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Old July 28th, 2009, 02:51 PM   #101
Bombay Boy
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luckily we got some good monsoon rain in the last 2 weeks. lake levels are now near over-flow level

the weather sure is changing though. this is the weakest monsoon that i can remember
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Old July 30th, 2009, 03:48 PM   #102
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Melbourne the nation's driest capital
Peter Ker and Sarah-Jane Collins
July 30, 2009
MELBOURNE is carving a new reputation as Australia’s driest capital city, giving further credence to dire bushfire warnings for the coming summer.

As a leaked report warned that fire risk this season could exceed the catastrophic summer of 2009, Premier John Brumby called the state’s top fire officials to a private meeting late on Tuesday.

Mr Brumby is believed to have urged the officials from Victoria’s fire organisations to avoid parochialism and competitive tension between their agencies, as preparations for summer gather pace.

His call for unity was met with accord from those in the room.

The leaked report by the Department of Sustainability and Environment warned that sustained drought and the likelihood of further drying under an El Nino weather pattern had created a perilous environment for bushfires.

The report, by fire expert Paul Brockhoff, named Melbourne and its hinterlands as among Victoria’s driest and most at-risk regions.

Statistics released by the Bureau of Meteorology yesterday support the findings, with Melbourne clearly Australia’s most rain-starved capital city this year.

With just 158 millimetres falling in the city gauge, Melbourne has been almost twice as parched as the next driest city, Adelaide, which has received 307 millimetres since January 1.

Sydney has received more than four times as much rain as Melbourne, mocking Victoria’s reputation as ‘‘the garden state’’.

Mr Brockhoff’s report warned that the absence of rain had dried the Victorian landscape to such an extent that official methods for predicting fire behaviour could now prove inaccurate.

DSE fire chief Ewan Waller conceded that current conditions challenged fire prediction methods, but he insisted the department was not reviewing its methods.

‘‘Underestimations from the [modelling formula] can occur when we are in long-term drought conditions, in which case we always work with the Bureau of Meteorology to make marginal adjustments,’’ he said.

Mr Brumby yesterday said Victoria had a ‘‘single objective’’ to make the state ‘‘fire ready’’ for summer.

‘‘All of the advice at the moment is that this [summer] will be as bad, if not worse than anything we’ve seen in the last decade,’’ he said.

Mr Brumby said towns in high-risk locations were being identified across the state, and plans to protect them were being developed.

‘‘Individuals and their families will also need to focus on their own homes and their own farms and making them safer,’’ he said.

Nationals leader Peter Ryan said the DSE report painted ‘‘a pretty dire picture’’ and he accused the Government of lacking a co-ordinated response to the threat.

‘‘The Government has to better co-ordinate the message it is giving to Victorians as to how we as a state are going to combat the threat of fire,’’ he said.

‘‘At the moment it is happening on an incredibly ad hoc basis, it is confusing and alarming people.’’
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Old July 30th, 2009, 04:39 PM   #103
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I live in the Great Lakes region, water is one of our last concerns.
Also, if I remember correctly we can't sell it to anyone, not even other states!
It is all ours!!!!
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Old August 7th, 2009, 06:30 AM   #104
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Water crisis in parched northern China
3 August 2009
Agence France Presse

The river has dried up, the well yields only dust, and Li Yunxi is hard pressed to irrigate his plot of land, even though he lives right next to the largest water project in history.

The elderly farmer watches in despair as his corn crop wilts under the scorching northern China sun, knowing that a fresh, abundant stream is only a stone's throw away.

"We ordinary people don't dare use that water," Li told AFP as he nodded toward the fenced-in canal, part of China's hugely ambitious but troubled South-North Water Diversion Project.

"That water is for Beijing, and people here do not steal water."

The temperatures have approached 40 degrees centigrade (104 degrees Fahrenheit) for weeks this summer in Hebei province, a region surrounding Beijing that has been stricken by drought for much of the last decade.

But although Li's crops are withering away, he is getting no sympathy from the authorities -- quite the opposite.

Earlier this year the government announced that the completion of the project's central canal, stretching 1,300 kilometres (800 miles) from a tributary of the Yangtze river to Beijing, will be delayed five years to 2014.

