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Old August 13th, 2019, 08:55 AM   #26641
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Japanese govt to invite African high school students to study in Japan

The Foreign Ministry will launch a project to invite African high school students to study in Japan, aiming to deepen young Africans’ understanding of Japan and foster human resources who can play an active role in Japanese companies and other organizations in the future.

The ministry aims to accept students from all 54 countries in Africa over the next three years. The project will be announced by the government at the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD) to be held in Yokohama from Aug. 28 to 30.

According to the ministry, students from African countries account for only 0.4 percent of foreign nationals studying in Japan with the sponsorship of the Japanese government. There are overseas study programs through which philanthropists provide financial assistance on a private basis and short-term visiting programs for African youths, but Japan has weaker ties with Africa compared to other regions when it comes to youth exchanges.

At the TICAD in 2013, the Japanese government unveiled the ABE initiative to receive young Africans with the aim of developing human resources through professional education at graduate schools in Japan and internships at companies.

However, since many Africans use English in their daily lives and studies, they have few opportunities to use Japanese.

The envisaged program will lower the age eligible for the project and focus on exchanges with Japanese people. Specifically, the government plans to have African high school students stay with Japanese volunteer families for about a year and go to local high schools.

The Foreign Ministry will bear the necessary costs and expects to receive about 20 African people in the first year.

“In order for Japanese companies to take root in Africa, they need to have local executive candidates who can serve as guides,” a senior Foreign Ministry official said. “We hope young Africans will become familiar with Japanese language and culture, and be able to serve as a bridge between Japan and Africa.”

https://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0005936266
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Old August 13th, 2019, 02:09 PM   #26642
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Old August 13th, 2019, 02:10 PM   #26643
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Nissan, BMW in Talks to Pull South Africa Into Electric Car Era

Petrol, diesel dominate market in birthplace of Elon Musk
Local factories need to switch to electric cars for export

Nissan Motor Co., BMW AG and Volkswagen AG are among carmakers in talks to bring the electric-car revolution to South Africa, as the nation’s auto-factory floors risk being left behind in the global switch to greener vehicles.

The industry is preparing a unified stance on electrification to present to the government by the end of the year, Mike Mabasa, chief executive officer of the National Association of Automobile Manufacturers of South Africa, or Naamsa, said in an interview.


Among the goals is persuading lawmakers to reduce or drop a 23% import tariff on electric vehicles to help ramp up nascent domestic sales, he said. Another is to roll out a charging infrastructure in a country where the state-owned power monopoly is in deep financial crisis.

Taking steps to boost the popularity of electric vehicles in South Africa is just one part of the equation. The auto-manufacturing industry makes up about 7% of the country’s economy, according to Naamsa. The sector is one of the more positive aspects of an economy expected to grow at less than 1% for a second consecutive year.
“The country needs to move forward and bring new technologies,” said Mike Whitfield, Nissan’s chairman for the southern Africa region. “The rest of the world will move very fast and if we don’t get going we will be left behind.”


https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...ectric-car-era
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Old August 13th, 2019, 02:22 PM   #26644
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S.Africa's Northam Platinum expects FY profits to rise by over 100% to R2.4 billion ($156.47 million)

South Africa’s Northam Platinum said on Monday it expected its full-year profits to be over 100% higher than in 2018 after achieving record production and operating profit.

The miner said it anticipated its headline earnings per share (HEPS) - the main profit measure in South Africa - for the year until June 30 to stand between 14.8 cents and 16.8 cents, representing an increase of 107.4% to 108.4%.

In a stock exchange statement, the company said it expected to report a record operating profit of 2.4 billion rand ($156.47 million), which it attributed to efforts to contain costs and a higher basket price.

The group had also achieved record production from its own operations, up 7.4% on 2018, while sales volumes increased by 23.3%, it added.

Normalised headline earnings, which in Northam’s case are adjusted for the impact of a black economic empowerment transaction, were expected to rise by over 220% to 1.3 billion rand, it said.

https://af.reuters.com/article/inves...CN1V21JC-OZABS
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Old August 13th, 2019, 04:07 PM   #26645
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Some interesting parallels between Ramaphosa and Macri...both pro-market reformers who are failing to turn around their economies. Yet Ramaphosa has no real chance of losing an election but still hesitant to enact more radical reforms. Internal struggles in the ANC and its own incoherent identity are blocking out any serious reform.

