Water Shortages in Our Cities - Page 4 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Citytalk and Urban Issues

Citytalk and Urban Issues » Guess the City


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 24th, 2008, 05:17 AM   #61
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,460
Likes (Received): 72

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimension View Post
http://www.cglg.org/projects/water/C...ementation.asp
http://www.glc.org/

Looks like no water will be leaving the Great Lakes to aid in any of the water crises in the US and Canada or even the world.
Good. The Great Lakes have no water to spare. If their water was siphoned for consumption outside the drainage basin then shipping and the local climate would be threatened.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old July 24th, 2008, 07:16 PM   #62
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Cyprus water shipment suffers more setbacks

NICOSIA, July 23 (Reuters) - Repeated delays in shipping much needed water from Greece has left one of Cyprus's largest cities with only two weeks' supply of water as the country faces severe drought, officials said on Wednesday.

New setbacks in getting drinking water off a ship for the 177,000 residents of Limassol, a port city in the south, has left its reservoir with only 0.8 million cubic metres of supplies.

The city requires 45,000 cubic metres of water per day.

"The way things are going now, it's not enough to last even 20 days. It's possibly enough for 17 or 18 days," said Kyriakos Kyrrou, an official from Cyprus's water department.

"But whatever happens, people will get water," he told Reuters.

Cyprus, facing its worst water shortage in decades, has ordered 8.0 million cubic metres of water from Greece. Ships will carry out about 200 shuttles until November.

But the project has faced repeated setbacks. Initially, the ship-to-shore pipeline was not ready when a boat docked at the end of June because of a short pipe.

When it was finally hooked-up, authorities ruled the water had to be discharged into boreholes instead of the supply network because it had been on the boat for too many days.

Part of the pipeline had to be disconnected at the weekend because of an air blockage, and authorities say it may be back online only by next Sunday.

Cyprus has two water desalination plants producing 100,000 cubic metres of water daily, supplying the capital Nicosia and eastern areas of the island.

Authorities said they would divert some of the desalinated water to Limassol if the situation deteriorates further.

"All I can say is God help us," said hotel employee Stavroulla Soteriou, 55, in Limassol. "I really don't know what more we can do once the water runs out."
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2008, 01:26 AM   #63
Twoaday
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 1,571
Likes (Received): 1572

agreed

Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
Good. The Great Lakes have no water to spare. If their water was siphoned for consumption outside the drainage basin then shipping and the local climate would be threatened.
Agreed approval of the Great Lakes Compact was a good move for those states as there have from time to time been plans to ship water out of the basin. And of course removing the water from the basin has the potential for all sorts of negative consequences.
__________________

Urban Milwaukee "Championing Urban Life In The Cream City"
My Flickr Photos
Twoaday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old July 27th, 2008, 05:15 AM   #64
l'eau
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: trollingburg ;_;
Posts: 3,986
Likes (Received): 126

Quote:
Originally Posted by Istanbullu View Post
Mayor of Ankara is a bloody moron!
absolutely RIGHT!!!
l'eau no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 3rd, 2008, 12:49 PM   #65
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Water worries lead cities, businesses and homeowners to ancient art of rainwater harvesting
30 August 2008

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Tara Hui climbed under her deck, nudged past a cluster of 55-gallon barrels and a roosting chicken, and pointed to a shiny metal gutter spout.

"See that?" she said. "That's where the rainwater comes in from the roof."

Hui is one of a growing band of people across the country turning to collected rainwater for non-drinking uses like watering plants, flushing toilets and washing laundry.

Concern over drought and wasted resources, and stricter water conservation laws have revitalized the practice of capturing rainwater during storms and stockpiling it for use in drier times. A fixture of building design in the Roman empire and in outposts along the American frontier, rainwater harvesting is making a comeback in states including Texas, North Carolina, and California.

"We call it 'the movement that's taking the nation by storm,'" said Robyn Hadley, spokeswoman for the Austin, Texas-based American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association, whose membership has jumped by more than 40 percent this year.

