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Old May 9th, 2013, 04:03 AM   #61
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Tiny robots in the eye may save patients' sight



Just like other parts of the body, the retina needs oxygen in order to survive. If it doesn’t receive enough – should its blood supply be restricted, for instance – permanent blindness can result. Therefore, the sooner that doctors know if a patient’s retina is receiving insufficient oxygen, the better the chances that they can take action in time. Soon, they may be able to use tiny injectable robots to get them the information they need.

Led by Prof. Bradley Nelson, researchers at ETH Zurich had already created microrobots for possible use in delivering medication or removing scar tissue within the eye. The devices measure a millimeter in length and one third of a millimeter in width, and can be guided through the vitreous fluid within the eye via externally-applied magnetic fields.

To turn the robots into oxygen sensors, the scientists coated them with nanospheres made of a dye created at Spain’s University of Granada. That dye fluoresces when exposed to a pulse of a specific wavelength of light – the faster that fluorescence subsequently fades, the higher the amount of oxygen in the dye’s immediate surroundings.

The dye-covered microrobots have already been successfully tested in water samples with varying oxygen levels. For their use in the eye, the idea is that they would first be injected into the vitreous fluid, and then steered toward the surface of the retina. A pulse of light would then be applied, with the duration of the robots’ resulting fluorescence being observed microscopically through the pupil.

When it came time to remove them, a needle could once again be inserted, and the robots would be magnetically attracted to it.

While there are already other methods of measuring oxygen levels within the eye, ETH claims that they aren’t sufficiently sensitive.

SOURCE: http://www.gizmag.com/microrobots-re...-levels/27435/
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Old May 15th, 2013, 11:16 PM   #62
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Carnegie Mellon Robot Uses Arms, Location and More To Discover Objects

A robot can struggle to discover objects in its surroundings when it relies on computer vision alone. But by taking advantage of all of the information available to it - an object's location, size, shape and even whether it can be lifted - a robot can continually discover and refine its understanding of objects, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute.

http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/arch...rbobjects.html


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Old May 21st, 2013, 12:20 PM   #63
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Military Robots To Patrol World Cup

Even non-soccer fans know how hooliganism can quickly turn a harmless match into a veritable war zone, full of riots, stabbings, even death. To help keep the peace at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, FIFA has decided to go high-tech by enlisting military robots for security.

http://news.discovery.com/tech/robot...cup-130516.htm


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Old June 3rd, 2013, 03:20 AM   #64
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REEM, the humanoid service robot created by PAL Robotics, can be used for several purposes. Thanks to its autonomous navigation system, its user-friendly touchscreen, and its voice and face recognition system, REEM can find its way in various surroundings and help or entertain people in most public environments.

Besides helping you as a guide or amusing you as an entertainer, REEM can also transport small packages, and its dynamic information point can be used with a wide variety of multimedia applications: display an interactive map of the surrounding area, call up a variety of information (weather, nearby restaurants, airlines travel time, etc...), offer tele-assistance via video-conferencing.

REEM can be used in a wide spectrum of public spaces as for example hotels, museums, trade shows, special events, shopping malls, airports, hospitals, care centers and many others.



http://pal-robotics.com/
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Old June 4th, 2013, 12:45 AM   #65
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Mind-controlled robot moves closer to reality



Thought-controlled robots are no longer the stuff of science fiction.

A group of French experts has teamed up with a Japanese robotics institute to develop technology which enables a person to remotely control a humanoid robot just by thinking about it.

The robot controller’s brain activity, which is linked with changes in blood flow, is detected by a brain scan. This has allowed researchers to develop a specific programme.

“It’s only a robot that you are operating at a distance. But the level of embodiment of the interface between the human and the robot should be in a way, such that you feel that this robot is part of you,” said Abderrahmane Kheddar, Director of the CNRS-AIST Japanese-French Joint Robotics Laboratory.

In one experiment, a camera mounted on the robot can see bottles of different sizes which flicker at a different frequency.

When the user focuses on a particular object, sensors detect the flickering frequency of the brain’s activity and the robot reaches out to grab the right bottle.