The Walls Are Closing In on Cyril Ramaphosa

When Cyril Ramaphosa succeeded Jacob Zuma as South Africa’s president, he promised a “new dawn” after nine years of misrule that hobbled the economy. Eighteen months later, hopes have dissipated that the former labor union leader can orchestrate a turnaround. The economy shrank the most in a decade in the first quarter of this year; 38% of the workforce can’t find jobs or have given up looking; d massive bailouts for the debt-stricken state power utility are draining the country’s coffers, putting South Africa at risk of losing its sole investment-grade credit rating.

Ramaphosa himself, a respected 66-year-old lawyer who led the negotiations that brought an end to white-minority rule in 1994, is stuck in a political quagmire. While he won control of the ruling African National Congress by a razor-thin margin in late 2017, members of an ANC faction loosely allied to Zuma remain entrenched in senior positions in the party and the state, undermining Ramaphosa’s authority and limiting his scope to tackle rampant graft and nepotism.

The president has axed several cabinet ministers with tainted reputations, replaced the chief prosecutor and head of the national tax agency, and revamped the boards and management of troubled state companies. His efforts to sweep the government clean helped steer the ANC to its sixth consecutive win in May elections. But his detractors in the party have continued to push back against his anticorruption crusade, which has eroded investor confidence. They’ve demanded changes to the central bank’s inflation-targeting mandate and advocated land seizures to address racially skewed ownership patterns dating to apartheid and colonial rule, when members of the black majority were largely deprived of the right to own property.

“A more forceful leader could have adopted a blitzkrieg strategy straight after the election victory and probably been victorious. But Cyril Ramaphosa is not such a leader,” says Robert Schrire, a politics professor at the University of Cape Town. By moving cautiously, the president may have ensured the stability of his government, but at the expense of his ability to effect change, Schrire says. “The opportunity has passed.”

Read more at: https://www.bloombergquint.com/busin...yril-ramaphosa
Not even close. Macri could not even dream to have the political capital, parliamentary majority and voting patterns of South Africa. Ramaphosa's situation is far more frustrating because his biggest enemy is within his own political party. The opposition in South Africa is pretty irrelevant. No matter what he does, the ANC wins.
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Old August 13th, 2019, 08:48 PM   #26646
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Argentina is a tragic story. From weakness to weakness. Its got good foundations so when they DO sort themselves out- i can see them quickly catching up with Chile maybe.
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Old August 13th, 2019, 11:12 PM   #26647
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Cote D'ivoire in particular was much less affected. Probably the least Affected country in WA.
Absolutely not true. One only has to look at the population densities of Côte d'Ivoire at the end of the 19th century compared to the Gold Coast and Nigeria. Same land, same climate, yet almost empty when the French established a foothold there, whereas the Brits had to fight and destroy very populous kingdoms in the Gold Coast and Nigeria.

The only explanation is slavery of course, which emptied the land. It is only under French rule and later under Houphouët-Boigny that Côte d'Ivoire repopulated itself by attracting lots of West African migrants, particularly from Mali and Burkina Faso, and yet even to this day Côte d'Ivoire is still much less densely populated than Ghana and Nigeria.
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Old August 13th, 2019, 11:53 PM   #26648
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Absolutely not true. One only has to look at the population densities of Côte d'Ivoire at the end of the 19th century compared to the Gold Coast and Nigeria. Same land, same climate, yet almost empty when the French established a foothold there, whereas the Brits had to fight and destroy very populous kingdoms in the Gold Coast and Nigeria.

The only explanation is slavery of course, which emptied the land. It is only under French rule and later under Houphouët-Boigny that Côte d'Ivoire repopulated itself by attracting lots of West African migrants, particularly from Mali and Burkina Faso, and yet even to this day Côte d'Ivoire is still much less densely populated than Ghana and Nigeria.
not really. you cant used later day population figures to do that. where people were taken from were pretty well documented. The figures of Nigeria double those in west africa. only central africa, which was engaged with the portugese longer, has more

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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:09 AM   #26649
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Absolutely not true. One only has to look at the population densities of Côte d'Ivoire at the end of the 19th century compared to the Gold Coast and Nigeria. Same land, same climate, yet almost empty when the French established a foothold there, whereas the Brits had to fight and destroy very populous kingdoms in the Gold Coast and Nigeria.

