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Old December 20th, 2005, 11:55 PM   #1
polako
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Does Europe have any fast growing cities?

We all know that the US, Japan, Canada and Australia have many fast growing cities(over 20% a decade). I have searched online for fast growing cities in Europe, but haven't found any. So my question to Europeans on this board is, are there any fast growing cities in Europe? Since the European population is set to decline sharply in the coming decades are there any growing cities at all or are most of the cities there just stagnant/declining in population? Or maybe there are some areas of Europe where cities are still growing fast?
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Old December 21st, 2005, 12:06 AM   #2
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Toulouse is the fastest of France (passed over 1.1 million inhabitants, was 900 000 in 1999 and 700 000 in 1982), I think also cities like Madrid grow quite quickly with high immigration.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 12:08 AM   #3
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Five fastest growing urban areas of the European Union
Rank Urban Area Annual change
(1990s)
1 Toulouse, France 1.47%
2 Helsinki, Finland 1.46%
3 Braga, Portugal 1.27%
4 Stockholm, Sweden 1.08%
5 Dublin, Republic of Ireland 0.89%


but this is urban area only , didnt find figures for metro area.


heres some info about toulouse

The population of the city proper (French: commune) was 390,350 (as of the 1999 census), with 964,797 inhabitants in the metropolitan area (French: aire urbaine) (as of 1999 census). As of February 2004 estimates, the population of the city proper reached 426,700 inhabitants, which means a record 1.8% population growth per year between 1999 and 2004 for the city proper.

Toulouse is the fourth largest city in France, after Paris, Marseille and Lyon. In 1999 Toulouse was the fifth largest metropolitan area in France, after Paris, Lyon, Marseille and Lille.

Fueled by booming aerospace and high-tech industries, population growth of 1.5% a year in the metropolitan area in the 1990s (compared with a sluggish 0.37% for metropolitan France), and a record 2.2% yearly growth in the 2000s (0.58% for metropolitan France), means Toulouse metropolitan area hit the 1,000,000 inhabitants mark in 2002 or 2003. Boasting the highest population growth of any French metropolitan area larger than 500,000 inhabitants, Toulouse is well on its way to overtake Lille as the fourth largest metropolitan area of France.

With 2.2% yearly population growth in the metropolitan area, Toulouse is also by far the fastest growing metropolitan area larger than one million inhabitants in Europe. Smaller metropolitan areas, such as Montpellier, France, may have higher growth rates than Toulouse, but their growth involves a much smaller number of inhabitants than in Toulouse. Even for North American standards, the population growth of Toulouse is quite remarkable. According to the US Census 2000, in the 1990s there were only 14 US metropolitan areas with a population over one million inhabitants that had a population growth superior to 2.2% per year. With 2.2% per year, Toulouse is growing almost twice as fast as, for instance, the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1990s (1.2% per year), and approximately at the same pace as Nashville or Salt Lake City did in the 1990s, these last two also being two US metropolitan areas with about the same number of inhabitants as the Toulouse metropolitan area.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 12:26 AM   #4
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Plenty. Milton Keynes and Swindon in London's outer Metro are good examples

Swindon:

1901=45,006
1911=50,751
1921=57,486
1931=66,779
1951=76,714
1961=102,930
1971=117,312
1981=129,461
1991=147,979
2001=157,000
2011=208,000 (estimate)

Link

Milton Keynes has grown from 40,000 at its 1967 foundation to 219,240 in 2005:

(1971) 46,500
(1981) 98,500
(1991) 144,700
(2001) 177,500
(2005) 219,240

MK is planned to surpass 300,00 by 2030
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Old December 21st, 2005, 01:49 AM   #5
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Some interesting figures.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 02:21 AM   #6
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A fast growing town (for german standards) is Lüneburg near Hamburg.

