The Big Space Exploration Thread - Page 237 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Fun Forums > Space, Science & Technology

Space, Science & Technology shaping tomorrow's world


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 11th, 2019, 03:17 AM   #4721
RyukyuRhymer
普通モデレーター Moderator
 
RyukyuRhymer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: お前のお尻
Posts: 1,907
Likes (Received): 7151

Quote:
Originally Posted by LADEN View Post
I don't understand why we can't get an image of the one in our own Milky Way galaxy?
I forgot the exact wording, but the reason was a combination of the level of brightness in our own galaxy and high amount of dust, making it very hard to see.

I guess a good analogy is.. your living room is full of crap making it hard to see the other end, but when you look out your window, its very easy to see beyond.
__________________
Visit the:
Japan Thread

goodybear, Kyll.Ing. liked this post
RyukyuRhymer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old April 11th, 2019, 08:10 AM   #4722
goodybear
I <3 Frankfurt&Melbourne
 
goodybear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Schaffhausen
Posts: 780
Likes (Received): 2069

Yes. More detail in this video:
__________________
#Save Foster's 2 WTC
다시 만난 세계

RyukyuRhymer, womfalcs3 liked this post
goodybear no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 11th, 2019, 06:23 PM   #4723
krkseg1ops
Registered User
 
krkseg1ops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Krakůw - dawna stolica Polakůw
Posts: 2,054
Likes (Received): 1492

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyll.Ing. View Post
Russia will probably continue using it, even if they can't sell launches to anyone else. If only to retain the capability to build them. Maybe ESA will pick them from time to time just to ensure the US doesn't hold a monopoly, but with the relatively poor performance and steep cost of the Soyuz, that might be too much to hope for.

Roscosmos' big problem isn't that the American companies are one generation ahead of any rockets Russia is currently fielding. It's that they are one generation ahead of any rockets Russia can feasibly hope to develop in the next couple of decades. The Angara is already comparatively outdated, and it has only flown once as a tech demonstrator. Even China is developing their own stuff without Russian help already. Add the notorious inefficiency and corruption of the Russian space sector, and its future doesn't look promising at all...


From Wikipedia:

Soyuz-U held the world record of highest launch rate in a year in 1979 with 47 flights. Over its operational lifetime, the Soyuz-U variant flew a total of 786 missions, another world record. Soyuz-U has also been one of the most reliable launchers, with a success rate of 97.3%.
krkseg1ops no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 11th, 2019, 06:50 PM   #4724
Kyll.Ing.
Registered User
 
Kyll.Ing.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Trondheim
Posts: 1,658
Likes (Received): 5409

Quote:
Originally Posted by krkseg1ops View Post


From Wikipedia:

Soyuz-U held the world record of highest launch rate in a year in 1979 with 47 flights. Over its operational lifetime, the Soyuz-U variant flew a total of 786 missions, another world record. Soyuz-U has also been one of the most reliable launchers, with a success rate of 97.3%.
That's launch rate and reliability, which are whole other factors. I'm talking about the fact that the Soyuz can barely seat three people and has a total space for crew and cargo of only 5 m3, all at a higher cost per seat than a whole Falcon 9 launch. The Dragon 2 can carry a crew of seven or 6000 kg of cargo to orbit, which it can return to Earth to boot. Boeing's Starliner has approximately the same specifications, while Blue Origin's New Shepard is slightly smaller. But Soyuz is smaller and yet more expensive than all of them. From an American point of view, it is completely obsolete once any of the above enter service. I doubt ESA or other Western actors will find much of a reason to continue with Soyuz either.
Kyll.Ing. no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2019, 12:28 AM   #4725
sponge_bob
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5,653
Likes (Received): 3461

Israel's Beresheet spacecraft crashes on Moon

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47879538

They don't have a civil aircraft programme so we don't all have to worry.

Still, they got to the moon...albeit a bit too fast in the end.
sponge_bob no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2019, 01:59 AM   #4726
RyukyuRhymer
普通モデレーター Moderator
 
RyukyuRhymer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: お前のお尻
Posts: 1,907
Likes (Received): 7151

a bit unfortunate news


https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47879538

Israel's Beresheet spacecraft crashes on Moon

The first privately funded mission to the Moon has crashed on the lunar surface after the apparent failure of its main engine.
The Israeli spacecraft - called Beresheet - attempted a soft landing, but suffered technical problems on its descent to the Moon's surface.
The aim of the mission was to take pictures and conduct experiments.
Israel hoped to become the fourth country to land a spacecraft on the Moon.
Only government space agencies from the former Soviet Union, the US and China have made successful Moon landings.
"We didn't make it, but we definitely tried," said project originator and major backer Morris Kahn.
"I think that the achievement of getting to where we got is really tremendous, I think we can be proud," he said.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, watching from the control room near Tel Aviv, said: "If at first you don't succeed, you try again."
__________________
Visit the:
Japan Thread
RyukyuRhymer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2019, 02:57 AM   #4727
krkseg1ops
Registered User
 
krkseg1ops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Krakůw - dawna stolica Polakůw
Posts: 2,054
Likes (Received): 1492