The only explanation is slavery of course, which emptied the land. It is only under French rule and later under Houphouët-Boigny that Côte d'Ivoire repopulated itself by attracting lots of West African migrants, particularly from Mali and Burkina Faso, and yet even to this day Côte d'Ivoire is still much less densely populated than Ghana and Nigeria.


Well firstly it puts to bed that silly theory about fertile land being the reason for population discrepancies. As you said, Ghana & CIV the same, in fact CIV is maybe 20% larger. Fertile land is just one of many factors that determined population eg Japan eg Argentina.

They just had less ‘settled people’. Its Akan people only settled in the area after they came from Ghana and when they arrived it must have been near empty. It wasnt home to any major settlements during the pre-colonial era and the creation of towns is one of the key steps in population rise. Another key step is the division of labour between urban and rural folk which allows for further acceleration of growth- as seen in the early riprarine civilisations of Mesopotomia.

In fact, the reasons for population growth and why some areas of the world are more populous than others are well researched.

War (Paraguay) famine (Ireland), soil fertility, slavery, technology, geographic location, mountains (or lack thereof), proximity to major rivers etc etc

The most densely populated areas of pre-Columban Latin America were Southern Mexico and the Inca areas which are by no stretch of the imagination the most fertile places in the region. The most fertile soils are to be found in the areas of the Guarani but these were very sparsely populated.

Anyone who tries to say that it is just soil fertility does not have a grasp of history nor geography.

Last edited by popa1980; August 14th, 2019 at 09:34 AM.
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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:28 AM   #26650
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The Financial Times says Rwanda has manipulated its economic data

On Tuesday, in a lengthy investigation using data journalists, the Financial Times said Rwanda has manipulated its poverty statistics. In 2015, France 24 had already reported that Kigali had fiddled with its economic statistics.

Four years ago credible insider sources told France 24 that Rwanda had manipulated its poverty statistics. Now, the Financial Times, using data journalists, has reached the same conclusion. The manipulation took place just before a referendum in 2015 that allowed President Paul Kagame to extend his then 15-year rule for up to another two decades. Within this context, Kagame could not accept statistics which would show that poverty had risen.

The FT writes that its “analysis of the survey’s more than 14,000 data points and interviews with academics shows that rising prices for Rwandan families meant poverty most likely increased between 2010 and 2014”. The English daily adds that “there has been a consistent attempt since 2015 to misrepresent the results” regarding poverty.

Rwanda has rejected the newspaper’s findings, as has the World Bank – at least officially, for the FT also published Tuesday for the first time an internal letter that five World Bank staff members wrote to the institution’s leaders in 2015. The authors voiced their concern over what they called “the manipulation of official statistics and failure to provide reliable data openly”.

“Recent developments point to potentially serious reputational risks for the Bank if its Rwanda operations continue in the current trajectory,” the letter said.

https://www.france24.com/en/20190813...-economic-data
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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:30 AM   #26651
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Well firstly it puts to bed that silly theory about fertile land being the reason for population discrepancies. As you said, Ghand & CIV the same, in fact CIV is maybe 20% larger. Fertile land is just one of many factors that determined population eg Japan eg Argentina.

They just had less ‘settled people’. Its Akan people only settled in the area after they came from Ghana and when they arrived it must have been near empty. It wasnt home to any major settlements durinh the pre-colonial era and the creation of towns was one of the key steps in population rise. Another key step is the division of labour between urban and rura folk which allowed for further acceleration of growth- as seen in Mesopotomia.

In fact, the reasons for population growth and why some areas of the world are more populous than others are well researched.

War, famine, soil fertility, slavery, technology, geographic location, mountains (or lack thereof), proximity to major rivers etc etc

Anyone who tries to say that it is just soil fertility does not have an understanding of history.
Japan may be interesting but Argentina ? This was about old world countries so Argentina doesn’t play a part there. The poster is wrong that slavery was the reason the population was low as the pic shows that CIV lost little population to the slave trade.

Im curious and would like to see your research on why certain old world countries had large populations. The discussion removed technology and only focused on why large populations settled and grew in certain lands. Like Indus Valley, the Nile region or Nigeria.
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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:31 AM   #26652
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The Financial Times says Rwanda has manipulated its economic data

On Tuesday, in a lengthy investigation using data journalists, the Financial Times said Rwanda has manipulated its poverty statistics. In 2015, France 24 had already reported that Kigali had fiddled with its economic statistics.