This means that instead of being a beneficiary of the project, Hebei will now be tasked with supplying water to the capital until the project is completed.

The delay will further complicate a water shortage in northern China that experts say is caused by global warming, drought and rising demand from 96 million people who live in the booming Beijing region that includes Hebei.

Currently a 300-kilometre portion of the canal from the Hebei city of Shijiazhuang to Beijing is supplying emergency water to the capital from three reservoirs that previously provided water to the parched province.

The canal, which sits above Li's farmland, abruptly disappears as it nears the dry riverbed of the North Yishui river only to reappear on the opposite bank next to a large pump station that sucks the water through pipes underneath the dusty riverbed.

"There has been no water in the river for 30 years," the bronzed Li said, sweating under a straw hat, a partially capped silver tooth gleaming in the sunlight.

His family's well dried up about 10 years ago, so he like other villagers must now rely on water from a machine-pumped well -- and pay for it, making irrigation prohibitively expensive.

"At first the machine-pumped well was only 30 or 40 metres deep, now it is well over 100 metres deep," Li said of the falling underground water table, a phenomenon seen throughout north China.

This situation should have been alleviated by the water diversion project -- an unprecedented 400-billion-yuan (58-billion-dollar) plan to channel water from the humid south to the parched north along three separate lines.

"Now that (construction of the canal) has been pushed back for five years, we will see a deepening of the crisis in the North China region," said Zhang Junfeng, a water expert with Green Earth Volunteers, an environmental group.

"The North-South project was supposed to come on line earlier and it was designed to reduce the amount of underground water being used in urban areas."

The delay means that the region will have to rely on pumping more underground water to meet demand.

Zhang estimates that Beijing already pumps up to two thirds of its water from underground aquifers with wells in some place up to 1,000 metres deep.

Government officials with the South-North project and the Hebei water resources authority refused to be interviewed for this article.

But according to plans, in 2014 about 13 billion cubic metres (460 billion cubic feet) of water is expected to be channelled along the central canal from the Yangtze tributary every year, with one tenth earmarked for Beijing.

The rest will go to Hebei and other cities and regions along the route, while a significant amount will be lost to evaporation and leakage, the government has said.

Beijing's total water consumption in 2008 was 3.5 billion cubic metres, according to government figures.

According to state press reports, the delay in construction stems from the rising costs of the project as well as the resettlement of up to 300,000 people still living along the route of the canal.

Costly plants to treat badly polluted water along the project's eastern line have also put the construction and the delivery of water on that line behind schedule, they said.

A western line that was to transfer water from the headwaters of the Yangtze river to the Yellow river along the Tibetan plateau, which had been scheduled to break ground in 2010, has been postponed indefinitely, reports said.

If the western line is scrapped completely the overall cost of the project will fall significantly, they said.
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Old August 22nd, 2009, 08:36 AM   #105
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Obama administration official says California water woes are national priority
12 August 2009

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - California's ongoing water crisis is a major national priority, akin to restoring the Chesapeake Bay or Florida's Everglades, a top Obama administration official said Wednesday.

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar will hold a public meeting in Washington next month to discuss plans to restore the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the freshwater estuary that supplies drinking water to two-thirds of Californians and is one of the most vital wildlife habitats on the West Coast, Deputy Interior Secretary David Hayes said.

Hayes was in Sacramento to update farmers, city dwellers and environmentalists about federal efforts to free up water for crops and fisheries, and to preside over the latest round of water fights as the state hobbles through its third year of drought.

"California's delta is as important a national resource as the Everglades, or the Great Lakes in the Midwest, or the Chesapeake Bay," Hayes said. "Not only is it a crucial ecosystem that is in peril, but more than 20 million Americans in the most populated state in the nation rely on it for their drinking water. The status quo is not sustainable."

Water is a precious resource in California. In recent years, legal battles over dwindling supplies have interrupted and reduced irrigation flows to the San Joaquin Valley, which supplies much of the nation's produce, forcing farmers to fallow hundreds of thousands of acres and idle farmworkers.

