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Old September 7th, 2004, 12:15 PM   #1
perthwa
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Discussion / Planning and Future Development

Record consultation exercise delivers long-term planning strategy for Perth
7/9/04
Network City - a community-generated planning vision to guide Perth's future growth and development over the next three decades - has been released for public comment.

This morning, key local government representatives, industry and community members joined Planning and Infrastructure Minister Alannah MacTiernan in launching the plan, which will now be subject to a formal three-month advertising period.

The plan is the result of Dialogue with the City, a massive community consultation exercise held in September, 2003 involving more than 1,100 Perth and Peel residents.

Following Dialogue, a representative group of about 100 Dialogue participants from the community, local government and industry worked with the State Government on specialist committees to create Network City.

The resulting plan identifies strategies to manage population growth and urban sprawl over the next 30 years so the quality of life residents now enjoy can be maintained.

The plan recognises that the majority of Perth residents still want a house on a block but more than 40 per cent of those surveyed as part of Dialogue find medium density housing an increasingly attractive option.

It also recognises that everyone can benefit from having more intense development concentrated around transport hubs and corridors, giving local communities an opportunity to have town centres that really work - offering action, entertainment and employment.

"By 2031, the projected total population of Perth and Peel will be more than 2.2 million - a 52 per cent increase on 2001 figures," Ms MacTiernan said.

"For the first time, we have a document that attempts to answer the hard questions - where will these people live, work, learn and play, and how will they travel?"

The plan is guided by three core principles:
-to enhance efficiency of urban land use and infrastructure
-to protect and rehabilitate the environment and improve resource efficiency and energy use
-to enhance community vitality and cohesiveness

"It has been fantastic to see members of the community, including our local government and industry representatives, coming to terms with the issues and being prepared to contribute to developing a plan aimed at making Perth the world's most liveable city," the Minister said.

"In the past, infill development has often been inappropriately placed and created some community backlash - this plan says we can do better."

Some of the strategies outlined in a comprehensive action plan include:
-managing urban growth through the staging of development
-providing the majority of new dwellings in existing urban areas
-developing local strategies and partnerships between State and local government
-promoting increased housing diversity
-revitalising existing suburbs and centres
-developing economic and employment strategies for growth corridors and centres
-protecting biodiversity and areas of environmental significance
-preparing transport plans aimed at reducing car dependency
-enhancing the safety and efficiency of transport corridors
-promoting transit-oriented developments
-developing a whole-of-government approach to ensure all Government agencies work together to achieve the plan's outcomes
-using the provision of infrastructure to influence the timing and location of growth

Ms MacTiernan said while Cabinet had already expressed support for Network City's guiding principles, the community document would now be put out for public comment before a final version was formally adopted by the State Government.

"Implementation can only be achieved through active collaboration with local councils and residents," she said.

"Local government will play a vital role in the roll-out of this vision.

"It is crucial that individual councils understand that this is a plan that requires all tiers of government to come together in equal partnership to achieve Network City's objectives."

During the next three months, workshops will be held with councils across the metropolitan area.

Network City is available online at http://www.dpi.wa.gov.au/dialogue or by phoning 1300 735 560.

Minister's office: 9213 6400

What the stakeholders say……
'The Dialogue with the City approach enhanced local government and community involvement in the planning process on behalf of wider community. The implementation strategy documented in Network City is expected to ensure sustainable outcomes for all sectors of the community.'

Eric Lumsden, CEO City of Swan and chair, Local Government Liaison Team.

'The community wanted us to stop further urban sprawl and make better use of existing public infrastructure. We have delivered this in the plan by focusing new development around centres along high frequency public transport routes. This approach means we can protect the places that are important to community (parks, bush, wetlands, etc) but take a responsible approach to sustainable development.'

Carey Curtis, Senior Lecturer, Urban and Regional Planning, Curtin University.

'Shelter WA strongly supports Network City's commitment to increase affordable housing. Housing affordability in Perth has continued to decline since the late 90s, despite record levels of new housing construction.'

Karel Eringa, executive officer, Shelter WA.

'If we are serious about protecting the important environmental values of the Perth region, then we need to look at all the ways that the city interacts with our environment. A city that continually grows outwards will find it difficult to protect our special bushland, wetland and aquatic areas in the future. Network City looks for ways to better protect our existing natural areas and open space while also looking for all the opportunities to make better use of land in the urban area.'

Nicole Hodson, convenor, WA Collaboration (Conservation Council of WA, Ethnic Communities of WA, Council of Churches WA, Unions WA, WACOSS).

