Public Transport - Page 3 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > Southern Africa > South Africa > Economy, Infrastructure and Transportation > Urban Transport


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 28th, 2016, 12:41 PM   #41
Marsupalami
Registered User
 
Marsupalami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 4,995
Likes (Received): 1058

First new PRASA trains to enter service in Pretoria in October
Article from July - Engineering News

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...ber-2016-06-27

Speaking at a pre-Africa Rail event in Sandton, Sebola said the first new blue and grey passenger trains, replacing the yellow and grey Metrorail sets, would run on the line between Pretoria and Pienaarspoort.
__________________

NicSA liked this post
Marsupalami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old September 28th, 2016, 05:44 PM   #42
ToxicBunny
BOFH Extraordinaire
 
ToxicBunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Durban
Posts: 3,887
Likes (Received): 217

Are these not the trains that are the wrong size for our system?
ToxicBunny no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 28th, 2016, 06:45 PM   #43
Marsupalami
Registered User
 
Marsupalami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 4,995
Likes (Received): 1058

The metrorail blue and grey carriages are a-ok.
The loco - fiasco relates to the massive long haul freight loco's they bought that are too tall.
Confusing, as both are painted blue.
Commuters don't need to worry though - I think the factory is steadily churning out coaches, so I do hope they can stick to October so we see them in action
Marsupalami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old October 29th, 2016, 07:49 AM   #44
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Role of transport in shaping Gauteng economy




NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2017, 03:38 PM   #45
Marsupalami
Registered User
 
Marsupalami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 4,995
Likes (Received): 1058

Time to question BRT systems in South Africa, says Vadi, Transport Minister

10th July 2017 By: Irma Venter Creamer Media Senior Deputy Editor

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...ter-2017-07-10

South Africa, as a country, had to ask itself some “serious questions” about bus-rapid transit (BRT) systems, Gauteng Roads and Transport MEC Dr Ismail Vadi said on Monday.

Speaking at the Southern African Transport Conference (SATC) in Pretoria, he said that the three BRT systems in Gauteng – in Tshwane, Johannesburg and Ekurhuleni – built at a collective cost of around R10-billion, were transporting roughly 75 000 people a day, with around 65 000 of these people in Johannesburg alone.

“Ridership is not great.”

When looking at the whole of South Africa, Vadi said the figures were probably closer to an investment of R15-billion spent to transport 120 000 people a day.

He said it was necessary to question whether government was “getting value for money” in building BRT systems; whether it was necessary to build “big, expensive, median bus stations”, and whether it was necessary to make use of expensive, big-brand buses.

“Is this the way to go? Is this cost-effective?”

He also questioned the fact that purchased bus fleets were standing idle while matters such as community and taxi dissatisfaction remained unresolved.

Vadi said it had become necessary to “look at reducing the cost of BRT systems and to pick up ridership”.

In his address at the SATC, Transport Minister Joe Maswanganyi echoed Vadi’s sentiments, acknowledging that there “were challenges with BRT systems” in South Africa.

He said it was perhaps necessary to “rethink and redesign” BRT systems so that they could stop “draining money from the fiscus”.

“Commuters are not using it. They are resorting to the same taxis they are complaining about.

“If we need to scale it down, we’ll do that.”
Marsupalami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2017, 05:23 AM   #46
Aaraldi
Registered User
 
Aaraldi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 2,367
Likes (Received): 3909

Why 'less' could have been more (Wall of text incoming)

I am not a big fan of the BRT concept touted by the ITDP. They emphasize to much on mimicking rail transportation by advocating for expensive features like giving BRT buses special branding, building expensive stations, using electronic ticketing, etc. Captive riders (those who will use the system if it is any use to them) don't need them. Less physical infrastructure but more routes (especially circumferential services connecting Soweto and other peripheral townships with employment centers not located in the middle of the metropolitan region) would have had a greater economic impact than the current layout. Reducing the modal share of private motorized transportation is a noble goal but ultimately turns the focus away from the core group that needs to be served.

Converting car commuters to transit riders is an inefficient allocation of public resources. Past city planning conventions made all relevant areas easily accessible by car for commuters from low-density suburbs. The suburban lay-out makes it impossible to provide frequent transit in a walking distance of enough people to justify its implementation there. Even if the government provides this kind of service a majority would continue commuting by car. This is because they don't want to pay extra for transit since they already need to own a car to access necessary amenities not served by transit. Cars allow them to combine multiple destinations in one trip (go shopping, pick up the kids, go to the gym) and the most-underutilized bus/train won't give them the comfort and privacy they think they have while commuting with their car. Even the most expensive incentives will only convert a minority. Car users change mode when important destinations are either completely restricted for them to reach by car or more realistically penalties are introducde for them in order to make them way more expensive to reach by car than transit (through congestion and parking taxes ) or take significantly longer to reach (by reducing road capacity). This only reduces the modal share of cars on radial trips but has little impact on the modal share of circumferential trips (If i remember correctly circumferential trips make up two thirds of all trips of an average suburbanite). It is an uphill battle with no chance of success in a city with too many areas having been designed for car users exclusively.

