African Business and Economy News - Page 1339 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > General Forums > Business, Economy and Infrastructure

Business, Economy and Infrastructure Our architecture, infrastructure, transport, economy and other related discussions


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old August 20th, 2019, 04:08 PM   #26761
Olivilo
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 142
Likes (Received): 92

Quote:
Originally Posted by popa1980 View Post
If the USA had as many bases in SSA as France did
The US have more bases in Africa than France. They are just not been made public, like the one in Niger revealed by the New York Times.
Quote:
Originally Posted by popa1980 View Post
NB the British dont maintain any permanent bases in SSA. They only have a single training camp base in Kenya.
That's because the British are weak and play poodles to the Americans, not because they are some kind of benevolent power.
Quote:
Originally Posted by popa1980 View Post
Be under no illusions, the French are there not to keep peace per se but no protect their interests
Which country is not there to protect their interests? I'm yet to find an altruistic country not seeking their interest first.

If France's interests and African interests align, like in Mali, or in Côte d'Ivoire in 2011 when they helped remove the sorry loser Laurent Gbagbo from his presidential bunker, then it's good for everybody. If they don't align, of course it should be criticized, but by and large, the Gulf Arabs have played a far more nefarious role than France in Africa, and yet nobody criticizes them, go figure!

PS: This is an economic thread, so I don't see the point of Umoja spamming it with articles about French military bases. He has already created his anti-France threads in the Oasis where he can play in the sand without polluting the serious threads elsewhere.
Olivilo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old August 20th, 2019, 04:51 PM   #26762
Nostra
Registered User
 
Nostra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Johannesburg
Posts: 4,463
Likes (Received): 2586

Damn, a Soweto boy made good!
__________________
"Ex Africa semper aliquid novi" - Nostra the Great
Nostra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 05:43 PM   #26763
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,279
Likes (Received): 8067

This graph shows why South African won't need an IMF loan soon

The prospect of an IMF loan continues to unnerve South Africans, despite the insistence from the feared lender that the country doesn’t need its help.

The IMF has a reputation for demanding painful commitments, including higher taxes, pension reforms and even fuel price hikes. Recently, its harsh measures in Greece and Argentina, as well as Pakistan, have come under fire.

A new report by Futuregrowth, South Africa’s biggest specialist fixed-income investment manager, confirms that requiring help from the IMF is “not a realistic expectation in the near term”.

While it still believes that South Africa’s state finances are in a dire state, with public-sector debt more than doubling in the past ten years, Futuregrowth says the government has been “astute” by borrowing money in rands.

“The so-called ‘original sin’ of foreign currency debt issuance has been well avoided, with a modest 5.5% of outstanding gross government debt denominated in foreign currency.”

This means that only 5.5% of government bonds are not in rands. This is a massive boon: when the rand weakens, government doesn’t have to pay back more to foreign debtors. Its interest payments remain unchanged.

This is the crucial difference between South Africa and the group of countries that have fallen off the fiscal cliff in the past decade, says Futuregrowth.



Another thing in South Africa’s favour is its sophisticated financial markets, and the ease of access foreigners have to invest in local bonds.

Currently, foreigners own 37% of outstanding government bonds – this compares well with emerging market peers with comparatively deep, liquid financial markets:



https://www.businessinsider.co.za/fu...on-imf-2019-8?
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old August 20th, 2019, 06:28 PM   #26764
popa1980
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,097
Likes (Received): 4267

Quote:
Originally Posted by Olivilo View Post
The US have more bases in Africa than France. They are just not been made public, like the one in Niger revealed by the New York Times.

That's because the British are weak and play poodles to the Americans, not because they are some kind of benevolent power.

Which country is not there to protect their interests? I'm yet to find an altruistic country not seeking their interest first.

If France's interests and African interests align, like in Mali, or in Côte d'Ivoire in 2011 when they helped remove the sorry loser Laurent Gbagbo from his presidential bunker, then it's good for everybody. If they don't align, of course it should be criticized, but by and large, the Gulf Arabs have played a far more nefarious role than France in Africa, and yet nobody criticizes them, go figure!