'The creation of a sustainable city is about ensuring that social, economic and environmental settings are applied intelligently and in balance. Sustainability is about creating a built environment that is attractive and serves its citizens - a place that feels as good as it looks and that functions well. That is what the Network City vision is seeking to achieve.'

Adrian Fini, CEO Mirvac Fini WA, Pty Ltd.

'The Sustainable Transport Coalition applauds the development of this strategy as a meaningful response to the urgent need to encourage a greater use of public transport and make our transport systems more sustainable. Importantly, we support urgent action on bringing together planning and transport processes as a response to the prospect of rising oil prices over the 25-year time period covered by the strategy. Evidence is pointing to a future when world demand for oil will be higher than supplies and the cost of private transport will increase. The proposed Network City concepts will allow Perth to avoid the social and environmental problems of similar car-dependent American cities and to maintain our high quality of life for our children, and their children.'

Dr David Worth, convenor of WA's Sustainable Transport Coalition.

'Research supporting the Network City strategy clearly indicated the need to rethink the location and design of employment centres - to provide more potential for recreation, cultural and social opportunities near to places of work. A key to delivering this desire is to provide jobs in local areas to build vital and vibrant employment centres that foster interaction and innovation.'

Peter H Why, chief executive, Zemke Australia, Managers of Technology Park.

'Network City is important for the future of Perth. We are in the residential development sector; the way we are designing and delivering our new communities is changing already. We need our new residential developments to have better community facilities, particularly focussed on improved transport and where possible more local jobs, Network City encourages these things to happen.'

Nick Perrignon, general manager, Stockland, national residential property developer.

Last edited by perthwa; September 7th, 2004 at 12:23 PM.
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Old September 7th, 2004, 12:31 PM   #2
perthwa
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MORE INFO
www.dpi.wa.gov.au/dialogue

HAVE YOUR SAY
www.dpi.wa.gov.au/dialogue/network_say.html
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Old September 7th, 2004, 04:29 PM   #3
perthwa
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Have a look in your tuesday community times (newspaper) for a 2 page ad on the 2030 Network City Plan
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Old September 8th, 2004, 11:00 AM   #4
Dilaz89
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i got it! its pretty boring
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:00 PM   #5
perthwa
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its a great sounding plan, though I would still like 100% of homes within the current growth, with high-rise nodes, and alot higher density development, and less open space, rather smaller quality space, ill make sure I get that in the submission or two lol
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:10 PM   #6
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yeah right... i doubt thats going to happen.. the curretn plan has been bagged... i think several high density nodes should be developed.. i guess around morley (build a train to there)..... osb park, cannington, canningbridge, joondalup, and a few others along the new railway

and encourage affordable higher density husing in vic park and belmont etc:
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:11 PM   #7
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most of the higher density , close to transport areas being created at the moment like subi, burswood are too expensive for most people to afford..
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:19 PM   #8
perthwa
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though if you go cheap then the construction costs will reduce probably bringing ugly buildings, though you don't need high-rise to increase density, even just putting 4 units on a single current block will help increase densities, i really want to see the corridors stoped, the northern corridor is now to big, and its getting really sterile and hard to plan infrastructure, with the swan river kings park etc.. we really need a massive boost in inner city density to have a build up of population close to the CBD

what i like is the return to main street shopping over shopping centres
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:21 PM   #9
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Better public transport the key to less congestion
Planning and Infrastructure Minister Alannah MacTiernan has repeated the Gallop Government's election pledge not to introduce any road user charges.

The Network City strategy was released for a three-month public comment period yesterday.

The plan listed a number of ways in which travel demand could be managed, including the investigation of road charges.

Ms MacTiernan said the State Government would not act on a suggestion to investigate road user charging to address future congestion.

"We strongly endorse the broad objectives of Network City," the Minister said.

"However, we do not see road charging as necessary to managing future congestion in Perth.

"Instead, we want to get people out of their cars by providing a world-class public transport system - the key component of which is the $1.518billion New MetroRail project and planning a city which is more friendly to public transport, cycling and walking.

"What the State Coalition fails to understand is that Network City is the result of the southern hemisphere's biggest-ever community consultation, bringing together local government, industry and community representatives to look at how we can plan a long-term liveable city.

"Instead of engaging in the process, Opposition leader Colin Barnett chooses to stand outside the tent and make wild, ill-informed claims that everyone's backyard is at risk - nothing could be further from the truth.

"Just this morning, the Coalition has claimed that the plan has an urban growth boundary stopping at Butler - there is no such boundary.