Israel cannot into space.
krkseg1ops no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2019, 09:49 PM   #4728
bd popeye
Registered User
 
bd popeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Cedar Rapids IA USA
Posts: 9,930
Likes (Received): 15445

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Arabsat 6A rocket launch



SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Arabsat 6A lifts off from Space Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., April 12, 2019. This flight marks the second launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket; the most powerful space vehicle flying today. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lieutenant Alex Preisser)



SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Arabsat 6A rocket leaves the Earth's atmosphere after launching from Space Launch Complex 39A on April 12, 2019 at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. This marks the second launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket; the most powerful space vehicle flying today. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lieutenant Alex Preisser)



Two reusable rocket boosters land after the successful launch of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Arabsat 6A on April 12, 2019 at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. This marks the second launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket; the most powerful space vehicle flying today. (U.S. Air Force photo by James Rainier)

__________________
Big Daddy Popeye US Navy/retired

August 1971 - August 1991

I yam what I yam!

Chinese Around the World Daily Photos!!!| SSC

Today's United States Navy...| SSC
bd popeye no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 13th, 2019, 01:04 AM   #4729
Mplsuptown
Registered User
 
Mplsuptown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Minneapolis MN
Posts: 2,459
Likes (Received): 960

The successful launching of Space X and the new heavy launchers are one of the most exciting things in space exploration. I hope for continued success, and some great news for the BFR and it's great explorations of the Moon and Mars.
__________________
I ain't got time to breed

*And Major D., just leave the angry man's post up. - spectre000

Last edited by Mplsuptown; April 13th, 2019 at 01:14 AM.
Mplsuptown está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old April 13th, 2019, 09:11 PM   #4730
japanese001
Registered User
 
japanese001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,169
Likes (Received): 1116

__________________

TatoBebop liked this post
japanese001 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 13th, 2019, 10:41 PM   #4731
AnOldBlackMarble
read lightship chronicles
 
AnOldBlackMarble's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,799
Likes (Received): 6716

Quote:
Originally Posted by LADEN View Post
I don't understand why we can't get an image of the one in our own Milky Way galaxy?
Same reason you can't see your own lips no matter how hard you look down.
__________________
Read my science fiction adventure Lightship Chronicles.com

snot, Svśrtede liked this post
AnOldBlackMarble no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 14th, 2019, 11:05 AM   #4732
RyukyuRhymer
普通モデレーター Moderator
 
RyukyuRhymer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: お前のお尻
Posts: 1,907
Likes (Received): 7151

The world's largest plane just flew for the first time


https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/13/b...ane/index.html

After years of development in the desert north of Los Angeles, a gigantic, six-engined mega jet with the wingspan of an American football field flew Saturday morning for the first time.

"We finally did it," said Stratolaunch Systems CEO Jean Floyd at a news conference from the hangar at Mojave Air & Space Port. "It was an emotional moment to watch this bird take flight."
Stratolaunch, the company founded in 2011 by the late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, conducted the first test flight of the world's largest plane.

Allen died last October at age 65 from complications related to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
In simple terms, the Stratolaunch aircraft is a giant flying launch pad, designed to hurtle satellites into low Earth orbit. It aims to offer the military, private companies and even NASA itself a more economical way to get into space.
The company's business model calls for getting satellites into space "as easy as booking an airline flight."

__________________
Visit the:
Japan Thread

Svśrtede, Munwon liked this post
RyukyuRhymer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 15th, 2019, 10:59 AM   #4733
RyukyuRhymer
普通モデレーター Moderator
 
RyukyuRhymer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: お前のお尻
Posts: 1,907
Likes (Received): 7151

made just this past February, I think its a good animated infographic on the challenges of settling on Mars

__________________
Visit the:
Japan Thread

mopc liked this post
RyukyuRhymer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 17th, 2019, 02:17 PM   #4734
RyukyuRhymer
普通モデレーター Moderator
 
RyukyuRhymer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: お前のお尻
Posts: 1,907
Likes (Received): 7151

https://phys.org/news/2019-04-cassin...X8zsmGhmvG7UB4

Cassini reveals surprises with Titan's lakes

Quote:
On its final flyby of Saturn's largest moon in 2017, NASA's Cassini spacecraft gathered radar data revealing that the small liquid lakes in Titan's northern hemisphere are surprisingly deep, perched atop hills and filled with methane.

