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Old October 19th, 2010, 10:38 AM   #1481
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And here's for stats for the last 12 months



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Old October 19th, 2010, 02:44 PM   #1482
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Great performance by Durban and CT to get into double digits...Joburg doing well too! Great to see CT back over 8m and Durbs approaching 4.7m.

September 2010 is the 2nd best month ever for Durban
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 05:15 PM   #1483
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SA Express has applied for 14 weekly frequencies to Lilongwe. Seems like a lot of flights for that route. Good to see their regional expansion but I wonder if SAA is planning to hand this route over to them.
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Old October 23rd, 2010, 12:00 PM   #1484
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That would be a good move on both SAA and SAX side, as at the moment the SA Malawi operations is the only regional destinations not served by daily flights. Not sure though if frequency is limited. Currently SAA operates 5x weekly flights to LLW and 2x weekly to Blantyre.
Would be good then if this could be replaced with more frequent flights, albeit with smaller aircraft, at least daily (or then up to double-daily) to LLW and then SAX should try to get daily flights to BLZ as well.
Then it would also leave more availability for SAA to use the aircraft somewhere else.
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Old October 29th, 2010, 12:37 PM   #1485
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South Africa - Qatar bilaterals adjusted

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-fo....main/4968390/

As per the link, airlines are now allowed to operate 28 dailiy flights between South Africa (14x JNB, 7x CPT and 7X DUR) and Doha. Lets see if Qatar Airways uses these new options.
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Old October 29th, 2010, 01:02 PM   #1486
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dam you beat me to the post Cigar. i shat my pants out of excitement. does this mean that Qatar have applied for the DUR route?... if this is announced i expect a influx of foreign airlines into DUR
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Old October 29th, 2010, 04:33 PM   #1487
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dam you beat me to the post Cigar. i shat my pants out of excitement. does this mean that Qatar have applied for the DUR route?... if this is announced i expect a influx of foreign airlines into DUR
No, it means that they have the possibility to fly it. They will still need to apply to their local authority for permission but given that they have no competition they would get it if they want it.

That said, I wouldn't be surprised to see Durban tagged onto the Joburg flight if they start a non-stop to Cape Town. They currently operate Cape Town as an add-on to their Joburg flight.
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Old October 29th, 2010, 06:07 PM   #1488
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Hello. Advice please.

Has anybody travelled between CDG and Orly Airports in Paris? How long did it take you? Train? Bus?

Cheers
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Old October 29th, 2010, 08:31 PM   #1489
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Hello. Advice please.

Has anybody travelled between CDG and Orly Airports in Paris? How long did it take you? Train? Bus?

Cheers
It was a long time ago, but there is a direct bus. Generally, airport transport in Paris is expensive!
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Old October 29th, 2010, 11:12 PM   #1490
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i think it takes around 45 mins
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Old October 30th, 2010, 05:41 AM   #1491
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Quote:
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Hello. Advice please.

Has anybody travelled between CDG and Orly Airports in Paris? How long did it take you? Train? Bus?

Cheers
its a ball ache and depends what time of the day you attempt it. Paris has the worst rush hour congestion in Europe.
Direct bus service around the eastern side of the city
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Old October 30th, 2010, 12:41 PM   #1492
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Interesting on the qatar news. does that mean they didn't have rights 8m fly to dbn previously?
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Old October 30th, 2010, 11:48 PM   #1493
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It was a long time ago, but there is a direct bus. Generally, airport transport in Paris is expensive!
I might only have 3 hours to get between the two, I suppose 1 hour given check-in is 1 hour before plane leaves Orly.
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Old November 1st, 2010, 11:40 AM   #1494
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anyone got pics of the 1time that caught fire?

heard the passengers were really moronic when asked to perform an emergency exit, many of them getting their stuff from the over heard compartments instead of evacuating... "oh fire, wait I need my make up bag first, I cant slide down that shoot looking like this"
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Old November 1st, 2010, 02:36 PM   #1495
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Old November 3rd, 2010, 06:25 PM   #1496
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Jet, S African Airways plan tie-up

Nirbhay Kumar
Posted: Wednesday, Nov 03, 2010 at 2309 hrs IST
Updated: Wednesday, Nov 03, 2010 at 2309 hrs IST

New Delhi: The country's largest private carrier Jet Airways has proposed to enter into a marketing alliance with South African Airways. The airline is awaiting regulatory approval for the tie-up which would help the two carriers sell each other’s tickets on Mumbai-Johannesburg besides connecting other onward destinations, industry sources said.