Low rainfall also has meant there is less water in the delta and rivers to sustain native fish, which has resulted in the cancellation of commercial salmon fishing season for the past two years.

In late June, Salazar traveled to Fresno, the heart of the valley, and assigned Hayes to help find solutions to ease the toll of the state's water shortage on growers.

Since then, the government has directed millions in stimulus funds to the federal Central Valley Project, which manages the dams and canals that move water around the state, and to farmers to build more than 90 new wells to pump more groundwater.

Still, in valley towns where lines for emergency rations of rice, dried beans and canned goods have at times stretched for a block, officials warned that wasn't enough to put jobless families back to work.

Fifty mayors are calling for President Barack Obama to visit the area himself, saying three years of drought coupled with court-ordered protections for threatened fish species have sapped critical irrigation supplies.

Hayes said relaxing protections for endangered species would not solve the state's water woes. Solutions need to restore the delta ecosystem as a whole.

"This ecosystem is one of the jewels of the West Coast," Hayes said. "Some new engineering may be what saves California."

State and federal agencies are evaluating several conservation strategies for the estuary, including a controversial proposal that could cost up to $17 billion to build a canal to move water around the ecosystem.

Speaking before Hayes at Wednesday's meeting, residents of the fragile delta islands said they feared those plans ignored their livelihoods and communities.

Environmentalists and fishermen said any federal solutions should prioritize safeguarding vulnerable native species, expecially the record-low numbers of chinook salmon that once flourished off the coasts of California and Oregon.

Gary Bobker, program director of the Bay Institute, a nonprofit environmental organization, said the delta "has a compromised immune system and any one of the stressors could push it over the edge."
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Old August 22nd, 2009, 04:38 PM   #106
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marrakech morocco is an amazing city and very green but it is located in a semi arid region
all this suburban sprawl malls hotels new homes resorts plazas mosques even churches that are being built and so many new parks gold courses
one day they will realize OH SHIT NO MORE WATER !!
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Old August 22nd, 2009, 07:16 PM   #107
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It happens in Israel as well. The water supply is still fine but water is now more expensive and a few billion $ are spent on water desalination. The annual water consumption in Israel is around 2 billion cubic meters and the plan is to desalinate around 450 million cubic meters in 2012 and even more later.
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Old September 4th, 2009, 06:16 AM   #108
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Kenya's rural drought hurts the big city: power cuts, high food prices create urban despair
26 August 2009

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) - Crops have shriveled, hundreds of cattle are dead and the World Food Program said 3.8 million Kenyans need emergency food aid because of a prolonged drought, which is even causing electrical blackouts in the capital.

With rivers thinning to a trickle and mountaintop glaciers shrinking, there's not enough water to fully run hydroelectric plants. Authorities this month began rationing power in the capital, darkening homes and businesses at least three days a week.

In Nairobi's posh, leafy neighborhoods, light bulbs flicker as generators rumble to life. Gym treadmills in luxury hotels jolt to a halt.

The slums, where roughly half the capital's 4 million residents live, are being hit the worst. Taps have run dry and residents often wait for days for trucks to deliver expensive potable water.

Business owners say they're losing money, harming Kenya's rebound from the violent aftermath of a 2007 presidential election that eviscerated the economy and killed more than 1,000 people.

In Nairobi's Kosovo slum, hotel manager Irungu wa Kogi said he's already laid off two waiters. Before the power cuts, the main attraction at his small, tin-roofed hotel was a television. Now the television -- and the restaurant -- are silent.

"A lot of young men are becoming unemployed and they can't provide for their families," he said. "Crime will definitely go up."

Prime Minister Raila Odinga this month warned of a "catastrophe" if seasonal rains don't come in October ad November, expressing fear that inter-clan violence could ensue. Kenya's grain harvest is expected to be 28 percent lower. Food prices have jumped by as much as 130 percent.

In Nairobi's sprawling Kibera slum, tailor Joseph Owino, 40, said he expects that power cuts and customer's financial problems will slash his income this month by some 80 percent, to less than US$12 (euro8.38). He and his six children now eat a meager breakfast of maize meal and black tea and skip lunch.