From 1994 till 1997 the county of Lüneburg (which is basically the town of Lüneburg and the surrounding municipalities) grew by 6% in population. In 1998 the town of Lüneburg had a population of ca. 66.000 and in 2004 a population of ca. 71.000. in 2005 it were a bit over 70.000, but if the university continues to expand, I expect a further grow. The University of Lüneburg, which is mainly located on a former military base, currently has already 11.000 students.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 03:35 AM   #7
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Almere, NL: 0 around 1978, about 180k now but that's a newtown in a new polder. Utrecht booms, to gain about 100k over a decade, now around 270k.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 03:40 AM   #8
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London, Madrid, Barcelona, Moscow, and Istanbul are all booming with fast growing populations and economies and masses of impressive construction projects.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 03:47 AM   #9
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The fastest growing city in US(over 100K) in the last 14 years has been Gilbert town(a suburb) in the southern Phoenix Metro. But in the next few years there are many towns that will surpass 100K all over US that are growing super-fast(faster than Gilbert). Northern suburbs of Dallas are growing crazy right now. Many towns are about to pass 100K and are growing at over 5% yearly rate. Now that is impressive.

1990c:29,000
2000c:110,000
2004e:157,000

1990-2000:279%
2000-2004:43%

Last edited by polako; December 21st, 2005 at 05:22 AM.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 05:30 AM   #10
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How about metro's over 1 million, i don't care about some small town growing fast.
So which large european metro's are growing as quickly as cities in the new world.

an example, Toronto

4,883,800 in 2001
5,304,100 in 2005
420,300 net increase in 4 years -105K a year
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Old December 21st, 2005, 06:38 AM   #11
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There are a couple of reasons cities grow, internal migration , which moves people from one side of the country to another (more like a lifestyle choice as can be seen quite often in the US move to the sunbelt). And traditional migration which is allowing new nationalities to move in.

In general with a very low or negative birth rate for most European countries it's very hard to grow a city unless they allow migration from outside. This is helped somewhat by Classifying the whole EU as one place with ease of movement from one side to the other but overall the increase in population even if you include the new countries is quite small , specially compared with outside Europe. Hence you will not see so many European cities grow so fast . Literally this is the old world unless some drastic changes take place.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 08:29 AM   #12
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One thing to keep in mind is that most other parts of the world think in terms of metropolitan area's, whilst this is still a new concept in Europe. Statistics for European cities are usually based on city proper political boundary's, and as we know, much growth in cities, in Europe as in elsewhere in the world, is based in the suburbs or MA surrounding a city.

This is often why many European cities seem to be stagnant in size or even loosing population. The drift is in many cases simply to the suburbs or MA, and in fact, the whole MA usually has experienced growth.

One classic example is how it is often pointed out that London's population is smaller than it was after WWII. Publications that point this out rarely mention that the reason was that a great deal of people shifted to the surrounding suburbs and MA. At the same time, that MA has experienced enormous growth.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 08:35 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bustero
There are a couple of reasons cities grow, internal migration , which moves people from one side of the country to another (more like a lifestyle choice as can be seen quite often in the US move to the sunbelt). And traditional migration which is allowing new nationalities to move in.

In general with a very low or negative birth rate for most European countries it's very hard to grow a city unless they allow migration from outside. This is helped somewhat by Classifying the whole EU as one place with ease of movement from one side to the other but overall the increase in population even if you include the new countries is quite small , specially compared with outside Europe. Hence you will not see so many European cities grow so fast . Literally this is the old world unless some drastic changes take place.

I don't agree with this, as the cities have grown enormously within the MA (see my post above). It's the city proper's that have not experienced much growth, but this is quite normal in other cities around the world (including Australia or the U.S.)

Internal migration can enormously enlarge a city, particualy an MA. Just look at Australia. This country has a very small population, but several reasonably sized cities. Much of the growth of these cities has been internal migration as well as external, with large numbers of the rural population moving into the various MA's.

Few of the city proper's have grown at all, with the exception of Brisbane (because it is so large it encompases a good deal of the MA) and Sydney (Because it annexed another city a few years ago).