PS: This is an economic thread, so I don't see the point of Umoja spamming it with articles about French military bases. He has already created his anti-France threads in the Oasis where he can play in the sand without polluting the serious threads elsewhere.


You mean the drone base in Nigeria which is under construction?

Can you list American military bases in Africa?

No the British just moved on with their lives after colonisation whereas France came up with this sick concept of Francafique, CFA etc.
France just wont let it go.

There have been very few British interventions in Africa since independence compared with France.
popa1980 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 07:39 PM   #26765
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180

Cameroonians outraged by imported rice as local rice left unsold

Photos of many sacks of rice stacked in warehouses in far northern Cameroon were posted on Facebook in early August. According to the group that posted the images-- which works for food sovereignty-- this rice was produced in Cameroon but has never been sold, even though the country imports large quantities of rice every year. The group called it a "scandalous" situation, considering the struggles faced by local rice producers.

These photos were taken on August 2 and 3, then posted online on August 5 by Bernard Njonga, the president of a group that works for food sovereignty and other topics, called ACDIC, or the Citizen Association for the Defense of Collective Interests (in French, Association citoyenne de Défense des Intérêts collectifs).

The photos and videos, which have garnered tens of thousands of views, were taken in Yagoua and Maga, where most of Cameroon’s rice is grown. They show locally produced rice stocked in warehouses belonging to a public organisation that supports local rice growers called the Society for the Expansion and Modernisation of Rice-growing in Yagoua (known as SEMRY, the acronym for the French Société d’Expansion et de Modernisation de la Riziculture de Yagoua).

"The SEMRY shops are full of unhusked rice in YAGOUA and Maga (about 160,000 tons). Some of the stock dates back to 2015", reads the post. "We import and import rice more and more. More than 800,000 tons in 2017 for a total of more than 150 billion FCFA."

According to ACDIC president Njonga, who wrote the post, this situation came about because it is more profitable for shopkeepers to buy foreign rice than local rice.

Facebook post by Bernard Njonga (translated from French): "CAMEROONIAN RICE. 'THE SCANDAL OF THE CENTURY IN YAGOUA & MAGA' STOP!" These photos were taken in Maga and Yagoua, in far northern Cameroon.

"Cameroonian rice producers don’t get any subsidies"

Bernard Njonga told the FRANCE 24 Observers team about what he calls a "scandalous" situation.

hen I went to Yagoua and Maga, I didn’t expect to see so much rice in the warehouses- especially not rice that has been sitting there unsold since 2015!

Currently, the cost of producing rice in Cameroon elevated because rice producers don’t get any subsidies. What's more, transporting a bag of rice between Yagoua and Yaoundé costs more than if it came from Beijing. So, for shopkeepers, it is more profitable to buy foreign rice than local rice. So, Cameroonian rice producers are becoming poorer and poorer.

We think that three things need to be done. First, we need to impose a quota, insuring that local shopkeepers buy a certain percentage of local rice. [Editor’s note: The ACDIC has already launched a petition calling for this.] We also need to provide subsidies to local farmers, and to promote local rice to improve its image.


Nothing out of the ordinary, according to SEMRY

The FRANCE 24 Observers reached out to the director general of SEMRY, but he did not respond to our request for comment.

However, SEMRY did release a statement in response to the post by the president of the ACDIC, explaining that SEMRY had "started to store rice in its shops in Maga and Yagoua in 2017", "in preparation for the launch of […] two new machine lines" purchased by the government to “relaunch the transformation of paddy rice”. This could explain why there was so much rice stocked in the SEMRY warehouses.

However, SEMRY did not respond to the comments made by the ACDIC president about the difference in price between local rice and foreign rice, and the difficulties of rice producers.

...



https://observers.france24.com/en/20...rtation?ref=tw
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 07:46 PM   #26766
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180









https://www.pwc.co.za/en/assets/pdf/...ok-19-2023.pdf
__________________

ekema liked this post
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 07:54 PM   #26767
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180

South Africa’s Wool Sector Has $325 Million Question for China

(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here.

South Africa’s wool industry is on tenterhooks as exporters seek clarity on a Chinese ban on imports of the fiber following an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease earlier this year in the world’s second-biggest producer.