"We buy hoofs which have been thrown away and cook them with vegetables so that it has a meaty taste," he said. "Don't even ask me the last time I drank a soda."

In the parched countryside, its even worse. In many places, the air stinks of rotting cattle carcasses.

Peruan Lesakut, a Maasai herdsman, said he had 120 cattle in July but now has only 56, all emaciated.

"I cannot sell my animals," he said. "I will stay here until they all die."

Eunice Wairimu's maize, bean and potato harvests on her small farm in Laikipia, 125 miles (200 kilometers) north of Nairobi, have failed for the past three years. The 45-year-old relies on handouts from the U.N.'s World Food Program.

"I can't say the last time I used sugar or ate meat," she said in her one-room home.

Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan environmentalist, told The Associated Press she is worried about Kenya's future.

"We see carcasses of animals everywhere," said Maathai, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her work in conservation, women's rights and clean government. "You could easily see carcasses of people everywhere."

The WFP has called for US$230 million (euro160.58 million) in donations to feed hungry Kenyans.

"Life has never been easy for the poor in Kenya, but right now conditions are more desperate than they have been for a decade," said Burkard Oberle, WFP's Kenya Country Director, on Tuesday.

WFP already is providing emergency food aid to some 2.5 million Kenyans, but another 1.3 million still need help, said spokeswoman Gabrielle Menezes.
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Old May 21st, 2011, 06:35 PM   #109
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Frigid weather knocks out water in El Paso
7 February 2011

EL PASO, Texas (AP) - El Paso's mayor declared a water emergency Sunday to stiffen enforcement of a ban that restricts residents and businesses from using water for anything but drinking.

Mayor John Cook took the step after frigid temperatures put some of El Paso's water distribution network out of commission, prompting a water shortage.

The emergency proclamation allows the city to cut off water service to customers found to have violated the restrictions. Hospitals and other emergency services are exempt. A citywide alert continues urging the public to boil water before drinking.

A statement issued by the city says the restrictions will remain in effect indefinitely.

Some improvement had been seen in reservoir levels Sunday, City Manager Joyce Wilson told the El Paso Times on Sunday. However, El Paso Water Utilities customers have been asked to boil their drinking water and refrain from showering, using dishwaters, washing cars and other activities that might use large quantities of water.

"The bottom line is there are still a lot of breaks and leaks throughout the system," Wilson said. "The water demand, in terms of what they are pumping, is still very high compared to what it should be."

The 72 hours of sub-freezing temperatures in El Paso is unique in recent history, Wilson said.

"This has impacted everything. This community was not built for sustained sub-freezing temperatures," she said.

Meanwhile, in South Texas, marine biologists and volunteers worked urgently to try to save hundreds of sea turtles left stunned by the frigid conditions along the beaches of South Padre Island and Boca Chica, near the mouth of the Rio Grande.

Rescuers had found 575 sea turtles in hypothermic shock because of the weather, said Kat Lillie of Sea Turtle Inc. That was nearly double the record set in the 1980s, she said. Twenty died, however, and the toll was expected to rise, said Jeff George, a curator with the nonprofit turtle rescue group.

Most of the inert turtles were found on the beach, but some were rescued from the cold surf, Lillie said.

"We saved as many as possible, but there are places we couldn't access," she told the Valley Morning Star of Harlingen, Texas, for a story in Sunday editions.

Most will be released once the Gulf of Mexico surf warms, George said.

However, Super Bowl fans trying to catch flights home from Sunday's game should not find any weather-related complications, an American Airlines spokeswoman said.

There have been no flight cancellations at Fort Worth, Texas-based American's base at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and few at its hub at Chicago O'Hare International Airport, said spokeswoman Mary Sanderson. Most of the inclement weather expected for Monday was expected to pass between the two hubs, she said.

However, she urged travelers to arrive at DFW three hours before flight time to pass through security because of the surge of homeward-bound passengers expected at the airport.

Warming weather was leaving the rest of Texas to deal with widespread water pipe breaks as more frigid temperatures loom for North and West Texas at midweek, along with the promise of sleet and snow for North Texas.

