool, England.
Liverpool waters scheme redevelopment of the disused docks.
http://www.liverpoolwaters.co.uk/

looks pretty impressive!..do you have any idea how tall the towers will be? on the HP it says "over 50 floors"..possibly 200m maybe? it also says that they'll have place for more than 50000 residents..pretty impressive i must say,this seems to be some of the biggest renewal projects in Europe currently,i wonder when they'll start to build it.. it could maybe be a 2nd Canary wharf !
some more images of what could(and should) be a highly interesting project IMO:

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Old March 11th, 2008, 05:31 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by del boy View Post
Liverpool, England.
Liverpool waters scheme redevelopment of the disused docks.
http://www.liverpoolwaters.co.uk/

Just out of curiousity, given that the population has historically been dropping in Liverpool (or at least recently been growing fairly slowly), is there really a reasonable belief that there will be a demand for that many new buildings? This isn't something unique to Liverpool, though, as many other cities (including Boston where I live) that have not had booming population growth have trouble with trying to balance the regeneration of a certain areas versus the reality that the demand isn't always there to fill the buildings like they can in places like Shanghai, Dubai, etc.
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Old March 12th, 2008, 03:06 AM   #88
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The thing is there’s always been a fear of tall buildings in Liverpool in case they ruined the skyline or detracted attention from older buildings such as the Liver building. Somehow Beetham tower managed to get through and I think it showed people that tall buildings can work in the city and it has acted as a catalyst for more tall buildings and a renewed interest in the city.

Due to Liverpool and Shanghai being paired cities one of the taller buildings in the development is to be named ‘Shanghai tower’. This tower is still at the design stage but is rumoured to be stunning. It is planned to be 60 stories which will be one of the tallest in the country and will be surrounded by water.

The city has been suffering from population loss mainly because of the decline of industry in the country and the closure of many of the docks. However the city is certainly on the up, everywhere you look there is redevelopment. Due to be completed later this year is the Liverpool 1 scheme which is Europe’s biggest retail development costing 1 billion and creating 300 new retail units as well as a park. These sorts of developments should attract more people to the city to sustain the growth and thankfully there is still more to come.

On the opposite side of the river Mersey planned by the same company is the Wirral Waters development which is similar to Liverpool Waters but on a much smaller scale.
http://www.wirralwaters.co.uk/main.html

Finally this is a brilliant thread in the Liverpool section summing up all the major developments and a few minor ones in case any one is interested in seeing how much is actually going on in the city.
https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=218577
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Old March 13th, 2008, 07:44 PM   #89
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Wall Street Journal
Colleges Teach 'Urban Development 101'
Tuesday February 26, 10:50 pm ET
By Nick Timiraos



One of the most ambitious real-estate-development projects in Philadelphia involves revamping a 42-acre eyesore on the banks of the Schuylkill River into a hub featuring gleaming office towers, apartments, a hotel and restaurants. The catalyst for the $2 billion redevelopment: the University of Pennsylvania.

Universities, increasingly, are extending their reach to off-campus development in an effort to give their surrounding areas and town centers a vibrant and modern feel. In the process, they are becoming major drivers of economic development after concluding that their fortunes are directly tied to those of their cities.

"The future of Penn depends on the future of Philadelphia," says Penn President Amy Gutmann. "If we don't take on the challenge of helping to redevelop our part of the city, nobody else is going to do it as well as we are going to do it." University officials say the campaign could eventually bring 4,000 new jobs to the area.

Another reason for the push is that institutions are recognizing that, along with lucrative financial packages and strong academic reputations, they need to have attractive and exciting college towns to lure top faculty and students.

The University of Maryland in College Park is converting a 38-acre tract of industrial development on its campus into a shopping district with a hotel, theaters and a music center to further spur redevelopment along a depressed stretch of U.S. Route 1, the town's main thoroughfare.

"We've actually lost some [potential] faculty who have driven down Route 1 and said, 'We're not going to move here,' " says , who is overseeing the $700 million redevelopment project.

Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University is developing an arts and retail district in a neighborhood on its campus border that students and faculty consider unsafe. "We've been living around it for years," says , Case Western's architect and planner. Other universities, including Harvard and Columbia, have begun to develop recently acquired, large parcels adjacent to their campuses.

Penn's project is part of a $6.7 billion 30-year expansion and follows a separate effort that began more than 10 years ago to improve blighted parts of its residential community after a crime wave threatened student and faculty recruitment. The university renovated homes, converted a parking lot into a bookstore and movie theater and opened a public school to spur community development. "It turned into a competitive advantage," says Judith Rodin, who served as Penn's president for 10 years until 2004.

But real-estate deals aren't always an easy sell. While a private developer will handle Penn's current project, the university couldn't find a partner during its first wave of development in the 1990s, forcing university leaders to justify the school's decision to invest $100 million on its own, as some faculty preferred to see more money go toward faculty endowments.