“The two carriers would code-share on the trunk Mumbai-Johannesburg route. The issue is currently pending with civil aviation ministry," a Jet Airways official said.

Jet seeks to provide its customers the option to fly with South African Airways for onward connectivity to cities such as Cape Town and Durban. The proposed agreement would allow the South African Airlines passengers to book tickets on Jet Airways' network in India. “The flight is not doing as we had expected at the time of its launch. On an average we are seeing a occupancy of 60-70% on the flight. The code-share with the South African carrier would help us get more passengers,” the official said.

It generally takes about 16-18 months to break-even on long-haul routes such as Mumbai-Johannesburg. The airline had launched the flight in April this year with its A330-200 aircraft. The traffic on India-South Africa route is higher during the winter.

"There is not sufficient traffic for two airlines on India-South Africa route. Jet is losing more money on this route than what it had expected but it must have factored in this," Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation (CAPA) India head Kapil Kaul said. Jet Airways had introduced the flight hoping to get tourist and business traffic on the route which is growing at about 8-10% annually.

"Going forward I expect South African Airways to pull out from Mumbai-Johannesburg. They have already reduced frequency on this route," Kaul added.

Jet Airways chief commercial officer Sudheer Raghavan had told FE that the airline was looking to add flights where the break-even time was shorter and not on the sectors which required a waiting of 12-18 month to become profitable.

http://www.financialexpress.com/news...tie-up/706162/
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Old November 15th, 2010, 11:50 AM   #1497
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Cape Town is also cool in winter

Posted November 15th, 2010 by Gigi Edross

By Guy Lundy, Ian Bartes and Rashid Toefy

Following soon after the very successful hosting of the 2010 World Cup, which saw the building of world class hotels and other visitor infrastructure, occupancies in Cape Town have fallen into a deep trough. This is not unusual in Cape Town, which has always suffered from wild swings in passenger arrivals, hotel occupancies and restaurant profits between summer and winter.



This makes Cape Town unique in South Africa, however, with other cities experiencing much more consistent arrivals and occupancies, and it makes it very difficult for the hospitality industry to be sustainable. Owners and operators need to invest for capacity that can carry the numbers in summer, but must then survive through the depths of winter. This is one of the reasons that restaurants come and go so often in Cape Town. With 18 five-star hotels now operating in the city, we must find a way of increasing numbers of visitors during our winter period.



One of the reasons for the seasonality phenomenon in Cape Town is that we have always been seen, and continue to be perceived as, simply a leisure destination. Even publications that aim to promote Cape Town as an investment and business destination always seem to have pictures of the Waterfront, Clifton and the Winelands on their covers. Very seldom do they show conference facilities, factories or office blocks. The combination of a focus on leisure and the perception that the Cape’s winter is too awful to contemplate ensure that passenger arrivals fall off a cliff from April to May, ending up at less than half of the numbers in December and January.



If Cape Town is to grow as a global African city, it must be taken seriously as a business destination on the world map. This city offers just about everything the business traveller needs - none of which are affected by the seasons - including an award-winning airport, good shipping access, first-rate hotels, well developed infrastructure, world-class technology, some of the finest restaurants and entertainment, natural beauty, sophisticated business networks and a favourable time zone for trade with Europe, the Middle East and Africa.