------

Information from: El Paso Times, http://www.elpasotimes.com
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Old May 26th, 2011, 06:32 PM   #110
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Chennai water tankers suck suburbs dry
26 May 2011
The Times of India

CHENNAI: The soaring heat and the rising demand for water in the city have water tankers making a beeline to the suburbs and exploiting groundwater and farm wells. This has raised concerns among farmers in the agricultural villages bordering the city.

Suburban residents are also concerned about the steep fall in groundwater levels. Residential areas such as Medavakkam, Pallikaranai, Tambaram, Chitlapakkam, Old Pallavaram, Zamin Royapettah, Hastinapuram, Chromepet, Selaiyur and Puli Koradu face severe water shortage. Residents here get water once in a fortnight.

The local bodies of Perungudi, Okkiyam-Thoraipakkam, Karapakkam, Sholinganallur, Semmancheri and Navalur on the Old Mahabalipuram Road are ill-equipped to provide water as they are short of manpower and funds. Residents recall that when they moved into the locality a decade ago, water was available at a depth of 10 feet. Today, many don't find a trace of water at 100 feet, because of extraction of water from wells by tankers.

With the sowing season about to began, farmers are a concerned lot. There are more than a dozen agricultural villages around the city including Kovilambakkam, Nanmangalam, Sittalapakkam, Perumbakkam, Kundrathur, Gowl Bazaar, Polizhalur, Madambakkam, Vengaivasal, Madurapakkam and Agaram Then, where paddy is cultivated in large tracks of land for centuries. Farming is still a major occupation in many villages including Sholinganallur and Ottiyambakkam. Paddy cultivation is done on 8,000 acres in the suburbs, especially around Tambaram and off OMR. The area of cultivation used to be 12,000 acres a few years ago. Depletion of water resources is a big reason for the shrinking of farmlands in the suburbs.

Every day around 500 tanker lorries operate on OMR. They take water from farm wells of adjoining areas and supply water to residential areas in the city and software companies on the IT Corridor. "This is a perennial problem for us. We conserve water to use it for summer for farming, but tanker lorries take away all the water, drying up aquifiers" said K Sakthivel, a resident in Sholinganallur.

Lorries make hundreds of trips to many areas around the city targeting farm wells. Each farm well, on an average, is 50 feet deep and a tanker-lorry has a capacity of 12,000 litres. A farm well owner is paid Rs 60 - Rs 70 per load which is then sold for twelve times higher the price to buyers. While private tankers operating in the southern suburbs cater to the needs of software companies and residential areas along OMR and the city, lorries in Poonamallee and Ambattur supply water to hotels, companies and residential areas in the city.

Tanker lorry operators had another argument. "The existing water supply by Metrowater is limited. Our role is crucial in bridging that gap," said N Nijalingam, president, South Chennai Private Tanker Lorry Owners' Association.
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Old November 8th, 2011, 06:13 AM   #111
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China invests billions to avert water crisis
AFP Excerpt
Wed, Oct 12, 2011

China is to invest up to 4 trillion yuan ($600 billion) over the next decade to overcome a huge water shortage that threatens the country's economic growth, a senior official said on Wednesday.

The vice minister of water resources said China's unbridled economic growth had left up to 40 percent of its rivers badly polluted and the country faced "huge pressures" on supplies of water.

*********************************

Over 46,000 reservoirs in China need to be rebuilt or reinforced to ensure that surrounding farmlands and communities are safe from flooding and have enough water for irrigation, he said.

More funding would also be needed to protect the reservoir of the $22.5 billion Three Gorges Dam -- the world's largest -- from geological disasters and pollution, he said.

*********************************

Jiao also said the government would build more water transfer projects and hydroelectric dams and strengthen efforts to ensure the supply of safe drinking water.

China's north suffers regular droughts, while annual flooding wreaks havoc on farm areas in the south.

The government is building a huge $60 billion south-to-north project that aims to divert water to the drought stricken region around China's capital, Beijing.
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Old November 10th, 2011, 02:33 AM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by socrates#1fan View Post
I live in the Great Lakes region, water is one of our last concerns.
Also, if I remember correctly we can't sell it to anyone, not even other states!
It is all ours!!!!

