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Old March 13th, 2019, 09:59 AM   #16501
KJBrissy
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When I said someone, I include the collective someone. The Greens are some of the worst at this. Demand planning, yet are the first to ignore it if they don't like it.
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Old March 13th, 2019, 12:10 PM   #16502
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Locke View Post
Sunland are preparing a new DA for the site.

The idea of the council acquiring prime riverfront land from a developer is just a great way for the council to get ripped off. The site is not cheap - worth $30 million, Sunland have no obligation to sell it at that price.

Then add the cost of a bridge - $40-60 million.

All for yet another cycle bridge and park? Are there not more pressing ways to blow $100 million dollars?
$100 mill would build a lot of foot paths. In my area (about 100 years old this year) we still do not have any footpaths. My now deceased neighbour who was partially blind had to walk on the roads as the verges are full of tree roots and other trip hazards. Of course she was clipped by a car and broke a wrist.

I love seeing great active participation infrastructure but how about getting the basics right first? Would hate to add up how much the residents of my area have kicked into council coffers for 100 years with sweet f*** all to show for it!
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Old March 14th, 2019, 01:32 AM   #16503
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KJBrissy View Post
I hate the reactionary acquiring of land for parkland just because someone didn't like the proposal. It happened at Tennyson and St. Lucia. It's an absolute money sink of an approach and there are far better ways to go about things.
and milton tennis courts....... and to a lesser extent, seventeen mile rocks and kangaroo point.

i wouldnt be surprised if it happened to be honest, nor would i be surprised if sunland were privately supportive of it and had suggested this to some of the political parties.
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Old March 14th, 2019, 02:12 AM   #16504
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That's right it was Milton, not St. Lucia.

The site in St. Lucia was where people were asking for a park instead of development.
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Old March 14th, 2019, 03:29 AM   #16505
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There are much higher priority green-bridges than West-End to Toowong. i.e KP-CBD or Bulimba to Newstead. Both these would allow 1000's of people to get to the city much quicker.
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Old March 14th, 2019, 08:36 AM   #16506
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Industrial Warehouses and land slowly disappearing making room for residential apartments in Inner Brisbane

Brisbanetimes---------------------------------->https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/nat...13-p513zd.html

Newstead, West End apartments putting the squeeze on industrial land
Lucy Stone
By Lucy Stone
March 14, 2019 — 12.26pm

Brisbane's limited industrial land is under pressure from multiple sectors, and needs to be protected to sustain industry jobs, a Brisbane City Council report says.

Industry accounts for 15 per cent of the city's jobs but industrial-zoned land supporting major businesses is often re-zoned for residential use, particularly along the Brisbane River.

Brisbane's industrial sector needs better support to continue its growth, according to a new council report.
Brisbane's industrial sector needs better support to continue its growth, according to a new council report.CREDIT:TAMMY LAW

As the city's formerly industrial centre becomes increasingly residential, Brisbane's major industry areas - both inner-city and further afield - need to change, the council's Brisbane Industrial Strategy 2019 says.

"Although these precincts are generally well supported by infrastructure, there are opportunities available to promote and consolidate them," the report notes.

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"For example, this could include facilitating the efficient use of infrastructure, increasing services and amenity in industrial areas to help attract a talented workforce and realising the benefits of co-location."

The report lays out six priorities and nine key actions to support and sustain Brisbane's industry.

The report recommended land zoned for industry be protected but also calls for better management of industrial uses on such land to protect more "sensitive" neighbours.

It recommended "flexibility" for regulation to ensure future innovation be supported and the improvement of public transport and infrastructure to major industrial zones.

City planning needed to be used to develop industrial precincts around the city, the report finds.

City planning committee chairman councillor Matthew Bourke said 77 public submissions had been received during consultation on the plan.

“The industrial sector currently provides 15 per cent of all jobs in Brisbane and contributes significantly to local production and exports, with demand for industrial land potentially outstripping supply by 2041,” Cr Bourke said.