At issue is whether China has fully reversed rules governing shipments of cloven-hoof animal products even though South Africa’s agriculture department in April declared the country free of the highly contagious disease, according to Deon Saayman, the general manager for industry body Cape Wools.

Uncertainty about whether the lifting of the ban means storage requirements for wool from previously disease-hit areas still applies prompted Cape Wools to cancel its opening sale of the new season, the first time the weekly auctions have been halted in about three decades years, Saayman said by phone from the eastern city of Port Elizabeth where the auctions are held.

China accounts for about two-thirds of the country’s wool exports, while the industry generates about 5 billion rand ($325 million) in sales per season, Saayman said.

If it goes on like this it will have a dire effect on the whole value chain -- the buyers, the brokers and the farmers,” he said. “It could have serious consequences.

Chinese authorities initially banned South African wool exports in February, weeks after foot-and-mouth disease was reported in northern Limpopo province. Three months later they allowed shipments, provided the wool complied with World Organisation for Animal Health storage regulations, clearing the export of about 266 million rand of the fiber from the previous season, Saayman said.

Strapped For Cash

Clarence Friskin, the chairman of the South African Wool and Mohair Buyers Association, said the confusion was straining members’ finances. “The bottom line is buyers have spent all this money on wool that they haven’t been able to ship yet,” Friskin said. “They just don’t have the finances to continue buying until some of this wool is moved and clarity is obtained.

The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries has engaged with Chinese authorities and is expected to provide clarity this week, Saayman said. A spokesman for the department didn’t respond to a text message seeking comment.



https://news.yahoo.com/south-africa-...155501452.html
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 08:10 PM   #26768
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180

Tanzania to open first gold refinery plant in October: official



ARUSHA, Tanzania, Aug. 20 (Xinhua) -- Tanzania is set to export fully refined gold from October this year upon completion of the first gold refinery plant in the country currently under construction in the nation's capital, Dodoma, a senior official said on Tuesday.

Dotto Biteko, Tanzania's Minister for Minerals said that once operation begins, the country will be able to establish national gold reserve as called for in the Mining Act.

He noted that it will also enable the Central Bank of Tanzania purchase and store gold following President John Magufuli's directive for the bank to do so.

"This will be the first gold refinery to operate in the country. Previously, gold was refined outside the country," said Biteko.

The government set up 28 mineral trading centers since March this year to improve revenue collection from artisanal miners.

Following the setting up the mineral trading centers, gold worth 60 million U.S. dollars has been traded through the centers and the government has collected 3 million U.S. dollars royalty and clearance fees, Biteko said last month.

Small-scale miners produce around 20 tonnes of gold a year, but 90 percent is illegally exported, according to a parliamentary report.

Tanzanian President John Magufuli said recently that revenue collection from mining had increased over the past two years after his government tightened controls.

"Our minerals have been stolen through smuggling or through exploitative mining contracts," said Magufuli.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/201..._138324245.htm
__________________

BenjaminEli, mat23 liked this post
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 08:14 PM   #26769
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180

Cash-strapped S.Africa state arms firm ordered to hand over taxes - union

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South Africa’s High Court ordered state arms maker Denel to hand over millions in employees’ tax payments to the government, union officials said - a case that has refocused attention on cash-strapped state firms and their drain on the economy.

The Solidarity union sued Denel last month, accusing it of deducting tax and other payments from employees’ salaries then failing to hand the cash over to the South African Revenue Service (SARS) and other bodies.

Solidarity claimed Tuesday’s ruling as a victory in what it described as a broader fight to hold state firms to account. A Denel spokeswoman it had not received details of the ruling but would meet its obligations. She said Denel had approached SARS to see if it could delay payments.

The lawsuit came after Denel, a cornerstone of South Africa’s once-mighty defence industry, said it would not be able to pay employees their full salaries in June and asked the government for a 2.8 billion rand ($182.43 million) cash injection a week later.

Denel’s recapitalisation request, one of a clutch of bailouts needed for debt-ridden state-run companies, has piled pressure on President Cyril Ramaphosa who has promised to overhaul Africa’s most industrialised economy after decades of corruption and mismanagement.