This is correct

http://www.greatlakeslaw.org/blog/great_lakes_compact/

But I wouldn't mind selling some of Lake Michigan's water to our western states... For a very very high price

If anyone is interested in the Great Lakes water levels
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/now/wlevels/levels.html
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for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
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Old March 14th, 2012, 06:16 PM   #113
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Serious water shortage hits Luanda
AFP
Fri, Feb 17, 2012

The water utility in Angola's capital vowed Friday to repair a burst water main within days, to end severe shortages that have lasted a week across much of Luanda.

Residents have to trek long distances to find water, which is so scarce that prices have doubled this week due to the shortage, jumping from 7,000 to as much as 14,000 kwanzas ($70 to $140) for a cistern full.

The increase was even steeper for 25-litre containers, soaring from 20 to 50 kwanzas in some neighbourhoods.

"The shortage is due to a maintenance problem in an aqueduct serving the capital... worsened when a construction company ruptured a main," said water utility Epal's spokesman Domingos Pacienca.

"Epal is is doing everything possible to repair the damaged main so that the people won't suffer shortages," he added, vowing to restore the system to normal by Sunday.

Normal is especially relative in this city of seven million, where most people live without running water or electricity.

The UN children's agency UNICEF estimates that 87 percent of the urban population lives in shacks, even though the nation's oil riches have given Angola one of the world's fastest-growing economies.
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Old March 14th, 2012, 06:18 PM   #114
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Water shortage a global threat without urgent reform: OECD
AFP
Wed, Mar 7, 2012

Urgent reforms to raise efficiency in the way water is used around the world are needed to avert serious shortages in the next decades, and markets in water can help, the OECD said on Wednesday.

In about 40 years' time more than four out of 10 people in the world may be living in river areas in the grip of severe shortage, it warned.

"Efficient use of water is essential, and pricing it properly can discourage waste," the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development said.

"Economic instruments such as water markets can help to achieve this in a flexible way."

The OECD, a forum and source of advice on policy in many fields for governments in advanced countries, was commenting on the release of a study it published called Meeting the Water Reform Challenge ahead of a world water forum in Marseille, southern France, on Tuesday.

The organisation warned that reform was needed urgently "if the world is to head off serious deterioration in the quality and quantity of water available."

OECD secretary general Angel Gurria warned that "without major policy changes, we risk high costs to economic growth, human health, and the environment."

But much could be done, he said. "Economic instruments like tariffs, taxes and transfers -- the 3Ts -- are powerful tools to ensure an efficient use of water."

The report pointed to some of the factors raising pressure on water resources, citing rapid urbanisation, population growth and changing economic dynamics for managing water supply.

Competition for the use of sources of water would increase because demand was forecast to rise by 55 percent up to 2050.

"By that time, 3.9 billion people -- more than 40 percent of the world's population -- are likely to be living in river basins facing severe water stress."

More than 240 million people, living for the most part in rural areas, would probably not have improved access to water by 2050 and nearly 1.4 billion people would not have basic sanitation.

Increased pollution from agriculture and poor treatment of waste would contaminate ground water, rivers and oceans.

"Governments should pay closer attention to the way in which their water, energy, agriculture and environmental policies interact," the OECD advised.
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Old March 14th, 2012, 08:02 PM   #115
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Its a sad situation in a lot of place of the world. But here in Brazil are 12% of all freshwater on the planet and as in most Brazilian cities, the water in my town is never lacking.
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Old May 2nd, 2012, 05:09 AM   #116
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Beijing to see acute water shortage in 2012
Updated: 2012-04-24 12:21
(Xinhua)

BEIJING - Beijing is expected to face a water shortage of 1.3 billion cubic meters in 2012, accounting for a third of the city's annual water usage, according to local water authorities.

The municipal government will work to keep the capital's water consumption within 3.7 billion cubic meters this year, as only 2.4 billion cubic meters will be supplied by local water resources, Cheng Jing, head of the Beijing Water Authority, said Monday.

The gap is expected to be bridged via a combination of measures, including the use of recycled water, water diversion and moderate exploitation of underground water, Cheng said.