The new findings, published April 15 in Nature Astronomy, are the first confirmation of just how deep some of Titan's lakes are (more than 300 feet, or 100 meters) and of their composition. They provide new information about the way liquid methane rains on, evaporates from and seeps into Titan—the only planetary body in our solar system other than Earth known to have stable liquid on its surface.

Scientists have known that Titan's hydrologic cycle works similarly to Earth's—with one major difference. Instead of water evaporating from seas, forming clouds and rain, Titan does it all with methane and ethane. We tend to think of these hydrocarbons as a gas on Earth, unless they're pressurized in a tank. But Titan is so cold that they behave as liquids, like gasoline at room temperature on our planet.

Scientists have known that the much larger northern seas are filled with methane, but finding the smaller northern lakes filled mostly with methane was a surprise. Previously, Cassini data measured Ontario Lacus, the only major lake in Titan's southern hemisphere. There they found a roughly equal mix of methane and ethane. Ethane is slightly heavier than methane, with more carbon and hydrogen atoms in its makeup.
__________________
Visit the:
Japan Thread

Guajiro1 liked this post
RyukyuRhymer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2019, 05:58 PM   #4735
bd popeye
Registered User
 
bd popeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Cedar Rapids IA USA
Posts: 9,930
Likes (Received): 15445



A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket carrying a Cygnus resupply spacecraft is seen during sunrise on Pad-0A, Tuesday, April 16, 2019, at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Northrop Grummanís 11th contracted cargo resupply mission with NASA to the International Space Station will deliver about 7,600 pounds of science and research, crew supplies and vehicle hardware to the orbital laboratory and its crew.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls



A US rocket has been launched from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore, carrying cargo with the space agency's re-supply mission for the International Space Station (ISS).

The Antares rocket built by Northrop Grumman lifted off on Wednesday evening, carrying the Cygnus cargo spacecraft to the ISS. It lifted off at 4:46pm ET (2:16am IST).

The spacecraft successfully separated from the rocket about nine minutes after the blast off, flying on its way to the space station, according to NASA's live broadcast.

The spacecraft is expected to dock with the space station early Friday morning 5:30am ET (3pm IST)

The spacecraft carried about 7,600 pounds (3,450 kg) of supplies and scientific experiments to the station. Some instruments it transports will examine astronauts' health in microgravity.

A Canada-made instrument will perform on-orbit detection and quantification of cell surface molecules on a per cell and assess soluble molecule concentration in a liquid sample such as blood, saliva, or urine, thus sparing sample freezing and storing, according to NASA.
__________________
Big Daddy Popeye US Navy/retired

August 1971 - August 1991

I yam what I yam!

Chinese Around the World Daily Photos!!!| SSC

Today's United States Navy...| SSC

Munwon liked this post
bd popeye no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2019, 07:31 AM   #4736
AcesHigh
Taking On The World
 
AcesHigh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Novo Hamburgo
Posts: 26,277
Likes (Received): 8576

Quote:
Originally Posted by LADEN View Post
I don't understand why we can't get an image of the one in our own Milky Way galaxy?
The EHT was studying BOTH black holes. This one in another galaxy is one of the biggest known, so even being so far away, it's relative angular size is almost the same as the one in our galaxy.

But the one in our galaxy has lots of dust clouds in front, making observations more difficult. But we will probably have an image from it before the end of the year
__________________
http://gremioemfoco.info/ forum do grÍmio, para quem n„o consegue se conter e falar somente do estŠdio, uma boa opÁ„o
AcesHigh no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2019, 05:08 PM   #4737
Ynhockey
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Petah Tikva
Posts: 3,302
Likes (Received): 7217

Quote:
They don't have a civil aircraft programme so we don't all have to worry.

Still, they got to the moon...albeit a bit too fast in the end.
Actually not only does Israel have a small civil aircraft program (business / private jets), but this program is owned by IAI, the same company that made Beresheet.

Now you can worry but actually the Gulfstream jets get good reviews: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulfstream_G280
Ynhockey no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old Today, 01:45 PM   #4738
Kyll.Ing.
Registered User
 
Kyll.Ing.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Trondheim
Posts: 1,658
Likes (Received): 5409

Looks like the SpaceX Crew Dragon has had a minor setback. That is to say, a vehicle they were testing blew itself completely to smithereens on the test stand:

By CunjoCarl on the Kerbal Space Program forums, still frame taken from a now-deleted Twitter video of the explosion.

This was the very same capsule that flew to the ISS earlier this year. It was supposed to be used for an abort test which might have destroyed it anyway, but now it looks like SpaceX has found another scenario to design against. Luckily, it happened while the vehicle was testing and not during operation. Right now, it's a "Hm, didn't know it could do that!" situation and not a "Presidential address mourning the lost astronauts" situation.
Kyll.Ing. no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Tags
space thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us