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Old January 21st, 2006, 05:28 PM   #81
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can't please everyone. I like tiers.
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 05:45 AM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scba
Seven levels at the Mets' place!?

I thought five at the Yankees was bad enough. I really don't like places with a ton of levels, like Milwaukee. The stadium just doesn't seem as big without huge masses of people in one area. Divided up, it looks corny to me, but I know they need their precious luxury boxes and reserved areas.
I would think they put at least two levels underground, the third at ground and the rest above ground. Porto's new ground has about three levels below ground, so the whole ground looks like it's sunk in.

Anyway, I was doing something during my extra time and I got this picture:



That C-shaped thing is Shea Stadium, where the Beatles used to play. I think they'll build on the car park to the right and blow that thing down. There's plenty of space to build it on, in any case.

Now look at Yankee Stadium:



I read that the new Yankee Stadium is going where the track is right now. Looks more constrained than the Shea area. The metro is right there, so I guess there's no need for a car park.
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Old February 1st, 2006, 10:41 PM   #83
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http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/...p-328430c.html
Yankees' pitchman

Business crowd rooting for his stadium plans

BY BILL EGBERT
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Yankees president Randy Levine pitched the team's new stadium plans to a different set of pinstripes yesterday, but the crowd was clearly on his team.

Pledging that seats would remain affordable and that the project would create jobs for Bronx residents, Levine basked in a lovefest from the borough's business community at the New Bronx Chamber of Commerce lunch as he outlined what he called "the largest private investment in the history of the Bronx."

Levine cited several design features of the new stadium that will make it superior to the House That Ruth Built.

Although the current Yankee Stadium has some 20,000 seats on the lower level and 30,000 upper-deck nosebleed seats, the New Yankee Stadium will reverse that ratio.

And in addition to recreating the historical facade of the old stadium, the new ballpark will boast a replica of the original frieze destroyed with other architectural details when the old stadium was renovated in the 1970s.

"The new stadium will actually look more like the original 1923 stadium than the current one does," Levine said.

He also assured Chamber members that the expanded number of luxury boxes will keep other seats at reasonable prices.

"This stadium is going to be affordable," said Levine, "affordable for everyone."

Levine's biggest applause line came as he touted the estimated 1,000 new permanent jobs the expanded facility will create.

"Hear me," he said, "jobs will go to Bronx residents."

Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion, who is negotiating a community benefit agreement with the ballclub, said he is pressing for a commitment of "at least 25%" of jobs, contracts and purchasing being set aside for Bronx residents - a figure Levine endorsed.

Levine also lent his support for Carrion's other ambitious plans for the stadium neighborhood, including a new high school focused of sports industry careers and a hotel and convention center.

While stressing that the Yankees organization "isn't in the business of developing hotels," Levine said the site plan would accommodate one.

"There's a parcel of land set aside for it," he said.

Levine also cited several changes in the plan that came out of talks with project opponents, like making the parking lots available year-round, and centralizing replacement parkland on the site of the old stadium.

"They really had some good ideas," Levine said."

Carrion drew laughter when he described the sometimes contentious process of hammering out a redevelopment plan.

"It's like making sausage," he said, shaking his head wearily.

"It's not pretty."

Originally published on January 31, 2006
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Old February 5th, 2006, 07:20 AM   #84
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This plan gets better and better the more I hear about it.
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Old March 28th, 2006, 10:23 AM   #85
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http://www.nysun.com/article/29915

Quote:
Council Subcommittee Today Hosts Hearing on Yankees' Stadium Proposal

By DAVID LOMBINO - Staff Reporter of the Sun
March 28, 2006

The Yankees' proposal to build a new stadium is the subject of a public hearing before a City Council subcommittee today, inaugurating a final round of sparring between opponents and supporters of the project in advance of a final council vote slated for April 5.

The new stadium and infrastructure improvements, estimated to cost about $1 billion, would be built near the existing ballpark, displacing about 22 acres of parkland. The parkland would be replaced at several nearby sites, but some members of local community and good government groups say the Yankees are not giving enough back to the surrounding community, one of the poorest in the city. The local community board rejected the plan last year.

Last week, details were released about a draft agreement between the Yankees and local politicians under which the Yankees would give about $28 million over the next 40 years to a panel that would distribute the money to local nonprofits. It would also include $100,000 a year for upkeep of neighboring parks, $100,000 for local sports groups, and 15,000 free tickets a year for Bronx schools, youth groups, and seniors.