Hui, 37, got her first 55-gallon plastic barrel for free five years ago. The barrel had been packed with maraschino cherries, so when rain first filled it the water smelled like candied fruit.

Now, she has a daisy chain of 25 linked barrels under her back deck with a combined capacity of nearly 1,250 gallons. She built the system herself, after searching the Internet for information and buying the necessary plumbing parts at a hardware store. The whole setup cost her $200.

The average American uses 101 gallons of water a day at home and in the yard. Add in agricultural and industrial water use and that climbs to an average of 1,430 gallons per day per person.

Scientists warn that climate change will result in more severe droughts and erratic storms worldwide, and this spring was the driest in California's 114 years of record-keeping. Extreme drought and abnormally dry conditions persist across large swaths of the country, with states in the West and Southeast hardest hit.

Even in a drought, it only takes a few hours of heavy rain to fill all 25 of Hui's barrels. She uses that water throughout the summer to irrigate her backyard.

This fall, San Francisco will try to recruit more people to hoard the rain. The city will be putting $100,000 toward hosting how-to workshops and offering rebates and discounts on rainwater catchment tanks.

In addition to conserving water, these efforts help alleviate the problem of storm runoff. Asphalt-covered roads, sidewalks and parking lots repel storm water, forcing it down storm drains and into creeks rather than allowing it to soak into soil. Big flushes of storm water in water treatment systems can send raw sewage flowing into the ocean. Overloaded streams can cause flooding and damage salmon habitat.

Elsewhere, roofs are being used to collect rain from Austin to Seattle. Santa Monica's new library sits atop a 200,000-gallon rainwater cistern, and in August the city launched a rainwater rebate program for homeowners. In Marin County, a recent seminar on rainwater harvesting attracted a standing-room-only crowd of several hundred.

Doug Pushard, a software entrepreneur and rain collection enthusiast based in Santa Fe, N.M., runs HarvestH2O.com, a Web-based organization providing information on rainwater harvesting. It got more than 23,000 page views in July, almost triple the number he got in the same month last year, along with numerous calls and e-mails.

New companies and ingenuity in plumbing and policy are pushing rainwater harvesting from the off-the-grid fringe to the core of 21st century green building design.

"You still have to be a tinkerer to make things work, but that's changing," said Pushard.

Every year, Sunset Magazine sponsors several "idea houses" featuring sustainable building design. As many as 40,000 people stream through each house to study the latest in green architecture. The 2007 idea houses in San Francisco and Lake Tahoe collected rainwater, as will this year's idea house in Monterey.

"We're going to see a lot more design features for recycled water and rainwater catchment," said Dave Walls, executive director of the California Building Standards Commission, which in July adopted new building codes for the state requiring new buildings to strictly conserve water.

In June, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation gave a Washington-based nonprofit $4.2 million to determine whether rainwater harvesting could provide potable water to the billions of poor people worldwide who lack access to clean water. Drought-prone and groundwater-scarce places like Australia, the Bahamas, Iran and parts of India are already busy pooling precipitation.

"People don't think about where their water comes from or how much they use," Hui said as she used her collected rainwater for irrigation. "We all need to."
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2008, 10:45 AM   #66
gladisimo
If I could be anyone...
 
gladisimo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: SF, FC, HK
Posts: 2,547
Likes (Received): 40

The SF East Bay has been hit by water shortage this year. It actually doesn't sound like such a bad idea if you can filter the water properly, to supplement your water system.
__________________
I left my <3 in HK

RIP Dopey - 9/2005 - 20/2/2008
gladisimo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 20th, 2008, 09:29 AM   #67
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

San Diego mayor declares water shortage emergency
29 July 2008

SAN DIEGO (AP) - Mayor Jerry Sanders has declared a San Diego water shortage emergency and he's asking residents to voluntarily conserve or face mandatory curbs.

The City Council voted unanimously Monday on the so-called Stage 1 water shortage emergency. The council's Natural Resources and Culture Committee will hold hearings in September to consider mandatory cutbacks.