Neighbors also eye some expansion projects warily, such as New York University's proposal to add six million square feet to its campuses in the next 25 years, half of that in Greenwich Village. "There are more and more parts of the neighborhood where you feel like NYU is the sole defining entity, and that footprint is growing and growing," says Andrew Burman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.

Developers are eager to join ventures with colleges, which they see as providing a steady stream of business. "Universities are fairly reliable partners," says , president-elect of the Society for College and University Planning, who argues that universities are recession-resistant: "As the overall economy gets worse, higher education enrollments tend to go up."

Penn's campus expansion will allow the school to move administrative and nonessential activities to the campus periphery while bringing academic and residential units to the campus center.

Penn has partnered with , which has a 90-year lease on the property it plans to develop. Construction has begun on one parcel, but the 2012 completion date for the 43-story Cira Centre South office building could be pushed back by the current credit crunch. The developer says it is looking for partners and will decide next year whether to change its timetable.

Write to Nick Timiraos at [email protected]
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Old March 20th, 2008, 04:28 PM   #90
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Perth's new waterfront looks amazing! I'll have to check out the aussie pages, i had no idea. I thought docklands in melbourne was easily the most exciting part of the country, but this gives it a run for its money. Excellent!
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Old March 31st, 2008, 11:50 AM   #91
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Holy Spirits! Aussies turn pub into church

MELBOURNE, Oct 29, 2007 (Reuters) - Jesus Christ may have turned water into wine, but for a group of Australian churchgoers the ideal place to worship on a Sunday is a pub.

Devoid of a church in the docklands entertainment area of Melbourne, a group of Christians have created the "Docklands Church" inside the James Squire Brewhouse.

"Jesus did turn water into wine, he was kind of radical, he was connected with his culture, and yet he had a great message for our world," Docklands Church minister Guy Mason said after his first service on Sunday.

Mason told local media that worshippers were offered not only a message from the bible but also a meal and tea and coffee, but anyone could have a pint before or after the church service. The choice of location was a way of modernising the church, he said.

"All we want to be is relevant, we want to be applicable and contemporary and...we're going to keep the bible open as well," said one parishioner, with a beer in his hand.

Another parishioner said: "I think a lot of people who do want to go out and have a drink or go out and have a party often feel that they're excluded from God".
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Old March 31st, 2008, 07:06 PM   #92
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Some redevelopments from Budapest:

Corvin promenade





Károlyi István City Centre




Duna City


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Old March 31st, 2008, 09:39 PM   #93
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Many small urban redevelopment projects all over the Paris urban area, I'll try to find some pics later on.
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Old October 16th, 2008, 08:04 AM   #94
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Atlanta breaks ground on major Beltline project
15 October 2008

ATLANTA (AP) - Officials behind Atlanta's most ambitious project in decades chose a fitting spot for its Wednesday kickoff: A neglected industrial plot dotted with debris in the shadows of construction towers cobbling together a flashy new high-rise.

Proponents of Atlanta's Beltline project hope that transforming unused railroad tracks ringing the city into a 22-mile loop of parks and paths will also lead to a new round of job growth and economic redevelopment in blighted neighborhoods.

And while the financial turmoil has raised fears that the plan could be delayed as the city tightens its belt, the project's boosters seemed eager to pronounce the Beltline alive and well.

"The Beltline is always going to have challenges, but these elements are moving forward," said Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin. "As soon as the credit markets, the funding markets in Washington and New York settle down, we'll continue to move forward."

The project's organizers have already delayed plans to sell $120 million in bonds, but city council member Kwanza Hall said Wednesday the city will try again next week in hopes that the bond markets will calm.

"It's a little blip," Hall said. "But it's not going to stop us."

Supporters say the plan could propel Atlanta from the bottom of the pack of major cities in green space to square in the middle, while at the same time generating economic development by linking together affluent and struggling, isolated neighborhoods.

Urban planning experts are closely watching how the project plays out, saying it could serve as a blueprint for so-called smart growth developments across the country.

Atlanta officials chose to break ground on the project at a sprawling gravel lot just east of downtown where the 35-acre Historic Fourth Ward Park will soon stand. About a dozen developers have snatched up land around the industrial area anticipating a boom.

City officials had originally proposed a $40 million stormwater tunnel project at the site, but reconsidered when community organizers and developers drafted a $30 million plan with a stormwater detention pond at the center.

The entire Beltline project is expected to cost $2.8 billion over 25 years, and officials say it could ultimately add more than 1,200 acres of greenspace, 33 miles of trails and light rail to connect 45 city neighborhoods.

But it faces a number of immediate hurdles, including a November ballot question that asks Georgia votes if school tax revenues can be used to help economic redevelopment efforts. The Beltline and other redevelopment efforts rely on the subsidies to fund construction.

The message on Wednesday from Beltline supporters, though, was one of hope and optimism. Standing on the concrete slab of some long-forgotten building, one speaker after another praised the project before a crowd of businessman in suits and residents with dogs and bicycles in tow.