Council Member Helen Diane Foster, a Democrat of the Bronx, said yesterday that the terms of that agreement articulated so far are a "joke" and are "insulting to the community."

Ms. Foster, the elected official who has been most critical of the project, said the majority of the Bronx delegation, while supportive of the project as a whole, has serious concerns and unanswered questions about the current proposal.

"We are not there. It definitely is not a done deal yet," Ms. Foster said, predicting changes to the plan or the community benefits agreement before next Wednesday's vote. "We are fans of the Yankees, but we are not fans of the Yankees organization."

A spokeswoman for the Yankees, Alice McGillion, said discussions about the agreement with the community are under way with the "political leadership" of the Bronx.

In land use matters, the City Council typically votes along with the local council member or the consensus of the delegation from the borough where the project is located.

Supporters, who include the mayor, the governor, the president of the Bronx, Adolfo Carrion, and the city's Department of Planning, say the new stadium would be the biggest private investment in Bronx history, would create jobs, and would help to spur an ongoing revitalization of the community.

Opponents vow to mount a legal challenge if the project is passed as proposed.

If the City Council gives final approval to the proposed 51,800-seat stadium, the city will spend $135 million to create new parks and enhance infrastructure, and the state will pay $70 million for additional parking facilities. The Yankees would pay about $800 million for the construction of the stadium, which would begin this season.
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Old March 28th, 2006, 02:56 PM   #86
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Public transportation around Yankee Stadium is quite pitiful though. There's a subway but no Metro North (sort of like the French RER) stop.
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Old March 28th, 2006, 10:19 PM   #87
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I think it would be cheper to rennovate the existing stadium rather than demolish and builld a new one.
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Old March 29th, 2006, 02:04 AM   #88
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I'm glad to see this happening, as much "history" as Yankee stadium has, it's an absolute craphole. Not only is the stadium ugly, but when you sit in the upper deck you can't see the field, and you feel like you're about to fall off the face of the earth........
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Old April 5th, 2006, 10:29 PM   #89
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http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/05/nyregion/05train.html
Support Grows for Rail Station at New Stadium in the Bronx

By PATRICK McGEEHAN
Published: April 5, 2006

For baseball fans who live in the northern suburbs, the biggest drawback to attending games at Yankee Stadium has long been the trip home.

To catch a train toward Westchester County or Connecticut, fans first have to ride the subway south into Manhattan because there is no commuter rail station near the stadium. Many of them choose to drive to the Bronx instead, clogging up the local streets with lines of honking cars late into the night.

But yesterday, after decades of pleading from fans in the suburbs and community activists in the Bronx, Gov. George E. Pataki and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg called on the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to devise a plan for a new Metro-North Railroad station adjacent to the proposed site of a new stadium.

The governor and the mayor weighed in on the eve of a City Council vote to approve the Yankees' plan to build the stadium and parking garages that would hold an additional 3,000 cars. Their support for the station could counteract critics who argued that the Yankees' plan would draw even more traffic to the South Bronx on game days, said Adolfo Carrión Jr., the Bronx borough president.

"It will certainly be used by fans," Mr. Carrión said. But, he added, "It will have a very definite positive impact on the area."

Mr. Carrión said the transportation agency estimated that construction of the station would cost $30 million to $40 million. But it is not clear where the money would come from.

There are no funds in the authority's current five-year plan earmarked for a new station in the Bronx. To make room for one, the authority, which operates New York City's subways and buses as well as Metro-North and the Long Island Rail Road, would have to shift money away from another capital project.

In its previous five-year plan, the authority allocated $5 million for the design of a Yankee Stadium station, but a complete design was never presented to the public. In August, Representative José E. Serrano, a Democrat from the Bronx, announced that he had secured $2.4 million in federal funds for the station.

Neither the governor, the mayor nor representatives of the authority or Metro-North would comment on the financing yesterday.

"We will undertake a review of the project outlined by the governor and mayor and present a proposal to the M.T.A. board in the coming weeks," said Tim O'Brien, a spokesman for the authority.

James F. Blair, a resident of Ossining, N.Y., who represents Metro-North riders on the authority's board, said the Metro-North Commuters Council had favored a station at Yankee Stadium for many years.

"We think there is a need for it and we hope that appropriate funding can be found," he said. But, he added, "we really need to see what the trade-offs are from a capital perspective in order to judge whether or not this is a sensible thing for the M.T.A. and other agencies to support."