A captive rider on the other hand relies on transit to access economic opportunities. The more areas are made accessible to him/her the more options does he/she has to choose from. Giving more access to a captive transit community does have a direct economic impact on its economic welfare. Because they typically live in an rather dense and compact urban environment it is easier to reach them with fewer lines in number but with more frequent service. Up to a certain level they are way more tolerant of time than price penalties. Therefore it's important to integrate all transit services into a single fare structure (which is way easier done by printing and selling good old paper tickets rather than trying to implement a complicated and expensive IT infrastructure across multiple agencies and different technical standards) in order to remove transfer penalties and effectively extending their range.

Rea Vaya has a lot of features that ITDP fetishizes. None of them are an imperative to increase ridership but they are useful when it comes to increasing efficiency at a ridership level no Rea Vaya line will ever enjoy with Metrorail Gauteng at least running a rudimentary service. Rea Vaya serves mostly radial corridors either competing with Metrorail directly or serving communities designed for cars. It does not properly integrate with Metrorail, the backbone of urban transportation, making it inefficient at extending the range of access for captive riders. It is also inefficient at offering them access to previously inaccessible areas with suitable employment opportunities because it lacks circumferential routes. It did cost almost $1 billion to built yet transports only 75,000 people per day. This is a cost per daily rider ratio European cities deem to high when they build an underground metro line. This would have been enough money to finance a dense bus grid and many circumferential lines. No fancy high-floor stations but proven Kassel Kerbs. Single ride tickets are printed and sold by vendors and drivers (only at low frequency stations in low density areas) costing less than installing and maintaining ticketing machines at every stop and a fraction of installing turnstiles and an expensive IT system. Organization before electronics before concrete: High-frequency routes optimized to serve as much population as possible without detours; Encouraging transfers instead of single-seat journeys (grid network instead of radial network); Is an area not densely populated enough nor has amble employment opportunities and can't be served on the way between two suitable areas don't waste funds to serve it; Avoid competing services; High-capacity services (Metrorail) are fed by low-capacity services (all forms of buses); Trunk corridors should have frequencies of at least 10 minutes or less but should never go below 2.5 minutes to avoid bus bunching as much as possible. Lines that share lanes with cars outside of trunk corridors should not have frequencies below 10 minutes; Color before concrete where car traffic hinders the bus; Where high-frequency services are delayed by crossing traffic, close roads with low traffic levels, signal priorities at higher traffic levels crossing, over/underpasses only if absolutely justified (if u pour a lot of concrete to get a bus partly grade separated u could have built a proper light rail all along) and so on.

The best thing about 'regular' bus systems is that they can be easily modified and improved without being stuck with expensive fixed infrastructure: The circumferential line does not attract the anticipated ridership? Reduce frequency, change route or scrap it completely. U r not stuck with a decision based on exaggerated expectations because u poured concrete on it. But if ur absolutely sure to pour concrete: built a light rail instead. It is more reliable at times of high demand. It can carry more people at lower frequencies (exceptt u built a ten lane BRT monster cutting through ur city). It is less disturbed by crossing traffic (running buses at a frequency of 30 seconds to match the capacity of a 100 m long light rail train every 3 minutes does not leave time for traffic to cross).
__________________

UrbanSean liked this post

Last edited by Aaraldi; July 12th, 2017 at 08:34 AM.
Aaraldi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2017, 05:51 AM   #47
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Obvious solution is to fix rail...stories like this are constant and depressing:

What it’s like when Metrorail fails

I use the train daily. This past month, I have arrived late at the work almost every day with few exceptions because of delays and cancellations on Metrorail.

Today, was the worst day. Along with many other commuters I was stranded at Parow station on the Northern Line for two hours, from 6:30 to 8:30am.

Some commuters went to the taxi rank, but they found it was full and returned to the station.

I spoke to another commuter who said he had been waiting since 6am. He had luggage and he’d wanted to take an early train to avoid the crowds. He and other church members were going on a camp for the week.

I travel from Parow to Rondebosch with a change at Salt River. When I arrived at Salt River, an unusually large crowd was waiting for the next train. There were delays and cancellations on the Southern Line as well.

The board showed that train number 0143 scheduled for 8:47am was now arriving at 9:16am. The 0147 scheduled for 9:18am was cancelled.

I overheard a woman on her phone speaking to her employer. Afterwards, she told me she is a caregiver in Rondebosch. She was supposed to take her employer to the hospital for a 9am appointment at Groote Schuur. But 9am passed and she was still waiting for the train at Salt River station. She was worried about her employer missing the hospital appointment.

Another woman, who was from Blackheath, said she waited for a train at BlackHeath from 6am, only to get one at 8am. “My employer understands my situation because he also read in the media about the train problems. But I am uncomfortable about being late for work every time. I am afraid of losing my job. I am a single parent.”