A very important factor that it lacks, though, is enough direct international flights to meet business travellers’ requirements. However, this is as much a symptom of Cape Town not being seen as a serious business destination as it is a cause of globally active business people not basing themselves here. While business people need direct flights, airlines need business travellers who sit at the front of the plane – and high numbers of travellers all year round – to make direct flights financially viable.


Especially in an environment of economic downturn like the past few years, when global passenger volumes have collapsed and fare prices have dropped even faster, airlines need the security of a daily flight throughout the year to achieve economies of scale and lower costs per flight. It is very difficult to justify establishing offices and ground operations in a city where money is only made during six months of the year, although some airlines, like Lufthansa and Virgin, do even though they reduce or stop their flights altogether during the winter months. It can take up to three years to develop a viable route, so one-off spikes like that experienced with this year’s FIFA World Cup are not enough to encourage immediate growth.


Cape Town therefore needs to take a hard look at what can and should be done to grow the number of business travellers in and out of Cape Town year-round, as well as to ensure that more leisure travellers come to the city in mid-winter.
The Western Cape has for some years been considered a great destination for meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibitions (MICE), or what has increasingly become known worldwide as ‘business tourism’. The building of the world-renowned Cape Town International Convention Centre gave the industry new impetus after 2003 and the recent exposure during the World Cup will undoubtedly raise it another notch. After less than a decade, the CTICC is today ranked as the 34th busiest convention centre in the world for international association meetings and conferences. With plans at an advanced stage to double its capacity in the next few years, it aims to get into the world’s top 10.
The wonderful thing about conferences and exhibitions is that they can take place at any time of year. In fact they’re possibly better suited to winter since most activities take place indoors. The World Economic Forum in May and the Time/Fortune/CNN Global Forum that took place at the same time as the World Cup are good illustrations of this. Conference delegates tend to stay for shorter periods than leisure visitors, but they tend to spend more per day (it is they who will make those 18 five star hotels viable, not leisure visitors alone) and they very often come back for holidays with their families at a later stage.

To achieve growth in the conferencing and exhibition scene, the Western Cape must tap further into the industries that have a natural home in the Cape, such as food and wine, oil and gas, boatbuilding and ship repair, design, film, technology, renewable energy, business process outsourcing, medical research or asset management.
Conference venues in the Winelands, the Overberg and the West Coast can capitalise on the tranquillity and brilliant green landscapes of winter, which contrast spectacularly with the brown and burnt countryside found further north during this time of the year. Couple this with images of red wines being drunk in thatched cottages by roaring fireplaces, and we can start to blend business and pleasure in a most agreeable way.
The Irish and Scottish have been marketing terrible weather very effectively for centuries. Ireland’s “Emerald Isle” is as effective a rebranding as was the name change from the Cape of Storms to the Cape of Good Hope; it is emerald green because it seldom stops raining. While our wines substitute for the whisky and Guinness of those countries, our local cuisine wins hands down – Haggis and potatoes simply can’t compete with crayfish and roast lamb.

We must stop telling ourselves (and seemingly anyone else who will listen) that we have terrible, wet and cold winters. It took the success of the World Cup to awaken many Capetonians and visitors to how vibrant and fun the city can be during this time. Five of the eight matches that we hosted were in glorious sunshine. We should instead be working together more effectively to market our “green season” to business and leisure travellers alike.

This cool and green season actually has significant appeal to travellers from several markets that we currently don’t focus on. From June to August, places like the Middle East, Singapore and Hong Kong become unbearably hot and humid. People living in those areas develop a desperate yearning for rain, snowy mountains and fresh, green fields. Australia and New Zealand have recognised this and have been cashing in on Asian travellers during their winter seasons for some time.

With the world changing around us at breakneck speed, it’s probably time we started looking more seriously at actively targeting new source markets. Cape Town’s biggest source markets are still the (heavily indebted) UK, Germany, the USA and the Netherlands. But if the Airbus Global Marketing Forecast is to be believed, Sub-Saharan African growth in air traffic is expected to be higher than much of the rest of the world over the next 20 years. There are however still very few direct flights from Cape Town to other African destinations. If we are to truly establish ourselves as a gateway to Africa, then this pattern must change.