Sanders says San Diego's water use dropped by 7 percent after he initially called for voluntary conservation in February, but consumption has now returned to previous levels.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2008, 06:06 AM   #68
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Water use in Long Beach decreases 9 percent after call for conservation, higher rates
10 October 2008

LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) - Demand for water in Long Beach dipped to a 10-year low as residents heeded a citywide call to conserve water and responded to higher rates.

The Long Beach Water Department issued a report this week that showed water demand was 9.2 percent below the 10-year average. Customers used 6,368 acre-feet less water this fiscal year than the year before. An acre-foot refers to about how much water a family of four typically uses in a year.

In September 2007, the department declared that a water shortage was imminent and urged conservation. Under the declaration, residents couldn't wash their driveways with a garden hose and restaurants were barred from serving customers a glass of water unless they ask for it.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 15th, 2008, 06:54 AM   #69
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Water supplies may drop for Calif. cities, farms
14 November 2008

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) - California fish and wildlife managers on Friday approved new rules that could severely restrict pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to protect a native fish, triggering protests from farmers and cities reeling already from water shortages.

The Fish and Game Commission voted 3-0 to enact emergency regulations that may scale back water pumping from December through February to safeguard the longfin smelt, considered a bellwether species for the estuary.

"Clearly as a society we haven't erred on the side of the fish in the past; we've erred on the side of the water supply," said Commissioner Michael Sutton. "We have to come down on the side of the fish. If we don't take care of these ecosystems, they're not going to yield us the services for much longer."

Pumping restrictions would only kick in if scientists find a certain number of dead or living longfin smelt in various sampling locations throughout the delta, including near the massive pumps that send water to more than 25 million Southern Californians.

Water officials say they expect some reductions will happen.

The regulations could slash state and federal water deliveries by up to 1.1 million acre feet, bringing California's total water supply to slightly more than half of what it would be in an average year.

That's in addition to recent water cutbacks imposed by the state Department of Water Resources, which plans to deliver just 15 percent of the amount that local water agencies request every year.

The combination "could create a water supply and delivery crisis the likes of which Californians have not seen in decades," warned Director Lester Snow in a statement.

Another dry winter may prompt widespread water rationing in cities from the San Francisco Bay area to San Diego, and a drop in the diversity of crops planted over the coming months, said Carl Torgersen, who operates the State Water Project for the department.

Major agriculture groups said new cuts could cripple farming families already struggling to do business since a federal judge ordered federal and state agencies to restrict pumping last year to protect the threatened delta smelt, the longfin's cousin.

"So much uncertainty around the water supply will make it hard for farmers to get crop loans," said Sarah Woolf, a spokeswoman for the Westlands Water District. "Growers will have to give their first priority to permanent crops like almonds and pistachios and grapes, rather than planting things like lettuce and broccoli."

The new regulations for longfin smelt will be in force only while the fish migrate, spawn and hatch in the estuary, for a 90-day period starting Dec. 1.

If scientists find fish in dangerous conditions during that timeframe, the rules will trigger an evaluation process that involves five state and federal agencies and ultimately falls to Department of Fish and Game Director Don Koch for a final decision.

Koch said he reserves the right to take no action, especially if a forthcoming federal plan to protect the delta smelt is found to also protect the longfin.

Until Feb. 4, when the commission is scheduled to decide whether the longfin smelt qualifies for listing under the state Endangered Species Act, the fish will enjoy the same protections as endangered species. In the meantime, any dredging in the estuary also will be temporarily banned so the species' floating larvae can develop safely.

Laura King Moon, whose organization represents districts that provide water to Los Angeles and Alameda counties, said the regulations risked slowing California's economy in the midst of a downturn.

"This may not be felt in residential neighborhoods immediately, but it will add to our cities' calls for increased voluntary conservation and increase water prices," said King Moon, assistant general manager of the State Water Contractors. "This will eat further into drought reserves that have been set aside in the event of another dry year."

Without the protections, however, biologists warned the silvery, 5-inch-long fish might not survive.