After a series of training sessions, the programme learns to associate a specific blood flow pattern with a specific body movement command.

To make the robot walk, flickering arrows appear on a screen and the sensors detect which arrow the user is concentrating on.

According to Damien Petit, a senior researcher at the lab, it is straight forward to use: “You just have to clear your mind and not to think about a lot of stuff, and just be focus on what you want to do. If you want to navigate the robot or take the object.”

A marriage between man and robot is the ultimate aim, a symbiosis which could have many every day practical uses.

SOURCE: http://euronews.com/2013/06/03/mind-...er-to-reality/
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Old June 4th, 2013, 09:24 AM   #66
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Boeing using robots to boost 777 output

Boeing shows off some improvements to its 777 assembly line

[...]

Manually, it takes a team of painters 4.5 hours to do the first coat. The robots do it in 24 minutes with perfect quality. Boeing began using the machine in February. By midsummer, all 777 wings will be painted this way.

http://seattletimes.com/html/busines...ing777xml.html


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Old June 7th, 2013, 02:19 PM   #67
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The RK-1 Is An Arduino-Based Mobile Robot You Control With Smartphone Swipes



London-based roboticist Evangelos Georgiou wants to offer an open-source platform for helping Arduino hobbyists take their projects mobile, thanks to a remote controlled robot called the RK-1 that combines a programmable Arduino microcontroller with apps for iPhone or Android, tank tracks, DC motors and Wi-Fi connectivity. It’s a project that could really help out with home hobbyists, or with education workshops and classes to get people young and old more interested in robotics.

The apps for the RK-1 will be free to download from the App Store and Google Play, according to Georgiou, and they use swipe touch gestures to manage changes in direction and forward/backward movement. It’s simple, and intuitive, but does look like it could be a very cool way for people to add an extra dimension to their product. And since Georgiou is following the example of other open source hardware hobbyist gadget sellers like Adafruit, there’s ample opportunity for cross-pollination with other similar projects, with built-in support in the ultimate companion app for sensors and breakout boards favored by the Arduino community.



Georgiou is a PhD student at King’s College London, and is also working full-time as a software developer at the school. His area of expertise is the impressive sounding “autonomous non-holonomic mobile robots implementing computer vision and advanced machine learning methods,” which basically translates to him really knowing what he’s talking about when it comes to building bots. His co-founder in the project Reetu Kansal is an experience assurance manager, and has been helping with project design and operation management as the RK-1 has developed.

Georgiou is seeking just £5,000 (7,800 U.S.), but already has stretch goals in place for £15,000 on up to £50,000, in a fit of optimism. Pre-orders of RK-1 kits start at £150 ($234 U.S.). It’s an ambitious product, but its founder has both the software and hardware know-how to make it happen, and this could be a very welcome component for robotics home hobbyists and educators.

SOURCE: http://techcrunch.com/2013/06/06/the...tphone-swipes/
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Old June 15th, 2013, 03:45 AM   #68
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Flying robots get off the ground



Attaching a platform to a high-rise building to evacuate people in an emergency, or creating a landing stage for an aircraft on uneven terrain - these are just two areas in which flying robots could have a huge impact - potentially saving lives.



The ARCAS ('Aerial Robotics Cooperative Assembly System') team is 18 months into a 4-year project to develop such machines. The team is working on the first-ever cooperative free-flying robot system able to assemble and construct structures in inaccessible sites, including in space. The project is funded under the Information and Communication Technologies strand of the EU's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), having received EUR 6.15 million from the European Commission.

Advances in five key areas are needed to get the robots up and flying: the helicopters or quadrotor systems themselves, motion control for transportation and assembly; robot perception; cooperation between multiple robots; and tools to allow human intervention.

The team has already developed prototypes. The first is a quadcopter with a robotic arm and a 'hand' designed to grasp cylindrical objects. Keeping the arm's weight as low as possible was a priority; the result is minimal impact on the quadcopter's stability.

The second prototype is an electrical helicopter fitted with a gripper mounted on an arm able to bend in any direction.