Some flights have recently been established between Cape Town and new regional destinations like Luanda and the Seychelles. Both of these destinations are good examples of flights being introduced due to business demand. The Luanda flight is a reaction to the growth of Cape Town as a regional services hub for the African oil and gas exploration industry, and the demand for the Seychelles flight has come about as a result of phenomenal growth in demand for island property by Cape Town-based buyers. Yields on these routes must remain high for them to become fully established and for frequencies to be increased.


One possible way to do this, especially in winter, is to position Cape Town as a major retail destination for devoted shoppers. In comparison to Europe, Asia and the United States, we have very little in the way of big end of season sales. There is definitely room to create a “Great Cape Town Sale” in July and August, when everything, from accommodation to restaurants to trousers and blouses, is marked down. Much like similar co-ordinated efforts in New York, Paris and Singapore, we could attract plane loads of affluent bargain hunters from the African continent, the Middle East and even as far away as Latin America.

The City of Cape Town has also acknowledged that hosting major events throughout the year is critical to unlocking economic growth for the city and levelling out seasonality. It has even put together an events advisory committee, although unfortunately it has not been forthcoming with critical funding to support these big events in a significant way.

The City must develop a more aggressive approach to keeping existing and attracting new big events that support our aspirations as a global city. We are up against competitors around the world, including Johannesburg and Durban (which is now positioning itself as “Africa’s Sporting and Events Capital”), who are willing to throw large sums of money at event organisers. Although a 2020 Olympic bid is on hold for now (largely due to SASCOC’s highly questionable process of deciding that only Durban was in the running), Cape Town is bidding to host a number of major cultural, sport and business events. In many cases the international owners of the rights to host these events demand up-front payment or financial guarantees from host cities and we cannot be closed-minded about committing to them.

With so many of our core industries – hospitality, film, agriculture and others – having a significant seasonal element to them, it is imperative that we develop a more year round character to the Cape, as well as a greater focus on this as a business destination. This would help to make our businesses more viable and improve the unhappy state of our unemployment figures. By reducing the impact of seasonality, we will be better able to encourage more direct flights in and out of the city, and this can only be good for positioning Cape Town as a global African gateway and a perfect access point to the lucrative market of 1 billion consumers on this continent.
It’s time for us to take off as the Cape of Good Business. Let’s all get on board.

Guy Lundy is the CEO of Accelerate Cape Town, the Deputy Chairman of Wesgro and a board member of Cape Town Tourism. Ian Bartes is Manager: Service Standards and Quality Assurance at Cape Town International Airport and the Chairman of Cape Town Tourism. Rashid Toefy is the CEO of the Cape Town International Convention Centre and a board member of Cape Town Tourism.
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Old November 15th, 2010, 11:55 AM   #1498
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Passenger arrivals up 12% at CTIA. Probably compared to last year's October..? or up from September perhaps. News from the GM of CTIA
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Old November 16th, 2010, 11:15 PM   #1499
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Passenger arrivals up 12% at CTIA. Probably compared to last year's October..? or up from September perhaps. News from the GM of CTIA
16 Nov 2010: Increase In Arrivals To Cape Town

THE number of airline passengers arriving in Cape Town on domestic flights in October was 307 496, a record for any month and a clear indication that South Africans are travelling again.
The October figure was marginally higher that the best ever figure for December. It followed a good September when the number of arrivals was also a record for the month.
However, the number of passengers arriving on international flights was down to 49 224 the lowest October figure since 2006. At the height of the holiday season in December and January, international arrivals usually number between 75 000 and 80 000.
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Old November 17th, 2010, 12:43 PM   #1500
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Here's the figures for all the ACSA airports for October. An excellent month for Durban - particularly the large increase in international pax considering Emirates was flying here last Oct. JNB handled its largest number of international pax ever for a single month.



Totals for the last 12 months:



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