Investors and credit rating agencies raised the alarm in July, when the government said it would give power utility Eskom 59 billion rand of additional financial support over the next two years, on top of an already-promised bailout of 230 billion rand spread over the next decade.

Anton van der Bijl, head of Solidarity’s Legal Services, told Reuters he thought the ruling would cost Denel millions of rand.

It is regrettable that we had to go to court just to draw Denel’s attention to payments that it should have made a while ago.

The company, which produces military equipment from ammunition to attack helicopters, has said it is trying to turn its operations around by exiting loss-making businesses and pushing to win contracts to ease liquidity constraints.

($1 = 15.3485 rand)

https://af.reuters.com/article/inves...CN1VA0SS-OZABS
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 08:36 PM   #26770
sponcer_cv
Registered User
 
sponcer_cv's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Praia - Lisbon
Posts: 739
Likes (Received): 1637

Quote:
Originally Posted by Olivilo View Post
The US have more bases in Africa than France. They are just not been made public, like the one in Niger revealed by the New York Times.

That's because the British are weak and play poodles to the Americans, not because they are some kind of benevolent power.

Which country is not there to protect their interests? I'm yet to find an altruistic country not seeking their interest first.

If France's interests and African interests align, like in Mali, or in Côte d'Ivoire in 2011 when they helped remove the sorry loser Laurent Gbagbo from his presidential bunker, then it's good for everybody. If they don't align, of course it should be criticized, but by and large, the Gulf Arabs have played a far more nefarious role than France in Africa, and yet nobody criticizes them, go figure!

PS: This is an economic thread, so I don't see the point of Umoja spamming it with articles about French military bases. He has already created his anti-France threads in the Oasis where he can play in the sand without polluting the serious threads elsewhere.

How much does french government pay you?
sponcer_cv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 09:03 PM   #26771
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180

Brazil now turning Ghana into a poultry wasteland

The crux of the matter is that the frozen chicken portions being dumped in our market are unwanted surpluses in Brazil and the EU

Warning bells should be ringing in government offices as the assault on the SA chicken industry by EU producers ramps up. If the EU regains its previous huge share of the market, the local industry may reach a tipping point into decline from which it will be almost impossible to recover. Not one province in SA would be unaffected.

EU chicken imports are climbing rapidly after a two-year absence because of avian influenza bans. Before the avian influenza outbreaks in Europe, the EU dominated SA imports of frozen chicken portions. While they were away, Brazil quickly filled the gap. Now they’re back, and the EU plus Brazil could spell disaster for SA.

That disaster is called Ghana. EU producers did to Ghana what they’re trying to do here: they swamped the market with dumped chicken imports, sold below the cost of production and at prices Ghanaian producers could not match.

The result: imports took over and local chicken producers went out of business. A once-flourishing local industry that had provided 80% of Ghanaian chicken have been reduced to supplying only 5% of the country’s chicken.

The effect of that assault is recorded in a touching video called “Ghana’s Last Poultry Farmers” — a televised feature produced by Germany’s public international broadcaster Deutsche Welle. Any South Africans who think imports are not a problem should take a look at it.

A damning indictment of the EU impact on Ghana’s chicken industry was provided recently by the independent organisation EPA Monitoring, which monitors agricultural trade and investment between the EU and African-Caribbean-Pacific (ACP) countries.

An EPA Monitoring report in June 2019 concludes: “The ongoing huge expansion of EU poultry meat exports to Ghana, which have increased four-fold since 2010, would appear to represent the final nail in the coffin of the poultry production in Ghana.

Could that happen in SA? Yes, unless firm action is taken now to halt the flood of imports from Brazil and stem the rapidly rising tide of dumped EU chicken imports threatening the local industry and thousands of jobs in poor rural areas.

The SA industry is fighting on two fronts against this combined threat, because trade with Brazil and the EU is subject to different rules. The industry has applied for higher tariffs against Brazilian imports but, even if these are secured, the threat from the EU looms large because of a trade agreement that gives it unrestricted access to our markets.