“The nine key actions focus on addressing key priorities for industry through an approach involving changes to Brisbane City Plan 2014, and non-statutory initiatives with a future‑focused, strategic approach to encouraging industrial development over time.”

Property Council Queensland executive director Chris Mountford said Brisbane's industrial property market had been a "shining light" in recent years.

“This new strategy seeks to maintain this growth by removing a number of the obstacles
to further investment that are currently being experienced by the sector," he said.

Mr Mountford welcomed the report's emphasis on flexible regulation for the sector.

“Today you are more likely to find millions of dollars’ worth of robotics and workers in lab
coats rather than smoke stacks and overalls," he said.

“That is why it is so important that our planning system moves with the times and ensures there is flexibility to attract the industrial uses of the future, rather than locking up land in a dogmatic way.”
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Old March 14th, 2019, 08:37 AM   #16507
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Industrial warehouses and land slowly disappearing making room for residential apartments in inner Brisbane

Brisbanetimes---------------------------------->https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/nat...13-p513zd.html

Quote:
Newstead, West End apartments putting the squeeze on industrial land
Lucy Stone
By Lucy Stone
March 14, 2019 — 12.26pm

Brisbane's limited industrial land is under pressure from multiple sectors, and needs to be protected to sustain industry jobs, a Brisbane City Council report says.

Industry accounts for 15 per cent of the city's jobs but industrial-zoned land supporting major businesses is often re-zoned for residential use, particularly along the Brisbane River.

Brisbane's industrial sector needs better support to continue its growth, according to a new council report.

As the city's formerly industrial centre becomes increasingly residential, Brisbane's major industry areas - both inner-city and further afield - need to change, the council's Brisbane Industrial Strategy 2019 says.

"Although these precincts are generally well supported by infrastructure, there are opportunities available to promote and consolidate them," the report notes.

"For example, this could include facilitating the efficient use of infrastructure, increasing services and amenity in industrial areas to help attract a talented workforce and realising the benefits of co-location."

The report lays out six priorities and nine key actions to support and sustain Brisbane's industry.

The report recommended land zoned for industry be protected but also calls for better management of industrial uses on such land to protect more "sensitive" neighbours.

It recommended "flexibility" for regulation to ensure future innovation be supported and the improvement of public transport and infrastructure to major industrial zones.

City planning needed to be used to develop industrial precincts around the city, the report finds.

City planning committee chairman councillor Matthew Bourke said 77 public submissions had been received during consultation on the plan.

“The industrial sector currently provides 15 per cent of all jobs in Brisbane and contributes significantly to local production and exports, with demand for industrial land potentially outstripping supply by 2041,” Cr Bourke said.

“The nine key actions focus on addressing key priorities for industry through an approach involving changes to Brisbane City Plan 2014, and non-statutory initiatives with a future‑focused, strategic approach to encouraging industrial development over time.”

Property Council Queensland executive director Chris Mountford said Brisbane's industrial property market had been a "shining light" in recent years.

“This new strategy seeks to maintain this growth by removing a number of the obstacles
to further investment that are currently being experienced by the sector," he said.

Mr Mountford welcomed the report's emphasis on flexible regulation for the sector.

“Today you are more likely to find millions of dollars’ worth of robotics and workers in lab
coats rather than smoke stacks and overalls," he said.

“That is why it is so important that our planning system moves with the times and ensures there is flexibility to attract the industrial uses of the future, rather than locking up land in a dogmatic way.”
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Old March 14th, 2019, 08:56 AM   #16508
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Gentrification and the combination of the 2000 BCC City plan leads to upmarket restored Queenslanders

Domain.com.au------------------------------------------->https://www.domain.com.au/news/the-q...=pos5&ref=pos1

Quote:
The Queenslander from the year 2000: Brisbane starts to grow up and not out
NICOLA MCDOUGALLMAR 12, 2019

By the year 2000, once we had all survived “Y2K” and the introduction of the GST, the Brisbane property landscape was readying to undergo a significant change.