Each robot will be equipped with a manipulator able to grasp objects. The team is working on motion control techniques for this manipulator, which must include coordinating the control of multiple flying robots grasping the same object during a construction task.

Perception is key to any task-oriented robot. For the ARCAS robots, this includes scene recognition, fast 3D model generation, simultaneous localisation and mapping by multiple aerial robots, accurate 3D positioning and tracking so that assembly operations can be guided, and cooperative perception for assembly - the robots must be able to work together.

Cooperative planning will ensure safety during the simultaneous operation of multiple flying robots during assembly, disassembly or inspection tasks, while human operators must be able to intervene in this autonomous perception, planning and control when necessary. They will do this using virtual reality haptics - technology operated through touch.

Once the concepts, methodologies and algorithms are in place, they will be tested in three different ways. Autonomous quadrotors and an integrated system for positioning will assessed for basic manipulation and assembly functions. These tests will take place indoors. More advanced manipulation devices with integrated force sensors mounted on autonomous helicopters will be tested outdoors. And multiple robot arms will be used to simulate free-flying objects manipulating objects in space.

The project is expected to lay the foundations for designing and developing cooperating flying robots with various physical characteristics that could be used in a range of applications. ARCAS' industrial partners will be the first to adopt the project's technologies, providing a path to commercialisation, whether in inspection, maintenance, repair, satellite servicing or structure construction.

SOURCE: http://cordis.europa.eu/fetch?CALLER...ION=&RCN=35804
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Old June 19th, 2013, 01:11 AM   #69
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Watch A Robotic Cheetah-Cub Run



A mechanical cheetah cub joins the Noah’s Ark that has captivated robotics in recent years. Today Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne (EPFL)'s Biorobotics Laboratory (Biorob) published a study detailing experiments on the cheetah-cub quadruped robot. The size of a small house cat (or cheetah cub, which sounds more menacing), this bot has limbs designed to mimic the stealthy moves of a feline.



The goal for the cheetah-cub was to create an easy-to control platform, with a focus on locomotion--the rhythm and mechanics of how it moves. The legs were designed to be fast and stable, which work well for tough terrain and research missions. Modeled after mammalian animals' three-segment legs, the cheetah-cub has springs embedded within its agile legs. The springs act as tendons, and small motors called actuators are the robot's muscles, converting energy into movement.



Developing gaits for legged-robots can be difficult, so to control locomotion in the cheetah-cub, researchers used central pattern generators, or CPGs. These are inspired by biology, as they are found in many animals' spinal cords, where they create rhythmic patterns of neural activity. Researchers can encode these CPGs to implement specific parameters, such as hip angle. Another important parameter for developing the gait is the amount of time the leg has contact with the ground.

For this study, researchers focused on the trot gait. The cheetah-cub, which weighs about 2.2 pounds can move at a speed that's equal to almost seven body lengths per second (or 3.2 mph). This makes it the fastest quadruped under about 66 lbs.



But it isn't all about copying nature. Researcher on the study, Alexander Spröwitz, studies biomechanics and sees the cheetah-cub as an important part of understanding and exploring how animals move--for example, how certain patterns are generated, or what type of torque is present in an animal's joints.

"Biologists cannot directly observe [biomechanics in animals] because you cannot cut into the leg of a living animal without harming it," Spröwitz says. "It's possible to recreate it with a robot, and then you can actually change the conditions--the length of the leg or segmentation--you basically can test different scenarios, which you cannot do on an animal."

In the future, researchers hope that this swift, self-stabilizing platform will prove useful for creating a team of rescue bots that can effectively work in rough, diverse terrain after catastrophes, where rescue bots with wheels or treads struggle or get stuck.



SOURCE: http://www.popsci.com/science/articl...robot-runs-cat
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Old June 21st, 2013, 11:53 PM   #70
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 01:12 AM   #71
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 08:44 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulpia-Serdica View Post
ALDEBARAN Robotics announces the launch of the new V4 generation of its NAO robot, equipped with an Intel Atom microprocessor. The first NAO sold over 2000 units worldwide. The NAO robots were mainly acquired by universities for further robotics developments, including Tokyo U which have acquired several of these little robots for studying and further developing since NAO has re-programmable OS.