Advocates of mass transit generally favor the idea of building the station, but some are wary about the details. "It's not the congestion-busting move that we would like to see, but it's a huge help," said Teresa Toro, New York City coordinator for the Tri-State Transportation Campaign. "The real one-two punch would be building the station and scaling back the new parking."

But the proposal already has suburban baseball fans dreaming of joyous train rides home after Yankee victories. "If they put in a new station, I'd probably look at season tickets again," said Kenneth Matinale of White Plains. He said he gave up his seats at Yankee Stadium after the 2000 season because "it's a pain in the neck to get down there from here."

Mr. Matinale, a member of a league of baseball zealots who call themselves the Westchester Baseball Discussion Group, said he had stopped parking in the stadium lots almost 30 years ago because it was more convenient to park on the streets of the South Bronx. But he said his car was burglarized during a World Series game in 1999 and tickets to the next game were stolen.

When Mr. Matinale attends Mets games at Shea Stadium, he said, he rides a Metro-North train to Grand Central, then switches to the No. 7 subway to Queens. He has even taken trains from White Plains to Philadelphia to see the Phillies play, but he said he would not consider the roundabout mass-transit trip to Yankee Stadium.

Even though Metro-North's Hudson Line tracks pass right by Yankee Stadium, suburban fans leaving a game must ride a subway to 125th Street in Harlem or to Grand Central Terminal in Midtown to connect to Metro-North. Fans have to travel to Grand Central or 125th Street, then take the subway up to the Bronx, to get to the stadium. But the trip home is more onerous, they say, because trains are less frequent at night.

"If you work in Midtown and somebody says, 'Hey, I've got tickets to tonight's Yankee game, want to go?' chances are you're going to say no unless that person is going to drive you home," Mr. Matinale said. "You wouldn't get home until 2 o'clock. Unless it's a Friday, that's going to be too late."

With a station at the stadium, Metro-North could provide service directly up and down the Hudson Line before and after games. Trains on its two other main branches, the Harlem and New Haven Lines, could get to and from the new station along a short connector less than a mile south of the stadium.
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Old April 6th, 2006, 10:14 PM   #90
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http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/06/ny...06stadium.html
Yankees Win as Council Approves Stadium

By WINNIE HU
Published: April 6, 2006


The new Yankee Stadium will seat fewer people than the current one, but offer 42 more luxury sky boxes.

The New York Yankees' effort to build a new stadium cleared its biggest hurdle yesterday with lopsided City Council votes supporting the team's ambitious plan to knock down the Bronx institution known around the world as the House that Ruth Built.

The new stadium will sit on parkland across the street from the current Yankee Stadium, which has served as the home of the team that won an unparalleled 26 World Series since it was built in 1923, the heyday of Babe Ruth. The new 53,000-seat stadium will offer 60 luxury sky boxes and 10,000 parking spaces when it is completed in 2009.

The Council overwhelmingly authorized construction of the $800 million stadium despite opposition from parks advocates and residents in the surrounding community, which is among the most impoverished areas in the city. These critics say the stadium would take away valuable parkland in a neighborhood that already has too little, snarl traffic on game days and lead to more pollution.

The Council's approval required the members to vote on 11 separate land-use items. Five items were passed 44 to 3, with 2 abstentions, while six passed 45 to 2, with 2 abstentions. The stadium plan gained support in the Council in recent weeks after the Yankees reached an agreement with Bronx officials to contribute $50 million over 20 years to underwrite programs for Bronx community groups. That will include $800,000 a year in grants for the groups, $100,000 a year in sports equipments, and 15,000 tickets a year to Yankee home games. Randy Levine, the president of the Yankees, said yesterday that the Council's approval showed that people all over the city, especially in the Bronx, believed in the project. "Hopefully when we get into the new building, we can win a few more World Series," he said.

The new stadium for the Yankees would represent the culmination of a long quest by the team, which had pushed for a new home in Manhattan but ultimately decided to remain in the Bronx as the borough's fortunes improved.

Under the financing plan for the stadium, the Yankees will pay for the construction through $930 million in bonds issued by the city, of which $860 million will be tax-exempt. Taxpayers will also bear some of the costs because the team will pay back the bonds through payments in lieu of taxes to the city.

In their current home, the Yankees pay rent to the city but only after deducting the cost of maintenance. The team pays no capital expenses. While the Yankees will not pay rent for the new stadium, the team will be responsible for the maintenance and operation costs and any capital improvements.