The population of the longfin smelt is 3 percent of the level measured less than 20 years ago, according to a petition filed by the Center of Biological Diversity, which asked the commission to list the species as endangered.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2008, 07:19 AM   #70
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Experts: Half world faces water shortage by 2080
18 November 2008

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) - Half the world's population could face a shortage of clean water by 2080 because of climate change, experts warned Tuesday.

Wong Poh Poh, a professor at the National University of Singapore, told a regional conference that global warming was disrupting water flow patterns and increasing the severity of floods, droughts and storms -- all of which reduce the availability of drinking water.

Wong said the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that as many as 2 billion people won't have sufficient access to clean water by 2050. That figure is expected to rise to 3.2 billion by 2080 -- nearly tripling the number who now do without it.

Reduced access to clean water -- which refers to water that can be used for drinking, bathing or cooking -- forces many villagers in poor countries to walk miles to reach supplies. Others, including those living in urban shanties, suffer from diseases caused by drinking from unclean sources.

At the beginning of the decade, the World Health Organization estimated that 1.1 billion people did not have sufficient access to clean water.

Asia, home to more than 4 billion people, is the most vulnerable region, especially India and China, where booming populations have placed tremendous stress on water sources, said Wong, a member of the U.N. panel.

"In Asia, water distribution is uneven and large areas are under water stress. Climate change is going to exacerbate this scarcity," he told the two-day Asia Pacific Regional Water Conference attended by policy makers, government officials, academics, businessmen and consumer group representatives.

Scientists have said global climate change takes many forms, causing droughts in some areas while increasing flooding and the severity of cyclones in others. Droughts reduce water supply, and floods destroy the quality of water. Rising sea levels, for instance, increase the salt content at the mouths of many rivers, from which many Asians draw their drinking water.

"As human civilization develops, the environment is increasingly affected in negative ways. Floods, drought, changing rainfall patterns and rising temperatures are signs of our misdeeds to nature," said Rozali Ismail, head of a state water association in Malaysia.

Wong and others at the conference called on governments to embrace the Kyoto Protocol climate treaty to fight global warming and protect water resources, as a short-term solution.

But eventually governments must build infrastructure to protect coastal areas, improve management of water basins and adopt new technologies to enhance availability and reliability of water resources, Wong said.

The United Nations is currently campaigning to replace the 1997 Kyoto Protocol -- which regulates the emissions of 37 industrial countries -- with another accord at a meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009.

The Kyoto Protocol was signed by 183 nations in 1997. But the United States -- long the world's biggest emitter, though it is now rivaled by China -- rejected the plan over concerns it would harm the American economy.

Developing countries such as China and India also refused to accept a binding arrangement that they said would limit their development.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2008, 08:19 AM   #71
Whiteeclipse
Registered User
 
Whiteeclipse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Florida, USA/Moscow, RU
Posts: 2,578
Likes (Received): 375

Many Middle East countries are using desalination plants to produce clean water from sea and other countries will follow when the need becomes greater.
__________________
Jonathan and Charlotte - Britain's Got Talent 2012 Live Semi Final
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eEc2WxCUcY

It's China's world, we just live in it.
Whiteeclipse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2008, 09:36 AM   #72
Greg
Registered User
 
Greg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,484
Likes (Received): 70

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteeclipse View Post
Many Middle East countries are using desalination plants to produce clean water from sea and other countries will follow when the need becomes greater.
This is environmentally stupid and the amount of energy needed is by far to large. Much could be done with water-recycling systems, sewage plants etc.
Greg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2008, 05:41 PM   #73
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

I don't think water recycling technology alone can satisfy the water needs for such a large population spread across a huge piece of land.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2008, 08:02 AM   #74
bayviews
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,535
Likes (Received): 51

Certainly many US cities in the southwest, the Pheonixes & the Las Vegas plus many of the ones in California, already face a critical water shortage.

Yet the US is in a better position to solve this problem than many other countries, should it choose to doso.