The 2000 Brisbane City Plan, which coincidentally was more than 2000 pages in length, was a 10-year vision to create a “liveable city”, which included protecting character homes as well as housing diversity and affordability.


There was also a commitment to address urban sprawl and to ensure that each of Brisbane’s local communities had a clear sense of identity and ready access to a wide range of services through the creation of a number of local and neighbourhood plans.

PS Property Advisory director Scott McGeever was one of Brisbane’s first buyer’s agents in 1999 and remembers how the city plan changed the built environment.

“The big thing was the city plan really kicked in to keep a lot of Brisbane’s character and streetscape,” he said.

There was a move away from brick six-pack units in the 2000s. Photo: Tammy Law
“I think that was certainly a game- changer for Brisbane because when I started valuation in the ‘90s, brick and tile units were going up everywhere, six-packs and eight-packs, but that city planning put a stop to that.”

The Brisbane market was to undergo two strong periods of price growth in a 10-year period – one was at the start of the decade and the other was during late 2006 and throughout 2007.

The latter growth spurt was on the back of robust interstate migration, similar to today, but the economy was also in rude good health courtesy of the resources boom.

Big-name companies like Virgin Blue also set up shop in Brisbane, no doubt due to lobbying from then-premier Peter Beattie who was committed to Queensland becoming the “Smart State”.

So it was that more than 100 years after the early days of the iconic Queenslander, the city’s property landscape was about to start building up and not out.

22_Gizeh_st_enoggera_kvemmj
Raising up and building underneath Queenslanders like this beautiful house at 22 Gizeh Street, Enoggera, became popular in the 2000s in Brisbane. Photo: Ray White Ashgrove
The city plan meant that infill townhouse development became more common, especially in suburbs such as Greenslopes, Coorparoo and Morningside.

Renovating became much more popular, too, as property owners made the most of a booming economy and market.

At the start of the decade, buyers were picking up renovation projects for about $100,000.

“It was in places like Tarragindi, Holland Park and Stafford that people were buying homes for $100,000 to $140,000 and doing a quick reno and flipping them on,” Mr McGeever said.

“There were a lot of builders and developers starting up in that decade with the rise of activity in the market and prices rising.

48 Reuben Street, Holland Park
Character homes in suburbs like Holland Park were popular for renovating and selling on. Photo: Supplied
“All through that decade of renovation, people were buying character homes and renovating them or adding to them in a character sense.”

It was also the start of lifting homes to build underneath, because it didn’t require any extra land and was relatively affordable to potentially double the size of your house, he said.

“Raising a home back in those days cost about $20,000 to $30,000. It’s more than double that now,” he said.

Herron Todd White director valuer David Notley said as well as infill development, new houses generally started to get much, much bigger.

The eponymous “McMansion” made an appearance with floor plans of more than 200 square metres becoming relatively common.

The 2000s were a time of change for Brisbane housing. Photo: Tammy Law
Technological change was also having an impact, especially in the types of materials and facades that were popular, he said.

Render came to town in a big way and was popular for units and townhouses in particular, Mr Notley said.

“They went towards the whole rendered brick, a bit of lightweight composite, and Colorbond. They really tried to jazz it up with more of a contemporary-style look,” he said.

“It probably extends similarly to a lot of the dwellings, like the projects homes out in the fringe suburbs.

“You could tell a distinctive difference between that and something that was built with in the ‘90s, which was just a plain brick and tile, or brick and Colorbond.”

Towards the end of the decade, Queensland’s property market had experienced a stellar run, but the onset of the GFC and the heartbreak of double natural disasters not long after would prove to have a lasting impact on the sector.
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Old March 14th, 2019, 03:44 PM   #16509
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John_Gill View Post
and milton tennis courts.........
I'm not sure Milton is a direct equivalent.

It was zoned sport and recreation originally with a long history of community use.

It is part of a green spine linking Milton Park to Gregory Park.