In parallel with hardware improvements, NAO V4 features a new voice recognition algorithm, developed by Nuance; faster and more reliable, it also incorporates word-spotting capacities, allowing NAO isolate and recognize a defined word in a sentence or in a conversation.

Aldebaran is not an american and not a japanese society.

our researchers are intelligent but at the same time they have obsessions, very primary projects.
Why to create robots which get closer as much as possible to a human being, why to create artificial human beings?

very primary
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 10:06 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulpia-Serdica View Post
ALDEBARAN Robotics announces the launch of the new V4 generation of its NAO robot, equipped with an Intel Atom microprocessor. The first NAO sold over 2000 units worldwide. The NAO robots were mainly acquired by universities for further robotics developments, including Tokyo U which have acquired several of these little robots for studying and further developing since NAO has re-programmable OS.

In parallel with hardware improvements, NAO V4 features a new voice recognition algorithm, developed by Nuance; faster and more reliable, it also incorporates word-spotting capacities, allowing NAO isolate and recognize a defined word in a sentence or in a conversation.

nNbj2G3GmAo
Nice, but it's hardly "news"... this story is from December 2011.
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 11:41 PM   #74
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Aldebaran is not an american and not a japanese society.
I know. Nowhere in my post does it state that they are an American or Japanese company

Quote:
Originally Posted by wjfox
Nice, but it's hardly "news"... this story is from December 2011.
I didn't know that this thread is solely for news. I thought we could share info about robotics in general. I'm sure that not everyone knew about this robot even though the video is from 2011.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 02:49 PM   #75
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Old June 24th, 2013, 06:59 PM   #76
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Rolling robot offers help to farmers

The trick used by hamsters to get an exercise ball rolling are helping to power a spherical robot.

Spanish researchers have found a way to mimic the shifting movement of a hamster inside a ball to get their Rosphere robot moving.

The electronics controlling the robot replace the hamster and act as a swinging weight to propel it forward.

Field trials have shown the Rosphere could help monitor soil conditions on arable land.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23030082


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Old June 27th, 2013, 01:07 AM   #77
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German Robotic Ape Shows Off Sophisticated Engineering Design



The German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) is following a growing line of robots influenced by nature and have developed a walking and balancing robotic gorilla. Rather than build a bot with a purpose in mind (like the robotic pack mule being developed in the States by DARPA), the DFKI’s “iStruct” ape seems to be built as a mere demonstration of sophisticated new engineering components.



The iStruct’s feet, for example, are built with sensors to keep it moving in sync and in a more natural way than other robotic animals. The new robot ape also boasts an actuated spine that is capable of movement, a departure from the solid steel backbones found in most other animal-like robots.



In an official statement, DFKI explained the goal behind the iStruct, saying the parts they’ve developed here can be used on other platforms to “improve the locomotion and mobility characteristics” of future bots.



“The intelligent structures to be developed contain a variety of functions which cannot only extend the already existing locomotion behaviors of robots, but also permit further relevant applications like the contemporaneous use as carrier and sensor system. This way, different functionalities are united in one construction unit.”



In a video, the iStruct is seen casually loping around in slow strides, moving forward at first before engaging a point turn. According to Discovery News, these seemingly simple actions are anything but easy from an engineering perspective. DFKI has packed the iStruct with 43 force and torque sensors, some of which reside in the heel of the machine. The robotic ape walks with a heel-toe step that is more akin to a human’s gait. As the robot walks, sensors in the heel are constantly measuring the distance to the ground to keep it balanced and upright.



An array of accelerometers also work in concert to keep iStruct together and moving in one direction while temperature sensors make sure the robot’s components don’t overheat and fail. The iStruct is also autonomous and is capable of moving on its own free of wires or tethers. A self-contained battery is packed on board and weighs about 40 pounds.



In a second video on the website, the iStruct is seen perched on all fours on a table. A researcher begins tilting the table like a seesaw to try to shake the iStruct from its position. The aforementioned sensors and accelerometers worked to let the bot move along with the table rather than fall off. This balancing capability, as well as its ability to walk smoothly and naturally, will allow the DFKI’s new primate robot to climb hills and tackle terrain other robots might shy away from.