Four years ago credible insider sources told France 24 that Rwanda had manipulated its poverty statistics. Now, the Financial Times, using data journalists, has reached the same conclusion. The manipulation took place just before a referendum in 2015 that allowed President Paul Kagame to extend his then 15-year rule for up to another two decades. Within this context, Kagame could not accept statistics which would show that poverty had risen.

The FT writes that its “analysis of the survey’s more than 14,000 data points and interviews with academics shows that rising prices for Rwandan families meant poverty most likely increased between 2010 and 2014”. The English daily adds that “there has been a consistent attempt since 2015 to misrepresent the results” regarding poverty.

Rwanda has rejected the newspaper’s findings, as has the World Bank – at least officially, for the FT also published Tuesday for the first time an internal letter that five World Bank staff members wrote to the institution’s leaders in 2015. The authors voiced their concern over what they called “the manipulation of official statistics and failure to provide reliable data openly”.

“Recent developments point to potentially serious reputational risks for the Bank if its Rwanda operations continue in the current trajectory,” the letter said.

https://www.france24.com/en/20190813...-economic-data
Saw this earlier. That the world bank rejects this conclusion should put this to rest.
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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:47 AM   #26653
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Saw this earlier. That the world bank rejects this conclusion should put this to rest.
More inclined to trust France 24 and Financial Times in this situation. They have no vested interest in the veracity of Rwanda's data.
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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:49 AM   #26654
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[/B]
Bombardier-led consortium wins $4.5 billion monorail contract in Egypt[/B]


FILE PHOTO: Bombardier's logo is seen on the building of the company's service centre at Biggin Hill, Britain March 5, 2018.
REUTERS/PETER NICHOLLS/FILE PHOTO
(Reuters) - A consortium led by Bombardier Inc said on Monday it had won a contract to build and operate two monorail lines in Egypt for more than $4.5 billion.

The project, for which Bombardier's rail division had emerged as the preferred bidder, would be its largest in recent years, with the company having a $2.85 billion share of the contract. Orascom Construction will have a share of about $900 million.

The project, signed with the National Authority for Tunnels in Cairo, includes a 54-kilometre monorail system connecting the New Administrative City with East Cairo and a second 42-kilometre line linking 6th October City with Giza

https://ca.reuters.com/article/idUSKCN1UV1BI
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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:51 AM   #26655
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More inclined to trust France 24 and Financial Times in this situation. They have no vested interest in the veracity of Rwanda's data.
And the world bank ?

I don’t see why these journalists are particularly trustworthy
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Old August 14th, 2019, 08:58 AM   #26656
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And the world bank ?

I don’t see why these journalists are particularly trustworthy
The World Bank has lent over $4 billlion to Rwanda since 1994 so obviously it is in their interest to have data showing its development programs have resulted in poverty reduction and economic development.
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Old August 14th, 2019, 09:00 AM   #26657
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Africa’s top mobile phone seller Transsion to list in Chinese IPO


Star Market Opening China

Chinese mobile-phone and device maker Transsion will list in an IPO on Shanghai’s STAR Market, Transsion confirmed to TechCrunch.

The company — which has a robust Africa sales network — could raise up to 3 billion yuan (or $426 million).

“The company’s listing-related work is running smoothly. The registration application and issuance process is still underway, with the specific timetable yet to be confirmed by the CSRC and Shanghai Stock Exchange,” a spokesperson for Transsion’s Office of the Secretary to the Chairman told TechCrunch via email.

Transsion’s IPO prospectus is downloadable (in Chinese) and its STAR Market listing application available on the Shanghai Stock Exchange’s website.

STAR is the Shanghai Stock Exchange’s new Nasdaq-style board for tech stocks that also went live in July with some 25 companies going public.

Headquartered in Shenzhen — where African e-commerce unicorn Jumia also has a logistics supply-chain facility — Transsion is a top-seller of smartphones in Africa under its Tecno brand.

https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/07/af...n-chinese-ipo/
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Old August 14th, 2019, 09:02 AM   #26658
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The World Bank has lent over $4 billlion to Rwanda since 1994 so obviously it is in their interest to have data showing its development programs have resulted in poverty reduction and economic development.
Doesn’t the world bank lend all over the world? There may be no motive here and the journalists are just wrong
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Old August 14th, 2019, 09:05 AM   #26659
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Rwanda: where even poverty data must toe Kagame’s line

In landlocked Rwanda, a small mountain state in the centre of Africa, strongman President Paul Kagame has overseen a miracle. From the ashes of a genocide in which some 800,000 people were killed in just 100 days, Mr Kagame has built a thriving economy, clamped down on corruption and lifted thousands of people out of poverty, official data show.