Since much of the growth is thru immigration, it can redirect the immigrant growth away from the Sunbelt to cities along the Great Lakes Snowbelt that have plenty of water & excess housing & infrastructure.

If you want to come to the US fine, but plan on settling in Pittsburgh, Buffalo or Cincinnatti, rather than Vegas or Pheonix!
bayviews no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2008, 08:32 AM   #75
Whiteeclipse
Registered User
 
Whiteeclipse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Florida, USA/Moscow, RU
Posts: 2,578
Likes (Received): 375

bayviews, good point but the climate is much better in Vegas and Phoenix.
__________________
Jonathan and Charlotte - Britain's Got Talent 2012 Live Semi Final
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eEc2WxCUcY

It's China's world, we just live in it.
Whiteeclipse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2008, 09:38 AM   #76
xXFallenXx
Registered User
 
xXFallenXx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 3,862
Likes (Received): 170

^ How so? It's oppressively hot 6 months out of the year in both of those locations.
xXFallenXx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2008, 07:42 PM   #77
Whiteeclipse
Registered User
 
Whiteeclipse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Florida, USA/Moscow, RU
Posts: 2,578
Likes (Received): 375

Quote:
Originally Posted by xXFallenXx View Post
^ How so? It's oppressively hot 6 months out of the year in both of those locations.
Some people would rather deal with the heat then the snow.
__________________
Jonathan and Charlotte - Britain's Got Talent 2012 Live Semi Final
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eEc2WxCUcY

It's China's world, we just live in it.
Whiteeclipse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2008, 10:35 AM   #78
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Chilean glacier will vanish in 50 years: study
1 November 2008
Agence France Presse

Chile's official water authority warned Saturday that the Echaurren glacier near Santiago, which supplies the capital with 70 percent of its water needs, could disappear in the next half century.

In a new report on Chile's glaciers the main water company -- Direccion General de Aguas de Chile (DGA) -- said the ice fields of Echaurren are receding up to 12 meters (39.37 feet) per year.

"These glaciers are vanishing," said Antonio Vergara of the DGA, who has worked on glacier research on the fields for 35 years.

At the current rate of decline, Echaurren and other smaller glaciers near Santiago could disappear over the next 50 years.

The river Maipo and its smaller tributaries, key water sources for Santiago, its environs and agriculture in region, all flow from Echaurren.

The water shortage would force Chileans to seek new sources of water and would cause "large-scale population displacement in central Chile," said Vergara.

Located 50 kilometers (21 miles) east of Santiago, on the western slopes of the Andes mountain range, the Echaurren glacier is one of the 10 most studied ice fields in the world, and is considered a "landmark in the global studies of climate change," said DGA director Rodrigo Weisner.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2008, 06:21 AM   #79
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Water crisis requires more than a cold shower
25 November 2008
The Age

Domestic water use is easy to cut. It isn't the whole problem.

JUST in case anyone thought that a weekend of heavy rain might have made all the difference, the State Government yesterday reminded Melburnians that they are still living with the consequences of severe drought and will do so for the foreseeable future. The long-threatened move to stage 4 water restrictions, under which all outdoor watering would be banned, has been averted yet again. Domestic water users are being prompted to do a little bit extra, however, to ensure that the outdoor ban doesn't happen. In order to keep stage 3a restrictions in place, people are now asked to make do with 155 litres a day each instead of the present average of 165 litres. In case consumers are not sure how this can be done, a $5.4million advertising campaign is about to begin, offering such tips as reducing showers from seven minutes to four, preferably using a water-efficient shower head.

There is no doubt about the gravity of the water shortage: Melbourne's catchments are at 33per cent of capacity, compared with 40 per cent at this time last year - and that was hardly adequate. And we cannot deny the need for all of us to reduce our consumption, through shorter showers and whatever else we may be able to do. However, each time a new batch of restrictions, voluntary or otherwise, is trundled out, it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that the Government's attitude to water management remains one of relying on ad hoc local responses and, as far as it is available, engineering wizardry. What continues to be missing from the Government's pronouncements on water is a sense that it must deal with the drought, exacerbated by climate change, as a crisis affecting not just Melbourne, or even Victoria, but the whole of south-eastern Australia. The Government is intent on connecting Melbourne's water supply with the ecologically stressed Murray-Darling Basin through the Goulburn pipeline, yet it talks as though the Murray-Darling has one set of problems and the metropolitan area another.