It’s the same economic partnership agreement that sunk the Ghanaian chicken industry. The EU has signed these agreements with multiple ACP countries. In theory, they guarantee duty-free access both ways, but in practice, EU chicken imports flood in while ACP countries find it very difficult to access EU markets. This has happened in Ghana, SA, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, and also in Caribbean countries.

Again, in theory, the EU undertakes to help and support local industries. The practice so far has been that any EU aid is directly undercut by the damage done by the flood of dumped imports. EU policy is to support EU producers and protect EU markets, and it’s doing both with ruthless efficiency.

Warning bells from the EU

The actions of EU poultry exporters fly in the face of the EU’s own policy coherence for development (PCD), which supposedly seeks to minimise the negative impact of EU policies on developing countries. This is a concept embedded in the EU treaties: “The EU shall take account of the objectives of development co-operation in the policies that it implements, which are likely to affect developing countries.” In reality, the exact opposite is happening.

That is why the warning bells should be ringing so loudly. EU chicken imports are climbing again. In 2016, the EU supplied 63% of total chicken imports in SA, and more than 90% of the frozen bone-in portions, the key import segment comprising primarily leg quarters, which has done most damage to the local industry.

These fell away to negligible amounts from 2017 as bird flu bans came into effect, but the country was still hit by record import volumes in 2018 because of a rapid increase in Brazilian chicken imports.

Now EU imports are on the rise again, despite anti-dumping duties against three EU countries, and a 30% safeguard duty on those important bone-in portions to protect against import surges. In terms of the EU agreements, these trade measures can be applied despite the guarantee of duty-free access to our market.

By April 2019, the EU accounted for 45% of bone-in imports, and this dropped slightly to 41% in May. But the trend is upwards, and EU producers are clearly eyeing the 90% market share they used to have. And that is likely to come at the cost of thousands of SA jobs, let alone the lost opportunity to create thousands more jobs by replacing imports with local production.

That’s the dilemma facing the department of trade and industry and its new minister, Ebrahim Patel, as they consider whatever new tariffs are recommended against Brazilian imports, the renewal of anti-dumping duties against the Netherlands, Germany and the UK, and whatever new measures the local industry may seek to halt the import flood.

The crux of the matter is that the frozen chicken portions being dumped in our market are unwanted surpluses in Brazil and the EU. Producers there make their profits from premium-priced breast meat, leaving them with mountains of leg quarters and other brown meat to sell off in frozen bulk packs wherever they can. They are price takers, and have shown before that they can reduce their prices to counter additional duties.

...



https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/op...try-wasteland/
__________________

popa1980 liked this post
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 09:55 PM   #26772
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180

Ghana cashes in on slave heritage tourism

ASSIN MANSO, GHANA (Reuters) - In a clearing at the turnoff to Assin Manso, a billboard depicts two African slaves in loincloths, their arms and legs in chains. Beside them are the words, “Never Again!

This is “slave river,” where captured Ghanaians submitted to a final bath before being shipped across the Atlantic into slavery centuries ago, never to return to the land of their birth. Today, it is a place of somber homecoming for the descendants of those who spent their lives as someone else’s property.

The popularity of the site has swelled this year, 400 years after the trade in Africans to the English colonies of America began. This month’s anniversary of the first Africans to arrive in Virginia has caused a rush of interest in ancestral tourism, with people from the United States, the Caribbean and Europe seeking out their roots in West Africa.

Ten years ago, no one went to the slave river, but this year has been massive,” said Awuracy Butler, who runs a company called Butler Tours.

She said business has nearly doubled this year, which has been touted as the Year of Return for the African diaspora tracing their family history. The number of tourists has forced her to hire more vehicles, she said.

Everyone wants to add the slave river to their tour,” she said. The coastal forts where they spent their last days in Ghana in suffocating conditions are also increasingly popular, she said.

The increase in tourism has been an economic boon for Ghana, which unlike other West African countries has aggressively marketed its “heritage” offerings for the anniversary.

Officials see it as an opportunity to entice some much-needed foreign investment into the economy, dogged in recent years by high inflation and public debt that has needed an International Monetary Fund lending program to fix.