It is right on the line of the original catchment creek and floods like crazy up to the second story of the adjoining character homes.
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Old March 14th, 2019, 06:34 PM   #16510
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https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showt...hp?p=157404338
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Old March 14th, 2019, 11:18 PM   #16511
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KJBrissy View Post
I hate the reactionary acquiring of land for parkland just because someone didn't like the proposal. It happened at Tennyson and St. Lucia. It's an absolute money sink of an approach and there are far better ways to go about things.
The reality is inner city land is always going to be expensive to purchase and convert to parkland. Does that mean we shouldn't do it? Not in my opinion. As we all know, these suburbs are rapidly densifying, which leads to less public open space per person.

Brisbane isn't exactly known for the number or size of its inner city parks (there are much less of them than in Sydney or Melbourne). There are reasons for that, namely due to a historical planning preference for suburbs with the quarter acre block and a backyard. However, as more of these traditional homes make way for higher density living, we need to come up with ways to expand public open space.

Regardless of what happens to the site, I think it needs to be future proofed to allow for a pedestrian footbridge to West End when demand warrants it (and following the prioritisation of other footbridges already mentioned above).
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Old March 14th, 2019, 11:23 PM   #16512
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That's not the point I was making.

If it's zoned parkland, it's cheaper than purchasing a high density development site should be purchased for parkland. Significantly cheaper, especially seeing the developer contributions are based on planned parks, not knee jerk reactions like this.


The footbridge is planned for a different area of Toowong.

If you want planning, acknowledge what's already planned. Ignoring existing planning is expensive and counter productive.
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Old March 15th, 2019, 01:54 AM   #16513
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Toowong Park, Moorlands Park, Oakman Park and Perrin park are all within a few hundred metre of the grace on coronation site.

The site should be used to house the homeless, with a gate that leads to the next door neighbours pool for better utilisation of facilities.
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Old March 15th, 2019, 01:38 PM   #16514
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I was going to suggest the bridge and footpath be built right on the boundary line but your idea is much better!
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Old March 15th, 2019, 05:29 PM   #16515
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https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showt...hp?p=157432802
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Old March 16th, 2019, 02:08 PM   #16516
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KJBrissy View Post
The footbridge is planned for a different area of Toowong.
Planned is probably too strong a word, but you are right that there is no need for the Sunland site specifically to be used for the bridge.

The Glenny Street road reserve extends right up to the foreshore. Even if that doesn't provide enough space for the bridge to land/DDA grades etc., then there are smaller properties on Archer Street that I'm sure could be acquired for substantially less than the old ABC site.
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Old March 17th, 2019, 09:24 AM   #16517
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Does anyone know the exact reason O'Malley's is closing?
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Old March 17th, 2019, 09:46 AM   #16518
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They're claiming rising rents, but I think a big part of it was that they didn't have a point of difference that drew in customers. If you don't have that x factor, you're only going to be a mediocre venue at best.
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Old March 17th, 2019, 12:24 PM   #16519
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I agree with you Nathan. They did well at first but then let the live entertainment slip. Whether lack of money or lack of custom caused that to happen. Their Sunday sessions were a disaster. They kept on Ger Fennerley and he just didn't draw anybody. I never went on Friday or Saturday nights so I don't know what the crowds were like.
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Old March 18th, 2019, 03:42 AM   #16520
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O'Malleys!

I was there on Saturday for a while and it had a good crowd in. It was after the parade, and they probably had a good crowd the next day which actually was St Patrick's day too. I was too hungover to even think about going near a pub on Sunday (I'm getting old).

Reasons they may be closing could be the prices, I was onto vodkas by that stage, and a vodka and coke was $12. Even for the city that is pricey. Maybe they upped the prices to gouge the guaranteed St Pat's crowd. Irish Murphy's was charging $10 for the same drink.

I preferred the old O'Malleys which was up the street a little. The present one feels like a total fire trap, at the bottom of all of those stairs.
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