Beijing has been plagued by droughts for 13 consecutive years, with its fast-paced economic development and ever-growing population exacerbating the water shortage, according to Cheng.

The available per capita water usage in Beijing has dropped to 100 cubic meters, about one-tenth of the internationally acknowledged warning level.

Local authorities have tightened water management by setting a ceiling for the city's annual water consumption at 4 billion cubic meters by 2015.
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Old June 16th, 2012, 06:20 AM   #117
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India's capital in water crisis after supplies cut
AFP
15 June 2012

Large parts of New Delhi were struggling with acute water shortages on Friday after a neighbouring state cut its supplies at the peak of summer, officials said.

The sprawling Indian capital, with a population of 16 million sweltering in 43 degree C (109.4 F) summer heat, relies on four neighbouring states for its water -- Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab and Uttarakhand.

Haryana, the biggest supplier, cut its flow to the city on Thursday and about three million people have suffered shortages or been completely cut off, according to the Delhi Jal Board, a government agency responsible for water supply.

Some of the capital's smartest districts are among the affected areas, and the crisis reflects growing water stresses in the country of 1.2 billion people.

"Suddenly, Haryana is refusing to release water to Delhi," a top Delhi Jal Board official told AFP, requesting anonymity.

"We are struggling at all levels. Every minute we are registering complaints of water shortage. This crisis has left us in a mess."

Several states across India face major challenges over water supply, triggering long-running legal battles over water sharing.

Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit accused Haryana, which says it has to conserve water for its own residents, of "playing foul" with the capital.

"We are not asking for any favours. We want what is due to us," Dikshit said in a statement Thursday.

In the peak of summer, New Delhi needs 1,100 million gallons of water every day, according to the Delhi Jal Board, but public water providers are able to only supply 835 million gallons.

"There is always a supply-demand gap but this gap is just widening and worsening the crisis," said Himanshu Thakkar, an expert on water management at the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People research group in New Delhi.

According to a federal government report on water consumption in 2010, usage per capita in Delhi is higher than in most European cities.

"Delhi is a privileged city, it is a spoilt child. It does not use rain water harvesting, refuses to recharge 600 water bodies (reservoirs) and just chooses to complain about shortages," said Thakkar.

A 2011 study by experts published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a US journal, estimated that more than one billion urban Indians will face serious water shortages by 2050.

India's six biggest cities -- Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata, Bangalore, Chennai and Hyderabad -- are among those most affected by the shortages.
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Old June 27th, 2012, 11:52 AM   #118
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Need to use water judiciously: experts
Hindustan Times
Fri 15 Jun, 2012

New Delhi, June 15 -- At a time when the city is reeling under acute water shortage, experts have questioned the use of the precious commodity for non-essential purposes, especially for nondrinking use.

While some question the Delhi Jal Board (DJB) for setting up a packaged drinking water bottling plant and selling branded water, others rue the use of treated water for golf courses and water parks.

"Delhi is a water-scarce state... Why should DJB run a bottling plant" said Himanshu Thakkar, an environmentalist.

DJB's plant at Greater Kailash bottles about 3.5 lakh litres per day into 20-litre, 2-litres, 1.5-litre, 1-litre and even 500 ml jars.

The DJB calls it a "minuscule" amount, but experts say that in times of scarcity, even 100 litres per person would benefit 3,500 persons directly.

"There is a reason for the Greater Kailash plant. When it was started, the Sonia Vihar plant was not operational and many south Delhi areas did not get adequate water," said a DJB spokesperson. The facility is benefiting consumers even today, the DJB official argued.

Golf courses and water parks, both catering to a niche segment, are known water guzzlers and targets of environmentalists. The average water consumption of an 18-hole golf course is 1 lakh litres per day. There are a minimum of eight golf courses in Delhi and at least six water parks.

Environmentalist Manoj Misra of Yamuna Jiye Abhiyan agreed, "Fresh treated water should not at all be used for nonpotable needs. Only re-cycled water should be used."