Under the deal, the city would spend at least $138 million to demolish the old stadium, create new parkland to replace the 22 acres being used for the stadium in Macomb's Dam and Mullaly Parks, and to make improvements to other nearby parks. The state's share would be $70 million of the $320 million cost of building four parking garages that could be used by local residents throughout the year; the remainder would come from private developers.

The Council must still approve the stadium financing plan at its next meeting on April 26. But Council members and others said yesterday that it was more of a formality at this point, given the strong support for the stadium among the 51 members of the Council, including Speaker Christine C. Quinn.

The stadium plan will also have to be reviewed by the National Park Service because the ballpark would be partly built in Macomb's Dam Park, where federal funds were used for park improvements in the late 1970's, said Geoffrey Croft, president of New York City Park Advocates, which is opposing the plan.

"This is historic parkland that the community was built around," Mr. Croft said. "It's devastating morally and ethically, and we wouldn't be having this conversation if it were in Central Park."

Mr. Levine said construction on the new Yankee stadium could begin as soon as this spring. When completed it will seat slightly fewer people than the current one, but will offer 42 more luxury sky boxes, which are lucrative for teams, and 3,000 more parking spaces. In another change, the new stadium will have standing room for another 1,000 people.

The stadium will incorporate significant design elements of the original Yankee Stadium, like the classic rooftop frieze that was destroyed during the 1974-75 renovation that will return this time, constructed of translucent elements.

Adolfo Carrión Jr., the Bronx borough president, said city officials were also seeking to preserve the dugouts, sections of the seats, and a giant bat that is displayed outside the stadium by moving them to the nearby parks, which will feature four baseball fields, among other things.

Besides giving the $50 million for programs for Bronx groups, the Yankees would reserve at least a quarter of the construction and stadium jobs for Bronx residents and businesses, and spend $1 million to create a job-training program. The team would pay another $450,000 for technical assistance and community outreach for each year during the stadium construction.

Still, many Bronx residents remained staunchly opposed to the Yankees' plan and several held up signs urging council members to vote against it. One woman passed out dollar bills picturing Councilwoman Maria del Carmen Arroyo, whose district includes the stadium, with the message: How much was the deal with the Yankees to hand over our public parks?

Ms. Arroyo, who voted for the stadium, said the integrity and reputation of elected officials in the Bronx had been inappropriately called into question by stadium opponents. "This has been a very difficult time not only for myself personally but for individuals who have sat on both sides of the issue," she said.

City officials plan today to unveil the latest design plans for a stadium proposed to be built in Queens for New York's other major league baseball team, the New York Mets. That would replace the Mets' current ballpark, Shea Stadium.
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Old July 12th, 2006, 03:57 AM   #91
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http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...TYM&refer=home

NYC Agency Approves Stadium Loans for Yankees, Mets (Update2)

July 11 (Bloomberg) -- New York City's Industrial Development Agency approved $1.58 billion of tax-exempt and taxable financing for baseball's Yankees and Mets to build new stadiums.

Agency officials said the deal was contingent upon the U.S. Internal Revenue Service allowing the issuance of tax-exempt bonds for most of the financing. Plans for the stadiums, which have wide political support, already have been approved by the City Council and the state's Empire State Development Corp. and Public Authorities Control Board.

The financing agreement would save the city about $113 million in the next 40 years by relieving it from maintenance and repair costs that would have exceeded rent payments at the two existing stadiums, agency officials said in a prepared statement. By the time the stadiums are completed in 2009, they will have created 16,000 construction jobs, the officials said.

"New stadiums for the Yankees and Mets will give a tremendous boost to the local economies of the South Bronx and Flushing, Queens,'' said the development agency's interim chairman, Joshua J. Sirefman.

The financing hinges upon the Internal Revenue Service granting the city a private letter permitting it to use its power to issue tax-exempt bonds for the stadiums. Several council members have said they remain unsure about whether the IRS will approve the transaction, although city attorneys assured officials in the mayor's office and council members that it will pass the review.

Job Creation

"In the event it isn't, each team may have to go back to the drawing board to come up with a new financing structure,'' Council Finance Committee Chairman David Weprin said when the body approved the arrangement in April.

Seth Pinsky, vice president of the city Economic Development Corp., which oversees the Industrial Development Agency, said the letter to the IRS was sent in April. The IRS hasn't indicated when they would respond, Pinsky said. "Our lawyers tell us they're optimistic,'' he said. "If it turns out that the tax letter runs against the agency, we'll have to reevaluate.''