The Ghana Tourism Authority expects 500,000 visitors this year, up from 350,000 in 2018. Of those, 45,000 are estimated to be seeking their ancestral roots, a 42% increase from last year.

On a recent day in the capital, Accra, a delegation of tribal elders and a representative of the Ghana Investment Promotion Centre welcomed a tour group at a hotel in the city.

At an event in a low-ceilinged hotel conference room, the tour guide encouraged the visitors to sing a hymn in a local language, gently chiding them for not yet knowing the tune. “You are Ghanaians now,” he said.

Members of the group, who were mostly African American, went up to the front one by one to pose with a smiling tourism ministry official or one of the robe-clad elders as they received an official certificate of participation. The investment representative launched into a lengthy power-point presentation focused on the need for investment in Ghana’s cocoa sector and the minimum capital requirements for joint ventures.

...



https://af.reuters.com/article/topNe...ampaign=buffer
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 09:56 PM   #26773
Nyumba
Registered User
 
Nyumba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,203
Likes (Received): 4967

Quote:
Originally Posted by sponcer_cv View Post
How much does french government pay you?
Mods can see the ip with which every post is made, this way they can spot who's using multiple accounts.

If this "Olivilo" account is a double of another poster (which probably is) the younger account is eligible for a permanent ban by SSC's rules.

SE9 is vacant now (busy in the UK section), this should be his job. If any other mod is reading this please check the ip out and find who's behind the posts (probably a French section user), then permaban him.
Nyumba no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 10:14 PM   #26774
Umoja
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kinshasa
Posts: 9,913
Likes (Received): 7180

No food shortage here, Zambian government minister tells panicked citizens

The government says it has enough maize, the staple food, to last until the next season and will not need to import

Lusaka — Zambia, in the grips of its worst drought since 1981, is not facing a food shortage and will not declare the situation a national emergency, a government official said.

That is begging,” Chanda Kasolo, the permanent secretary in the ministry of information and broadcasting services, said in comments broadcast on privately owned Hot FM radio.

We are a proud nation,” he added, referring to calls to declare a food emergency and allow donors to provide assistance.

An SA Development Community (Sadc) report in July forecast that 2.3-million Zambians would be food insecure by March 2020, after large parts of the southern and western areas of the country received the lowest rainfall since at least 1981.

Over the same period, the report forecast that Zambia would have an 888,000-tonne cereal deficit.

The government says it has enough maize, the staple food, to last until the next season and will not need to import.

Retail prices for the maize flour that Zambians consume at most meals are already the highest since at least 2003, according to data from the national statistics agency. In July, prices were 41% higher than the same time in 2018, helping to push inflation to 8.8% — the highest since November 2016.

It can’t be a disaster now,” Kasolo said. “It’s not like it’s countrywide.



https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/wo...cked-citizens/
Umoja no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 10:20 PM   #26775
Olivilo
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 142
Likes (Received): 92

Quote:
Originally Posted by popa1980 View Post
Can you list American military bases in Africa?
Here:
Quote:
U.S. Military Says It Has a “Light Footprint” in Africa. These Documents Show a Vast Network of Bases.



https://theintercept.com/2018/12/01/...work-of-bases/
Not to mention the vast US spying network in Africa. The NSA is listening and watching you!
Quote:
Originally Posted by popa1980 View Post
No the British just moved on with their lives after colonisation
They did? Then why do they still hold colonies in Gibraltar, pissing off Spain regularly with it, or bases in Cyprus?
Quote:
Originally Posted by popa1980 View Post
There have been very few British interventions in Africa since independence compared with France.
Simply because they are too weak and reliant on the US.
Olivilo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 10:30 PM   #26776
Nyumba
Registered User
 
Nyumba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,203
Likes (Received): 4967



Nyumba no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 11:19 PM   #26777
ekema
Registered User
 
ekema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 8,012
Likes (Received): 5693

Quote:
Originally Posted by Umoja View Post
Ghana cashes in on slave heritage tourism

ASSIN MANSO, GHANA (Reuters) - In a clearing at the turnoff to Assin Manso, a billboard depicts two African slaves in loincloths, their arms and legs in chains. Beside them are the words, “Never Again!