But the DJB said it can hardly do anything about it. "Golf course land does not belong to us and hence that is not in our purview," the spokesperson said.
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Old July 27th, 2013, 08:42 AM   #119
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Houston, Dallas, Austin mayors voice support for $2 billion measure to finance water projects
Associated Press
20 February 2013

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) - The mayors of Houston, Dallas and Austin told lawmakers on Tuesday that they support a proposed $2 billion fund to finance water projects across the state and would like to see less red tape and more conservation efforts.

Houston Mayor Annise Parker told the House Natural Resources Committee that she supports using money from the Rainy Day Fund to create a water development bank that would help local authorities build new water projects and finance conservation efforts. Houston has invested in numerous water projects and delivers 495 million gallons a day to 470,000 customers.

Parker said the fund would help the rest of the state make sure there is enough water for Texas' growing population.

"If the rest of the state doesn't make the same significant investment that we have, then we are out there by ourselves, and we may lose our competitive edge as a state going into the future," she said.

The committee was hearing testimony on House Bill 4, a proposal by Rep. Alan Ritter, R-Nederland, to create a revolving, $2 billion fund that the State Water Development Board would use to leverage financing for water projects. The board says Texans need to spend $53 billion over the next 50 years to make sure the state has enough water for a growing population, with half of the money coming from the state.

Luke Metzger, director of the advocacy group Environment Texas, told the Senate Natural Resources Committee on Tuesday that it was critical that the state emphasizes conservation and ensures enough water is left behind for the eco-system. He pointed out that large-scale water projects, such as new reservoirs, can have a negative impact on the environment.

"In 1968, the State Water Plan predicted that by the year 2020 you would need 32 million acre-feet of water. Of course it's almost 2020 now, and we're only using 18 million acre-feet," he said. "It's critical that in planning for the next 50 years, we are flexible and we're careful not to burden Texans in the future with huge debts for projects we might not need."

He pointed out that San Antonio grew by more than 65 percent while still using the same amount of water and said other cities could follow that model. He said plans are for the state to meet 34 percent of future water needs through conservation and called on the committee to set aside that much of the new water fund for projects that save water.

Just fixing leaky water mains could save enough water for 2.7 million Texans, Metzger said.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings called on lawmakers to change the permitting process to make it easier and cheaper to build new water facilities. He cited the experience of Dallas, which tried to build a new reservoir on the Neches River called Lake Fastrill.

The city spent millions of dollars on developing the project, filing permits and ultimately on litigation, only to have the U.S. Supreme Court rule against the city, killing the project.

"The lengthy permitting process creates a situation where local governments must make a wager on getting water," Rawlings said. "If we don't deal with these water needs, in 2060 it will cost us about half a million jobs in the area and $64 billion in projected income."

So far no group has come out against creating what would be called the State Water Infrastructure Fund for Texas, or SWIFT. But the measure may require Republican lawmakers to vote in favor of lifting the state's constitutional spending limit, which many conservatives do not want on their record.

Lawmakers feel a new urgency in dealing with the state's water shortage following the worst single-year drought in the state's history in 2011. Much of the state remains in drought and experts warn that it may continue and become the worst multi-year drought on record.

Austin Mayor Lee Leffingwell also testified Tuesday in support of the water fund, saying it would eliminate the need to charge a fee for every water tap in the state.

Jim Parks, executive director of the North Texas Municipal Water District, explained to lawmakers that his system currently serves 1.6 million customers and is projected to serve 3.8 million in 50 years. He said the authority has convinced customers to reduce water usage by 12 percent through an education project, but at the same time one of the district's reservoirs, Lake Texhoma, is currently off-limits because of an invasive species.

He also said the new fund needs less red tape than current ones, which he said discourages his district from using them.

--------

On the Internet:

House Bill 4: http://www.legis.state.tx.us/BillLoo...ess83R&BillHB4

Senate Bill 4: http://www.legis.state.tx.us/BillLoo...ess83R&BillSB4
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Old July 27th, 2013, 01:22 PM   #120
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We have no shortage of water in Rotterdam. IN order to prevent flooding of streets in heavy rain, we build storage areas for rainwater in some of our buildings and in this underground parking garage:

[IMG]http://i44.************/dqno04.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i39.************/2uj1183.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i41.************/2vkx40h.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i40.************/54eq89.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i41.************/illjd1.jpg[/IMG]
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