The Yankees will get about $920 million in low-interest tax-exempt bonds and $25 million in taxable bonds to build its new stadium in the Bronx just north of the existing Yankee Stadium. The project will create about 9,700 construction jobs and 615 permanent jobs, excluding concessions, the agency said in a news release.

Bond Mix

For the new Mets stadium, IDA will issue about $528 million in tax-exempt bonds and $104 million in taxable bonds. The new Mets stadium, to be built in Flushing, Queens, just beyond the centerfield fence at Shea Stadium where the Mets now play, will create about 6,100 construction jobs and 970 permanent jobs, including concessions, the agency news release said.

Debt service on the tax-exempt bonds for both teams will be paid through payments in lieu of taxes, known as PILOTs, a financing structure the City Council approved. The taxable bonds for both teams will be repaid from rent. The development agency intends to also use exemptions from taxes on real estate, mortgage recording and sales to help lower the cost of construction for both teams, the news release said.

The Yankees' $1.169 billion project and the Mets' proposed $813 million stadium each cost more than the most expensive baseball stadium to date, eclipsing St. Louis's new $646 million Busch Stadium and "Ballpark Village.'' The Toronto Blue Jays' Rogers Centre, built in 1989, is second most expensive, costing $570 million, according to Major League Baseball.

Luxury Boxes

The Yankees' plan calls for demolishing the 56,937-seat current ballpark, built in 1923 and extensively renovated in the mid-1970s, and turning that site into several ball fields for community use. The new 53,000-seat ballpark, on which the team would hold a 38-year renewable lease, will include 60 luxury suites and new parking lots on 22 acres of what is now nearby parkland.

The city would contribute $164 million for infrastructure improvements such as new parks, sewer lines and road work. The state would provide $74.7 million, mostly for new parking, under agreements described by Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the City Council in April.

The 42,500-seat Mets stadium is designed to be built in brick, limestone, granite and cast stone to evoke Ebbets Field, the home of the old Brooklyn Dodgers. Shea, which opened in 1964, would be demolished.

The Queens stadium's $813 million cost would be financed through $632 million in bonds, including $528 million in exempt- issues carrying lower-than-market interest rates and $104 million in taxable bonds. The Mets would hold a 40-year renewable lease.

The city would pay $91.4 million for infrastructure improvements, and the state $74.7 million.

The mayor is founder and majority owner of Bloomberg News parent Bloomberg LP.


To contact the reporter on this story:
Henry Goldman in New York City Hall at
[email protected].


Last Updated: July 11, 2006 16:52 EDT
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Old July 13th, 2006, 08:47 PM   #92
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You would think for nearly a billion $ you could get a better looking ballpark then that. Camden Yards is still the best by the way.
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Old July 22nd, 2006, 09:19 AM   #93
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http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/22/ny...=1&oref=slogin

Approvals Clear Way for Yankees to Build

By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Published: July 22, 2006


The proposed $800 million ballpark for the New York Yankees received final regulatory approval this week, clearing the way for the club to start construction atop two parks across the street from the existing stadium.

Yankees officials said they hoped to begin building the 53,000-seat structure by the end of summer.

Construction will involve paving over large portions of Macombs Dam Park and Mullaly Park and cutting down about 400 mature oak trees. The stadium is scheduled to open in 2009.

“The Yankees are delighted with the wide-ranging support they’ve received,” said Howard J. Rubenstein, a spokesman for the Yankees.

The project, which was approved by the City Council this spring, engendered intense opposition among many of the stadium’s South Bronx neighbors and from parks advocates, who protested the loss of the two popular parks and feared increased traffic and pollution problems in an area with high childhood asthma rates.

While the stadium won the support of nearly all of the Bronx’s elected officials, the plan was rejected by the local community board, which had only advisory power. Several of the dissenting community board members were later replaced by the Bronx borough president, Adolfo Carrión Jr., who emerged as the new stadium’s most forceful advocate.

Opponents say they will probably file a lawsuit to halt construction, contending that portions of the 28-acre Macombs Dam Park and 18.5-acre Mullaly Park had been unlawfully taken from the public.

“Since Day 1, everything has been predicated on satisfying the desires of the Yankees without a care for the community or the city’s taxpayers,” said Geoffrey M. Croft, president of NYC Park Advocates.