Those responsible for studying water resources and water allocation have no such illusion. While the Government has been conjuring up visions of a future shaped by pipelines, desalination plants and high-tech shower nozzles, the CSIRO has been completing a comprehensive study of water availability in the Murray-Darling Basin. The report, submitted to the Federal Government last month, provides a set of statistical markers for what anyone who has lived through this drought knows anecdotally to be true. In the southern part of the basin, the drought of 1996-2006 resulted in the lowest catchment run-off on record, and drought conditions have worsened in this part of the basin in the past two years. And, lest anyone still be tempted to describe the severe drought not as a consequence of climate change but as a cyclical event, the report makes a sobering comparison. Instead of the usual "once-in-100-years" line favoured by those who prefer the cyclical explanation, the CSIRO scientists say, if climate change is not taken into account this drought would actually be a once-in-300-years event.

It is from that threatened southern Murray-Darling Basin that 75billion litres will be diverted down the Goulburn pipeline to Melbourne. The State Government is investing $1 billion in new irrigation infrastructure in the hope of stemming the amount of water that is "lost" each year, and thus keeping both farmers and city domestic consumers happily supplied. Or so the theory has it.

And then there is the $3.1 billion desalination plant planned for Wonthaggi, which, apart from doubts raised about its environmental impact on marine areas, will be an enormous energy investment, with an effect equivalent to the pollution from 250,000 cars.

Earlier this year, in our "Watershed" special reports, The Age questioned the highly engineered water strategy being pursued by the state - while also recognising that after almost 12 years of drought and a failure to act earlier, alternatives such as recycling sewage for drinking water and reducing the amount of land used for irrigated agriculture, which consumes 77 per cent of the state's water, are harder to sell politically. Meanwhile, the Government can reasonably ask Melburnians to shower frugally and water their gardens with the sudsy residue, as indeed we should. It won't, however, make the tough, politically unpalatable questions go away.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 4th, 2008, 04:57 PM   #80
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 98,798
Likes (Received): 24114

Cholera-hit Zimbabwe restores water to most parts of capital
3 December 2008
Agence France Presse

Zimbabwe authorities on Wednesday restored water to most parts of the capital Harare after a cut more than 48 hours ago amid a cholera outbreak that has killed more than 500, a minister said.

"As of last night, pumping capacity has been increased to 80 percent and the greater part of the central business district (in Harare) and most high density suburbs are receiving normal supplies," water resources deputy minister Walter Mzembi told AFP.

Taps in Harare ran dry on Saturday after the state-run water company, ZINWA, ran short of aluminium sulphate, a chemical used to purify water.

The water cuts compounded fears over the spread of cholera. The death toll from the outbreak has now risen to 565, with 12,546 cases of the acute intestinal disease reported nationwide, according to the United Nations on Wednesday.

The water shortage had resulted in people digging shallow wells, while some made brisk business in selling water.

An AFP correspondent reported that although water had been restored in Harare's central business district and other residential areas, some areas only receive water in the evenings.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Need for Water in Our Cities hkskyline Citytalk and Urban Issues 3 October 17th, 2007 09:14 AM
What U.S. cities, 100K people or more, were not built on a major body of water? Rwarky United States Urban Issues 62 May 30th, 2006 07:53 AM
Powering Our Cities With Sea & River Water? hkskyline General Developments and Discussions 0 December 17th, 2005 07:22 AM
Major cities not situated on water Jennifat United States Urban Issues 29 August 20th, 2005 09:54 PM
First, Sun-belt cities takes people from the Great Lakes, now they want water there. Azn_chi_boi United States Urban Issues 41 July 29th, 2005 08:27 AM


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us