"They also claim that metropolitan infill currently stands at 30 per cent of all development. Once again the Coalition is wrong - the figure is closer to 50 per cent, in line with the target of Network City."

Ms MacTiernan said the Coalition's confused approach was highlighted by the following comment by Mr Barnett to Paul Murray on 6PR this morning:

Colin Barnett:
'The big difference between what would happen under a Liberal Government is that we would allow cities to largely evolve in a natural way…but be well-planned'.

The Minister said Mr Barnett needed to explain how he was going to 'plan natural evolution'.
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:22 PM   #10
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i agree... well not cheap buildings but maybe more affordable.... like we dont need river views etc:........
applecross is pretty dense already.. alot of units and aptments........ 4 story aptments etc: that is the way to go.. but around canning bridge should be high rise node above railline.......
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:23 PM   #11
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Barnett is beign a dick on this........... he is going to allow perth to sprawl from yanchep to bunbury
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:25 PM   #12
perthwa
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Yeah fill in the carparks with highrise

btw. they can put units on my local 'park' its full of dead grass, tags, smashed glass, and sometimes needles, and never gets used, if this is perth's great open space and layback lifestyle then ****ya's, there is another very well kept park near my house, so **** crap ones like that! filling in that part could stop the extra bit of city killing sprawl
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:34 PM   #13
perthwa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perthguy78
Barnett is beign a dick on this........... he is going to allow perth to sprawl from yanchep to bunbury
he's just saying what he THINKS people want to here, really I have heard alot of support for this, alot of people will be scared, because perth people are scared of change, but its for the good, and lets hope local councils don't get in the way with there lets preserve our one level streets crap
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Old September 8th, 2004, 01:35 PM   #14
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City Vision Prooves Great, Get Your Public Comment In And Have Your Say
Network City, the draft vision for Perth for the next 30 years launched by Planning Minister Alannah MacTiernan yesterday, could be in for a rough ride.

Two-thirds of the 1100 people involved in an initial draft oppose its core tenet of medium density.

The Minister's press release said that more than 40 per cent said medium density was an "increasingly attractive option" - leaving 60 per cent who do not like the idea.

Ms MacTiernan ducked questions on the figures, saying the issue was about diversity of housing and that backyards were not under threat.

"We are not saying we are doing away with suburbs," she said. "We are talking about under-utilised land. We don't believe there will be high rise."

More than 1100 people took part in a one-day Dialogue With the City meeting last year. Some answered newspaper advertisements, some were randomly selected and others were stakeholders, including representatives of local government, interest groups, business and developers and public and private agencies.

A reduced group of 100 workshopped for 12 months to come up with a framework for denser development nodules in transport corridors and the creation of town centres with shops and services.

Ms MacTiernan said Perth's population was expected to hit 2.2 million by 2031 and government needed a plan to deal with the demands, otherwise "we will live in a city gridlocked and covered in pollution".

The plan calls for housing to increase 60 per cent on existing land but opponents claim parks and open space will go to meet demand. But Ms MacTiernan said there was enough unused and under-used land to meet the target.

Opposition Leader Colin Barnett labelled Network City as social engineering at its worst, saying infill would destroy WA's lifestyle.

Curtin senior planning lecturer Carey Curtis said Network City was a world first in community consultation.

"Normally you would get three or four planners beavering away in-house . . . then go out to the community and ask what they think," she said
http://www.thewest.com.au/20040908/n...sto129273.html
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Old September 9th, 2004, 04:21 AM   #15
perthwa
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Swap that crap car with a bike and this north perth develpment could be a good example of how to increase densities in our suburbs


and more 'interesting' homes like this one

Last edited by perthwa; September 9th, 2004 at 04:27 AM.
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Old September 9th, 2004, 04:28 AM   #16
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http://www.wapc.wa.gov.au/cgi-bin/in...k/network.html
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Old September 9th, 2004, 05:31 AM   #17
perthwa
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Perth can learn a heeeeeeap from melbourne on how to create a vibrant funky inner city pics taken from www.melbournephotos.net by ueweuep (forumer)



































[IMG]http://www.melbournephotos.net/pics/2004-03-23%20Melbourne%20-%20A'Beckett,%20La%20Trobe%20and%20a%20bit%20of%
20Queen/IMG_3497.jpg[/IMG]





[IMG]http://www.melbournephotos.net/pics/2004-03-23%20Melbourne%20-%
20A'Beckett,%20La%20Trobe%20and%20a%20bit%20of%20Queen/IMG_3525.jpg[/IMG]



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Old September 9th, 2004, 05:42 AM   #18
perthwa
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Great news for Rockingham, a shopping centre aint going to get me to visit, more streetside and waterfront shopping will, great to see this plan rejected, and lets hope more councils follow and more shopping centres are designed like the proposed claremont central development, with public squares, street front retail, no street front setbacks, mixed use, open air etc etc.. we want more urban shopping not boring american 'malls'!