During the past week, the Internal Revenue Service and the National Park Service gave their approval, respectively, to the stadium’s financing plan and to its construction on parkland. The park service approval was required because Macombs Dam Park received about $420,000 in federal improvement funds in the early 1980’s.

The park service concluded that the neighborhood’s loss of Macombs Dam Park would be offset by new parkland the project would provide, including three ball fields at the current Yankee Stadium, which will be partly torn down; a park on the Bronx River; and small parks placed atop stadium garages.

The I.R.S. approved the stadium’s complex financing plan, in which the ballpark will be paid for by the Yankees with $920 million in tax-exempt, low-interest city bonds and $25 million in taxable bonds. The Yankees will repay the 40-year bonds with an annual payment in lieu of taxes. The bonds are to be offered in the next few weeks, said Janel Patterson, a spokeswoman for the city’s Economic Development Corporation.

The Yankees will pay rent on the city-owned stadium, as well as payments in lieu of taxes, Ms. Patterson said. The city and state will pay for infrastructure improvements, including new parking garages and possibly a Metro-North commuter station in the area.

The final community benefits agreement between the Yankees and Bronx elected officials calls for the club to establish the Bronx Community Trust Fund, in which the team will place $32 million over 40 years — about $800,000 a year. The fund, which will be managed by an administrator who will be chosen by the team and by Bronx elected officials, will be distributed to local community and nonprofit groups.

The Yankees will also donate $100,000 in equipment and promotional merchandise to community and school groups and give away 15,000 tickets to home games. The average value of each ticket will be $25.

The community benefits agreement also calls for 25 percent of stadium construction work to go to Bronx businesses, with 50 percent of that total reserved for businesses owned by women or minorities.
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Old July 22nd, 2006, 11:26 PM   #94
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I am sure having a change of heart on the retro ballparks here. That entrance to the new Yankee stadium looks awesome.
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Old July 22nd, 2006, 11:51 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Game Is Up
I would think they put at least two levels underground, the third at ground and the rest above ground. Porto's new ground has about three levels below ground, so the whole ground looks like it's sunk in.

Anyway, I was doing something during my extra time and I got this picture:



That C-shaped thing is Shea Stadium, where the Beatles used to play. I think they'll build on the car park to the right and blow that thing down. There's plenty of space to build it on, in any case.

Now look at Yankee Stadium:



I read that the new Yankee Stadium is going where the track is right now. Looks more constrained than the Shea area. The metro is right there, so I guess there's no need for a car park.
OT: How do you get the text of places off the screen of Goggle Earth when you make a picture?
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Old July 24th, 2006, 05:40 AM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NFLeuropefan
I'm glad to see this happening, as much "history" as Yankee stadium has, it's an absolute craphole. Not only is the stadium ugly, but when you sit in the upper deck you can't see the field, and you feel like you're about to fall off the face of the earth........
I went about a month ago and absolute craphole is a little harsh. I was on vacation in NYC and wanted to see it even though I have heard scathing reviews. I sat in the upper deck and it wasnt that bad, it was no worse than the upper deck in many other stadiums Ive been to (Clemson's Memorial Stadium, Bank of America Stadium, etc). Compared to PNC, Camden, and parks like that its a little dated but its still a nice place to go see a ballgame. Even so, I like the new Stadium and would like to go see it after it is finished, this is a good move. Yankee Stadium in its current state isnt the Yankee stadium of old so its not like youre tearing down a shrine like Fenway or Wrigley. Youre right, it is good that it is being replaced because the old stadium is very dated, however its not like Yankee stadium is awful.
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Old August 18th, 2006, 12:58 PM   #97
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cool video
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Old August 18th, 2006, 03:36 PM   #98
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Why don't baseball stadiums complete the tiers all the way round, is it something to do with vision for the batter?
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Old August 18th, 2006, 04:59 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freeranger
Why don't baseball stadiums complete the tiers all the way round, is it something to do with vision for the batter?
Well, partly. The only area that needs to be darkened is deadaway center field.

Other than that, just capacity. With the seating the way it is now, completing the tiers all the way around would put capacities in the 60-70k range for most places, and teams usually only draw in the 30k-40k range for normal games. Plus, it would totally ruin the design. The outfields of baseball stadiums are grounds for customization. Unlike other sports, the team can put just about anything out there, or nothing at all.
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Old August 18th, 2006, 09:36 PM   #100
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I'll give you two reasons.

http://ballparks.com/baseball/american/oriole.htm

and

http://ballparks.com/baseball/national/pitbpk.htm

Enjoy!
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