This is “slave river,” where captured Ghanaians submitted to a final bath before being shipped across the Atlantic into slavery centuries ago, never to return to the land of their birth. Today, it is a place of somber homecoming for the descendants of those who spent their lives as someone else’s property.

The popularity of the site has swelled this year, 400 years after the trade in Africans to the English colonies of America began. This month’s anniversary of the first Africans to arrive in Virginia has caused a rush of interest in ancestral tourism, with people from the United States, the Caribbean and Europe seeking out their roots in West Africa.

Ten years ago, no one went to the slave river, but this year has been massive,” said Awuracy Butler, who runs a company called Butler Tours.

She said business has nearly doubled this year, which has been touted as the Year of Return for the African diaspora tracing their family history. The number of tourists has forced her to hire more vehicles, she said.

Everyone wants to add the slave river to their tour,” she said. The coastal forts where they spent their last days in Ghana in suffocating conditions are also increasingly popular, she said.

The increase in tourism has been an economic boon for Ghana, which unlike other West African countries has aggressively marketed its “heritage” offerings for the anniversary.

Officials see it as an opportunity to entice some much-needed foreign investment into the economy, dogged in recent years by high inflation and public debt that has needed an International Monetary Fund lending program to fix.

The Ghana Tourism Authority expects 500,000 visitors this year, up from 350,000 in 2018. Of those, 45,000 are estimated to be seeking their ancestral roots, a 42% increase from last year.

On a recent day in the capital, Accra, a delegation of tribal elders and a representative of the Ghana Investment Promotion Centre welcomed a tour group at a hotel in the city.

At an event in a low-ceilinged hotel conference room, the tour guide encouraged the visitors to sing a hymn in a local language, gently chiding them for not yet knowing the tune. “You are Ghanaians now,” he said.

Members of the group, who were mostly African American, went up to the front one by one to pose with a smiling tourism ministry official or one of the robe-clad elders as they received an official certificate of participation. The investment representative launched into a lengthy power-point presentation focused on the need for investment in Ghana’s cocoa sector and the minimum capital requirements for joint ventures.

...



https://af.reuters.com/article/topNe...ampaign=buffer
"cashes" in is a disrespectful way to present this
__________________

Olivilo liked this post
ekema no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2019, 11:47 PM   #26778
popa1980
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,097
Likes (Received): 4267

Quote:
Originally Posted by Olivilo View Post
Here:



Not to mention the vast US spying network in Africa. The NSA is listening and watching you!



They did? Then why do they still hold colonies in Gibraltar, pissing off Spain regularly with it, or bases in Cyprus?



Simply because they are too weak and reliant on the US.


These arent facts. These are postulations.

The French actually have concrete fixed camps.

Britain has Gibraltar, Spain has Ceuta.

The Brits made a cleaner break with their colonies than the French who decided to stick around like a jilted lover who wont take ‘no’ for an answer.

Your paternalistic attitude reflects Francafrique.

The sooner this cancer is removed from Africac, the better.
popa1980 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2019, 03:35 AM   #26779
Nostra
Registered User
 
Nostra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Johannesburg
Posts: 4,463
Likes (Received): 2586

Oh so you don't genuflect to all whites, only the anglos? Schizophrenia doesn't even begin to describe your affliction.
__________________
"Ex Africa semper aliquid novi" - Nostra the Great
Nostra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2019, 03:59 AM   #26780
Diggerdog
Registered User
 
Diggerdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,482
Likes (Received): 2626

Quote:
Originally Posted by NicSA View Post
Makes you wonder what criteria they use in Nigeria and DRC etc to guess their unemployment figures. I think they count subsistence farming as employment, right? Which would explain why they somehow have lower unemployment than SA despite the 'workforce' not actually earning any money...
Diggerdog no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
South African Economic News and Developments Harkeb Business, Economy and Services 894 December 20th, 2017 03:35 PM
Nigeria: an African emerging market economy (only news) Matthias Offodile Business and Economy 1716 August 10th, 2008 11:14 PM


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:55 AM. • styleid: 14


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us