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Old August 15th, 2019, 01:33 PM   #441
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Can anyone recommend books-albums that are illustrated and with interesting information about Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque architecture?
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Old August 16th, 2019, 08:50 PM   #442
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Would google books help? I've tried typing and this-is-what-I-got.

Sharing names would be helpful, for instance I can learn a lot more about what the Baroque epoch was all about by gazing at an Artemisia Gentileschi painting than by looking at a building. It was an overly rich, and equally melodramatic style. I don't think it aspired to look pretty. They were seeking tacky, and they achieved tacky, with a certain darkness that was meant to be a part of the Baroque style ever since the start.

I hope other users can provide more helpful insight to you.
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Old August 16th, 2019, 09:26 PM   #443
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
Would google books help? I've tried typing and this-is-what-I-got.

Sharing names would be helpful, for instance I can learn a lot more about what the Baroque epoch was all about by gazing at an Artemisia Gentileschi painting than by looking at a building. It was an overly rich, and equally melodramatic style. I don't think it aspired to look pretty. They were seeking tacky, and they achieved tacky, with a certain darkness that was meant to be a part of the Baroque style ever since the start.

I hope other users can provide more helpful insight to you.
I need a concrete example(s) not some random search results. Because I have some books about Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Modernism, Modern architecture, civil engineering etc. and some of them are very disappointing.
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Old August 31st, 2019, 11:22 PM   #444
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Nidaros Cathedral | Trondheim | NORWAY

I. It is built over the burial site of King Olav II (c. 995-1030, reigned 1015-1028),
who became the patron saint of the nation, and is the traditional location for the consecration of new kings of Norway.
II. It was built over a long period of 230 years, from 1070 to 1300 when it was substantially completed.
But additional work, additions and renovations continued occasionally intermittently for seven more centuries until 2001.
III. Nidaros is the northernmost medieval cathedral in the world.





Un monde inclus/An encapsulated world/En inkapslad vńrld [Explore] by Christian Barrette, on Flickr


Nidaros Cathedral, Trondheim (1300, 2001) by A.Davey, on Flickr


P8150787 by Maria Slominski, on Flickr


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Nidarosdomen by Berserkn, on Flickr
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Old September 1st, 2019, 03:12 PM   #445
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Glasgow Cathedral | Glasgow | SCOTLAND

I. The history of the cathedral is linked with that of the city,
and is allegedly located where the patron saint of Glasgow, Saint Mungo, built his church.
II. Built before the Reformation from the late 12th century onwards
and serving as the seat of the Bishop and later the Archbishop of Glasgow,
the building is a superb example of Scottish Gothic architecture.
III. It is also one of the few Scottish medieval churches (and the only medieval cathedral on the Scottish mainland)
to have survived the Reformation not unroofed.





Source


Glasgow Cathedral by nigel cole, on Flickr


Glasgow cathedral by Mßria Gßcsi- Kis, on Flickr


Glasgow Inner High Kirk by Lawrence OP, on Flickr


Glasgow Cathedral by Joshi_H67, on Flickr


Glasgow by insomniac 2.0, on Flickr

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Old September 1st, 2019, 03:23 PM   #446
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RokasLT View Post
Can anyone recommend books-albums that are illustrated and with interesting information about Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque architecture?
The Art of Gothic, edited by Rolf Toman, 2004. Great illustrated book.
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Old September 1st, 2019, 05:01 PM   #447
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Canterbury Cathedral | Canterbury | ENGLAND

🕂

I. Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt between 1070 and 1077.
II. The east end was greatly enlarged at the beginning of the 12th century, and largely rebuilt in the Gothic style following a fire in 1174,
to accommodate the flow of pilgrims visiting the shrine of Thomas Becket, the archbishop who was murdered in the cathedral in 1170.
III. The Norman nave and transepts survived until the late 14th century,
when they were demolished to make way for the present structures.





Canterbury Cathedral Aerial by John Fielding, on Flickr


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Canterbury Cathedral by Jean Bloor, on Flickr


Canterbury Cathedral by Hagen ThŘrling, on Flickr


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Gabriel by Aidan McRae Thomson, on Flickr


Inside Canterbury Cathedral by kerry Hilden, on Flickr


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Old September 2nd, 2019, 11:09 AM   #448
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nice updates !!!
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Old September 3rd, 2019, 06:14 PM   #449
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Even I don't know how many times we've had this one on the previous pages, but it's the epitome of Gothic Architecture.

Cologne Cathedral | Cologne | GERMANY

I. Construction of Cologne Cathedral began in 1248 but was halted in 1473, unfinished.
II. Work did not restart until the 1840s, and the edifice was completed to its original Medieval plan in 1880.
III. The cathedral is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spires.
IV. The towers for its two huge spires give the cathedral the largest fašade of any church in the world.



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Old September 7th, 2019, 11:22 AM   #450
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Orvieto Cathedral | Orvieto | ITALY

I. The construction of the cathedral lasted almost three centuries with the design and style evolving from Romanesque to Gothic as construction progressed.
II. The flagstone of the cathedral was laid on 13 November 1290.
III. The cathedral was initially designed as a Romanesque basilica with a nave and two side aisles.
IV. However, with Giovanni di Uguccione the design was transformed into Italian Gothic forms.
V. Construction continued slowly until, in 1309, the Sienese sculptor and architect Lorenzo Maitani
substantially changed the design and construction of the building, increasing the similarity of the building to Siena Cathedral.





Il duomo d'Orvieto by Dan Diffendale, on Flickr


orvieto cathedral by edna astronomia-estrada, on Flickr



Orvieto by Robert Grant, on Flickr


Duomo detail 11 by Brian J. Geiger, on Flickr


Duomo detail 12 by Brian J. Geiger, on Flickr


Duomo detail 9 by Brian J. Geiger, on Flickr


Duomo di Orvieto by Egon Abresparr, on Flickr


Cathedral of Orvieto, Italy by Thomas WŘstefeld, on Flickr


DSC_3181 The Chapel of San Brizio (Duomo di Orvieto) by Benny, on Flickr


Chapel of the Madonna di San Brizio in the Duomo, Orvieto by Andy Hay, on Flickr


Duomo di Orvieto 99 by David O'Malley, on Flickr
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Old September 7th, 2019, 02:34 PM   #451
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The Gothic architecture made its debut in Italy in the 12 century.
Howsoever, the Italians weren't much into the pointed arch (they still prize the round arch), so they kept mixing this architectural style with Romanesque elements and Byzantine mosaics.

In the next few posts I'll be focusing a little more on the authenticity of the distinctively eclectic Italian Gothic.
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Old September 7th, 2019, 03:25 PM   #452
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Florence Cathedral | Florence | ITALY

I. It was begun in 1296 in the Gothic style to a design of Arnolfo di Cambio and was structurally completed by 1436,
with the dome designed by Filippo Brunelleschi.
II. The exterior of the basilica is faced with polychrome marble panels in various shades of green and pink, bordered by white.
III. It has an elaborate 19th-century Gothic Revival fašade by Emilio De Fabris.






Source



Source


Florence Cathedral 83 by Sanyam Bahga, on Flickr



Source


Florence Cathedral by Eric van Wijk, on Flickr


Florence-016.jpg by Alexander Kor, on Flickr


Florence Cathedral by Philip Wood Photography, on Flickr


Florence Cathedral by flickr gingr, on Flickr


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Florence Cathedral by Dan Nguyen, on Flickr


Florence Cathedral by Rebekah Landy, on Flickr


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