But even then, after 200 years, Sydney still only has 146,000 people. Although it's MA has jumped to 4.2million. Perth, still only has around 8,000 people, though it's MA has grown to 1.4million.

If you look at European MA's, you will also see the large increases in population. The problem is, that Metropolitan Area's is a new concept in Europe, so records don't go back very far.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 12:47 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by You are to blame
How about metro's over 1 million, i don't care about some small town growing fast.
So which large european metro's are growing as quickly as cities in the new world.

an example, Toronto

4,883,800 in 2001
5,304,100 in 2005
420,300 net increase in 4 years -105K a year
Obviously there are problems in such comparisons as London having a metro of 18mn is a relatively recent idea and there is no definate idea as to its exact geographical coverage and thus hard to find any previous figures. But for city proper you get te following:

Toronto
2001: 2,481,494
2004: 2,518,772
4 Years: 37,278
/Year: 9,319

London
2001: 7,172,091
2005: 7,500,000
5 Years: 327,909
/Year: 65,581
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Old December 21st, 2005, 12:54 PM   #15
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Barcelona is not a booming city. No space enough to grow anymore.

Madrid in fact is growing very much. Building new residential areas in the north and south.

here some pics.

The north:
(Sanchinarro)


(Las Tablas)


(Madrid Arena - Towers)


The south:

The purple area will be constructed. Resedential area (and industrial)
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Old December 21st, 2005, 01:01 PM   #16
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^ Barcelona city may not be growing, but the metropolitan area, which matters more in most instances, is growing rather healthily. With improved transport, I would not be surprised if the number of people comgin from other provinces to Barcelona would increase too.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 01:33 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by picassoborseli
Barcelona is not a booming city. No space enough to grow anymore.

Madrid in fact is growing very much. Building new residential areas in the north and south.

here some pics.

The north:
(Sanchinarro)


(Las Tablas)


(Madrid Arena - Towers)


The south:

The purple area will be constructed. Resedential area (and industrial)
WOW. Those pics are amazing.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 01:34 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQui
^ Barcelona city may not be growing, but the metropolitan area, which matters more in most instances, is growing rather healthily. With improved transport, I would not be surprised if the number of people comgin from other provinces to Barcelona would increase too.

This is very true. Most of the growth are at the outer edges of the metropolitan area, especially the two demographic regions known as the RMB (Metropolitan Region of Barcelona which covers 3,236km˛) and the CPSV (Functional Metropolitan Area of Barcelona, which covers 4,592km˛)

This link, shows the 2001 population of the RMB at 4,390,390 people:
http://www.isprs.org/istanbul2004/comm1/papers/53.pdf

And this link show's the 2004 figure at 4,673,648 people
http://www.bcn.es/estadistica/angles...s/sintesi1.pdf

An increase of 283,285 or an increase of 94,419 people per year, only slightly smaller than Toronto, and if you consider the area covered by the CPSV, you would have something similar to Toronto's growth.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 01:51 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by You are to blame
How about metro's over 1 million, i don't care about some small town growing fast.
So which large european metro's are growing as quickly as cities in the new world.

an example, Toronto

4,883,800 in 2001
5,304,100 in 2005
420,300 net increase in 4 years -105K a year
You want to see fast growth of a large metro, check this out.

Las Vegas Metro

1990c:853,000
2000c:1,563,000
2005e:1,965,000

1990-2000
yearly growth-71,000
yearly % inc.-8.3

2000-2005
yearly growth-80,000
yearly % inc.-5.1

Metro Las Vegas is booming, because of job availabilities and very supreme economic conditions. In November the 2 million Metro recorded an unemployment of 30,000 and unemployment rate of around 3%. That is just simply amazing. And some sectors of the economy are reporting worker shortages. Las Vegas keeps on booming. And it is the fastest growing US Metro over 500K.

Last edited by polako; December 21st, 2005 at 04:07 PM.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 02:03 PM   #20
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wow Toronto & Las Vegas are growing fast.
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