DFKI says they received their funding from the Space Agency of the German Aerospace Center and the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi). Although they didn’t build iStruct with a specific task in mind, it seems likely that parts of this technology could one day wind up moving robots along in outer space.



And this isn’t the first robotic primate we’ve seen, of course. A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC) developed the CHIMP (short for CMU Highly Intelligent Mobile Platform) earlier this year to compete in DARPA’s Robotics Challenge.



Unlike iStruct, the CHIMP gets around via tank-like treads on its feet and forearms. It’s also built with claws for hands and was built to aid in disaster relief.

SOURCE: http://www.redorbit.com/news/technol...ermans-062613/
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Old June 27th, 2013, 05:39 AM   #78
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This just so reminds of Terminator...the early attempts at AI and more natural robots, small advances and breakthroughs...then the BIG breakthrough...and suddenly...the MACHINES will rise
Still, I say bring it on. First job - set them loose in the CAVES of MARS!
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Old June 27th, 2013, 09:47 PM   #79
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Actually, using robots for an advanced and high risk operations on other planets are perfect use for such machines, that's what space rovers are made for, and perhapse little army of such machines would make colonisation and preparing of colonisation much easier.

Still, extensive use of robots in both civil life and in warfare, will cause more advanced work on EMP weapons of massive range and effect. Wonder what would happend, if such an EMP blast would fry all electrics in one of central places of our world, New York, London, Shanghai or others. Hopefully, development of robots woudn't result in growind dependency of human life on electrinics devices, at least not to the point, when civilisation will tremble and fall after 72hours long blackout on a larger scale.
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Old July 3rd, 2013, 01:00 AM   #80
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Introducing TORO, Germany's new humanoid robot



Engineers at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) have proven once again that they know how to make a snazzy looking robot. Quietly announced to little fanfare, DLR's Robotics and Mechatronics Center recently put the finishing touches on its DLR-Biped, a pair of shiny blue legs that first stepped onto the scene in 2009. Those legs have now been upgraded to the status of a full-fledged humanoid robot, sporting an all-new upper body and a new name: the Torque Controlled Humanoid Robot, or TORO for short.



"Now that the robotic body is complete, we can test processes where the robot carries out sequences of movements with foresight and fluency," explains Project Manager Christian Ott. "If a person opens a heavy door, for example, they do so in a dynamic process; they know subconsciously which moves must be performed. Our robot should be able to do this as well. Another goal is to climb stairs. This involves TORO learning how to pull itself up on a handrail like a human."



DLR's Robotics and Mechatronics Center's other major humanoid robot, Rollin' Justin, first appeared in 2008. As you may have gathered from its name, that robot moves on wheels rather than legs. Its capabilities have been gradually improved over the years, leading some to think that Justin's upper body module would be merged with DLR-Biped's legs. Instead, the team built an upper body specifically for TORO with a new head, torso, light weight arms, and simplified hands.

The researchers at DLR want to push TORO beyond what Justin and other humanoid robots like ASIMO already do, including the ability to react autonomously and intelligently in a range of different circumstances.

The DLR-Biped wasn't the DLR's first foray into walking robots, nor is it Germany's only example (the Technical University of Munich has developed two full-sized examples in Johnnie and LOLA). However, it is among an elite group of new humanoids that, like Italy's COMAN, have torque-controlled joints. These give its limbs some elasticity where prior examples were rigid and unyielding, improving safety when interacting with people and increasing robustness to unforeseen external forces.

Compared to bipeds built in Japan and Korea, the DLR-Biped was already remarkable for its very small feet. "On the one hand, we wanted to make it more difficult by using a small footprint, but on the other, it enables the robot to climb over obstacles more easily," explains Ott. Now, the team will have to tweak the robot's walking gait to incorporate its upper body weight and arm movements. Plus, the addition of arms and hands opens a world of possibilities for the team to explore.

SOURCE: http://www.gizmag.com/dlr-humanoid-robot-toro/28118/
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