Planning Tribunal Recommends Shopping Centre Extension Refusal
After nine days of hearings in the second biggest town planning appeal in the State's history, and nearly three months of consideration of evidence, the Town Planning Appeal Tribunal has submitted its recommendation to the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure on the Rockingham City Shopping Centre development extensions.

The Tribunal has recommended that the development application for the proposed extensions be refused and that the appeal be dismissed.

At its meeting last night, the Council considered the Tribunal's report and reasons on the recommendation. The Council has resolved to examine any further steps that could be taken by the City, now that the recommendation is before Minister MacTiernan.

City of Rockingham Mayor Barry Sammels said that the Tribunal had accepted the Council's position that the proposed shopping centre extensions were contrary to the objectives of State and Local Government planning policies, particularly related to streetfront development and land use integration with public transport.

In its forty-one page report on the appeal proceedings, the Tribunal rejected the landowners' contention that the extensions were merely a refurbishment of the shopping centre.

"The Tribunal concluded that the extensions offered no main street interaction or frontage, and made access to public transport facilities more difficult, which was contrary to WA Planning Commission Policies and the Council's Town Planning Scheme requirements for the City Centre" Mayor Sammels said.

"It is now up the Minister MacTiernan to consider the Tribunal's recommendation and issue her decision" said Mayor Sammels. "The Council will bw seeking her support on the appeal, especially in relation to these important planning and public transport principles".

"The whole rationale for the proposed City Centre transit system was based on the integration of land use and public transport, and Tribunal's recommendation has provided an opportunity for this to occur properly" he said.
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Old September 10th, 2004, 06:53 PM   #19
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Some ****wits Need To Grow Up And Get The Hell Over It
A battle over infill housing that some Nedlands residents say wrecked their neighbourhood has shifted ground, from the council to the WA Planning Commission.

The commission has rejected seven applications to subdivide big blocks in Bedford Street, but the owners say they will not give up.

Resident Tom Donaldson said he and six other owners had been unfairly treated by Nedlands council and were the victims of petty politics.

He said state planners had not taken into account the fact that the council had initiated the idea of subdividing corner blocks but changed tack at the last minute.

He said the seven owners were asking for a review of the WAPC's decision.

"There was a long consultation process and after eight years, at the last minute, the council did a back flip for just one street," Mr Donaldson said.

"For councillors to say they were representing the community was poppycock."

The row over infill housing had split friends and set neighbour against neighbour, Alison Swan told councillors in December, when the street's Christmas party had been scrapped.

Residents against subdivision argued they did not want the character of the area changed.

One man, Mark Dolling, told councillors he had built a new house at the back of his block on the understanding he would be able to subdivide and sell the other half.

Nedlands council was told in a letter that the WAPC rejected the applications because the lot sizes would be below the minimum and average sizes required by the Nedlands town planning scheme and they did not comply with the R10 density of the area.

"Approval of the subdivision would set an undesirable precedent for further subdivision of surrounding lots," the WAPC notice said.

Under planning regulations, the owners have until Monday to ask the WAPC to reconsider the decision or until early October to lodge an appeal with the Town Planning Appeal Tribunal
http://www.postnewspapers.com.au/200...news/007.shtml

BRING ON NETWORK CITY AND THE CITY WIDE BRAWL IMBYS WILL WIN
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Old September 11th, 2004, 02:18 AM   #20
finn
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These complaining neighbours are morons...subdividing blocks is only positive for a neighbourhood...within limits of course. What the complainers dont realise is that this will lead to their property values increasing dramatically!

Chris, do you have any idea what the minimum sizes are that the lots can be subdivided to?

After living in Nedlands, we moved back to our neighbourhood in Sydney, where most blocks were originally very large. Over time, many have been subdivided to lots no smaller than 500m², and it doesnt change the aesthetic character of the neighbourhood at all because the original house remains at the street frontage and a battleaxe block is developed behind it with another house that you can't even see from the street. It actually means that there are more people in the area (but still at ridiculously low densities), so the street becomes a bit more lively I find, and gatherings like block parties have more people!

Besides, our block hasn't been subdivided and is one of only four lots in the neighbourhood that actually has two street frontages (besides corner blocks), so the property value is much higher!
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