Rob Hunter, Atlanta's commissioner of watershed management, had perhaps the loftiest ideals. He said the project could be an example of how cities should take a broad approach to redevelopment projects amid the new financial landscape.

"This is really a new paradigm for how the city has to operate," he said.

------

On the Net:

http://www.beltline.org
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Old October 16th, 2008, 09:06 PM   #95
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anybody can show the urban development of guadalajara for the panamarican games
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Old June 6th, 2009, 09:56 AM   #96
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Impoverished E. St. Louis hopes park, overlook facing Gateway Arch lead to riverfront renewal
5 June 2009

image hosted on flickr

Source : http://www.flickr.com/photos/meprd

EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. (AP) - The panoramic view of the shimmering Gateway Arch and St. Louis skyline is stirring. But for this struggling city, the debut of a new riverfront park offers a vision of far bigger things.

Decades in the making, the 34-acre Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park opening Saturday transformed a once-scrubby patch of riverfront land into a thing of beauty. It's also what architect Eero Saarinen wanted when he finished the arch 44 years ago -- a complement to his masterpiece across the Mississippi River and a vantage point from which visitors could marvel at it.

"We refer to it as the new jewel on the Mississippi," said Mike Buehlhorn, executive director of the Metro East Park and Recreation District. "This is a huge dream. It's just awesome, I don't know how else to say it."

And it couldn't have come at a better time for East St. Louis Mayor Alvin Parks Jr., who hopes the park -- named for the man who pushed for it for years before dying in 2004 at age 91 -- draws tourists and precious development to the city and its riverfront.

"I am terrifically excited about what the development is ... it gives you the absolute best view of St. Louis as you will have anywhere on the planet," Parks said. Yet, "I think the greatest benefit has yet to be seen," through potential development such as condominiums and hotels.

East St. Louis, once a thriving home to glass makers and other industrial companies, withered into one of the nation's poorest cities after the decline of factories and the exodus of whites in the 1960s. It's a place where potholed streets resemble lunar landscapes, where more than 35 percent of the roughly 31,000 residents live in poverty.

The deed to City Hall once went to a man to cover a multimillion-dollar judgment over a jail beating before the city got the building back on appeal. In recent years, five locals -- including the head of the local Democratic Party -- were convicted of scheming to buy votes.

But the city also was the adoptive home of the late Katherine Dunham, a famed dancer and choreographer. Track legend and Olympic gold medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee was born and reared here, and a youth center now bears her name. Late jazz great Miles Davis grew up here, as did NFL Hall of Famer Kellen Winslow and Tennis Hall of Famer Jimmy Connors.

Now the park, with a four-story overlook and a mechanical geyser, represents a beacon of hope for urban renewal, supporters say.

Buehlhorn, from the park and recreation district, and others believe the overlook could draw several hundred thousand guests each year, perhaps many of them seeking a respite from the Casino Queen, which along with a Cargill plant are two of the park's neighbors.

Supported by concrete columns the size of a giant redwood trunk, the overlook amounts to a continuous, rectangular ramp, highlighted by stainless steel railing, winding its way to the observation deck 43 feet in the air. There, a statue of Martin takes up the edge of a stone bench, his leg folded as the likeness gazes at the arch.

On the park's other end, past the tiered seating for events including fireworks shows, is the 14-year-old Gateway Geyser, which a few times a day from April through October puts on a 15-minute show, shooting water skyward nearly as high as the 630-foot arch.

Days ahead of its debut, a walk to the top of the observation deck offers a glimpse of what awaits visitors. A tugboat pushes a string of barges lazily up the sun-drenched yet ruddy Mississippi, past the gleaming arch and the rest of the St. Louis skyline.

Below, pastel-colored walkways cut through and around the park sporting freshly laid sod and more than 100 light posts.

"I'm just amazed I have the honor to see this through," Buehlhorn said with a nod to Martin, the man who wouldn't let his vision die. "It was his dream to get this open. I'd like to think we did it in a good fashion for him."

------

On the Net:

Metro East Park and Recreation District: http://www.meprd.org.
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Old June 6th, 2009, 09:13 PM   #97
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Toronto's Waterfront redevelopment plans (scroll to the right):


East Bayfront




West Donlands




Portlands


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Old June 7th, 2009, 04:06 PM   #98
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please help

hi friends....am a of M Arch ( gen) ,, am doin my desertation project on " sustainable redeveloment of old urban industrial area" am tryin to find out some case studies and information on this... can anyone help me please... thank you in advance
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Old June 8th, 2009, 02:48 AM   #99
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If there is a new park at the area where the Gateway Geyser is, then there should be redevelopment projects everywhere in East St. Louis. It is a seedy wasteland filled with vacant buildings. But with the high crime rate in the city, any redevelopment plans for the city would face major challenges.
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Old June 9th, 2009, 08:55 AM   #100
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hope that battersea power station project goes well, it should have been done ages ago.
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