Since he became president in 2000, growth in gross domestic product has exceeded 7 per cent a year, infant mortality has halved and access to education and healthcare has soared. In turn, the country has become a darling of the development community.

The World Bank has committed more than $4bn to the country since the 1994 genocide and championed huge structural reforms in sectors including health, education and agriculture.

Even as some exiled former allies have questioned the government’s economic performance and criticism of Mr Kagame’s authoritarian tactics has mounted, the World Bank’s support has continued. In the past decade, opposition parties have been squeezed out of the political system and dozens of regime opponents have been detained or died in suspicious circumstances.

Mr Kagame was elected for a third term in 2017 with 99 per cent of the vote. In 2018, World Bank funding to Kigali more than doubled to a record $545m.

Yet a Financial Times analysis of government statistics has found that the data look to have been misrepresented on at least one occasion, casting doubt on both the strength of the proclaimed economic miracle and the integrity of Rwanda’s relationship with its biggest donor.

The Rwandan government says poverty has reduced progressively since 2001 in the country of 12m people. But according to an FT analysis of survey data published by the Rwandan bureau of statistics, poverty increased during at least one important period — the run-up to a referendum in 2015 that allowed Mr Kagame to extend his then 15-year rule for up to another two decades.

However, the FT analysis of the survey’s more than 14,000 data points and interviews with academics shows that rising prices for Rwandan families meant poverty most likely increased between 2010 and 2014.

Rwanda and the World Bank reject the FT’s findings, insisting their own calculations are accurate.

“Rwanda’s performance in poverty reduction . . . is unequivocally real,” Yusuf Murangwa, director-general of the National Institute of Statistics of Rwanda, says. Progress was further corroborated, he adds, by the positive trend in other areas including financial inclusion, the expansion of tax receipts and the results of the country’s demographic and health surveys. “None of that would have been possible if poverty had actually been rising, as alleged,” he says.

Critics such as David Himbara, who was head of Mr Kagame’s strategy and policy unit until he fled the country in 2010 over what he says was his reluctance to massage official data, insist that poverty levels are just one of many manipulated figures in a regime where even statistics must toe the party line.

“Every number for Kagame matters whether it is politics or economics, and that is the way he convinces the donors to look away from his repression and rather concentrate on economic development,” says Mr Himbara, speaking from Canada, where he lives in self-imposed exile. “[The donors] can look away from the authoritarian side because he promises to deliver on the economy, so he has to keep showing that the numbers are great.”

https://www.ft.com/content/683047ac-...d-8e884d3ea203
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Old August 14th, 2019, 10:13 AM   #26660
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Japan may be interesting but Argentina ? This was about old world countries so Argentina doesn’t play a part there. The poster is wrong that slavery was the reason the population was low as the pic shows that CIV lost little population to the slave trade.

Im curious and would like to see your research on why certain old world countries had large populations. The discussion removed technology and only focused on why large populations settled and grew in certain lands. Like Indus Valley, the Nile region or Nigeria.


Well im not comparing the Americas with Old World. Im comparing WITHIN the Americas so your point is moot. The most fertile parts of the Americas are the MidWest and parts of Argentina/South Brazil/Uruguay.

The forest zones which gave birth to the Maya and Aztec and the mountainous regions where the Inca predominated are not particularly fertie.

As im sure you did not know- there are 6 widely accepted areas where civilisation emerged independently- Norte Chico in Peru, MesoAmerica and in the Old World- Indus, Nile, Tigris-Euphrates, Yangtze river valleys.

But here is where you get it wrong- NONE of these places were the most fertile places at the time. Why did civilisation not occur earlier in the Ukranian steppes till the times of the Kiev ‘Rus? Here you had vast rich land and it did not require irrigation unlike the others. All you had to do was plant in the chernozem and wait for the rain. Yet even today Ukraine has a measly 45 million people.

This is where your lack of knowlege on history, geography and agriculture gets exposed again.

In Africa- the most fertile soils are found along the Mediterrenean coast (this part of Africa supplied 60% of the wheat of the Roman Empire), along the Nile, and in the Rift Valley especially. Out of these the Volcanic soils are the most rich. If you analyse where these soils are- you will find no correlation betwen them and greater population. Why wasnt the Rift Valley densely populated pre-colonially?
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