The journey home is no better. I normally try to leave at 4pm. What should be a 45-minute trip, often ends up taking two hours. That can be four hours of my day waiting or sitting on trains just to get from Parow to Rondebosch and back.

According to Metrorail today’s problem was caused by “snagged overhead electrical wires at Eerste River and a broken rail at Kuils River”.

I can confidently say, that from when I started this commute back in 2012 the service has deteriorated.

http://www.groundup.org.za/article/w...trorail-fails/
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2017, 07:55 AM   #48
Aaraldi
Registered User
 
Aaraldi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 2,367
Likes (Received): 3909

Agree, Prasa is the main problem. I propose a special mix of Swedish, Dutch and German approaches with more influence given to local governments:

Prasa should be split up into its regional subdivisions and its network outside of the metros should be returned to Transnet. The national government remains with 33% share of each subdivision with the reaming 66% being owned by the respective provinces and municipalities. This would give local governments control and oversight on infrastructure critical for their economy. Each shareholder has to raise capital for injections or investments according to his share.

The new formed companies would be primarily responsible for maintaining, upgrading and extending their infrastructure as well as be responsible for dispatching trains. Additionally they are also allowed to have a transport sub-division to participate in bidding for route bundles. Route bundles can compromise a single or more lines.

The request for bids are issued by a new regional transport body. The regional transport body pays Prasa Subdiv a usage fee for each km a train scheduled by the body is using their network. The body also pays the service providers to provide scheduled train services with the mandated rolling stock. For example the service provider has to lease the new Alstom trains from Prasa. The body itself will be funded partly by fare box revenues and partly by subsides from the governing institutions represented in it. All transit services are scheduled and financed by the body. In the case a governing institution wants more services in its jurisdiction it has to cover the extra expenditure.

Route bundles should be small enough for the winning bidder to provide the required rolling stock (local content preferred) in time.

Prasa subdivided and re purposed as infrastructure provider would have a more specialized portfolio and therefore fewer things to f*ck up. Old rolling stock is continuously phased out by the body which mandates winning bidders to not use trains above a certain age. Each bundle will be awarded for up to eight years in case of full compliance (otherwise canceled before and re-awarded) and new request for bids are issued every two to three years to ensure a continuous demand for locally manufactured rolling stock.

Since all public transit systems in one metro area are controlled by a single body fares, routes and time tables would be integrated.
__________________

UrbanSean liked this post

Last edited by Aaraldi; July 12th, 2017 at 11:39 AM.
Aaraldi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2018, 09:51 AM   #49
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Drawn-out bus strike a ‘lose-lose situation’

When strikes become continuous they harm the economy, while striking bus drivers have already lost R5 520 each, an economist says.
The national bus strike is in its third week, with unions now awaiting a response from the bargaining council on their latest counteroffer.

South African Transport & Allied Workers’ Union (Satawu) spokesperson Zanele Sabela said the unions have proposed a 9% wage hike in the first year and 8% in the second year, to be backdated to April 1.

This is after consulting bus drivers on the offer of 8.75% in the first year and 8.25% in the second year, as proposed by the bargaining council and the Council for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration.

Economist Mike Schussler said the prolonged strike was extremely harmful to the economy.

“This is not a rich industry and it doesn’t have a big profit margin. Ultimately, it would be more practical not to strike continuously,” he said. “The current passenger land transport industry, excluding rail transport and taxis, will need a lot of money to meet their demand. Their new counteroffer will cost the transport industry R4.5 million more.”

He believed there was a good chance unions and employers would reach an agreement as the difference between their current demand, and the employers’ offer, was very small. But it would be difficult for workers to recover from the loss of wages, he added.

“For the minimum salary of R6 900, their current counteroffer of 9% is a R17 difference to the proposed offer of 8.75%. With this increase of 9%, drivers would earn R7 500,” he said.

Schussler considered this increase to be somewhat of a pyrrhic victory.

“Now that the strike is on day 24, workers are looking at a loss of R5 520. It will be impossible for them to recover that money. They would have to make that money up with overtime.”

https://citizen.co.za/news/south-afr...ose-situation/
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2018, 10:16 AM   #50
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

End of the road in sight for Cape Town #BusStrike

The three-week-long Cape Town bus strike for better wages is on the verge of coming to an end as unions will table the latest offer to their members today.

SA Transport and Allied Workers Union spokesperson Zanele Sabela said an offer was made by the SA Road Passenger Bargaining Council (Sarpbac) at on Thursday’s meeting.

“We will not be disclosing the contents until we have reported back to our members,” she said.

Sabela said the five unions involved in the negotiations would hold a press conference at 3pm in Johannesburg today.

Transport Omnibus Workers Union spokesperson Chris Fredericks said the offer looked positive, but said he could only comment once members had agreed.

Sarpbac general secretary Gary Wilson said the negotiations were conducted in a good spirit and he was hopeful that the matter would soon be resolved.

“Both parties understood the importance of getting things done.

“We are hopeful that the offer would be accepted in the same spirit by the members,” he said.

The unions are expected to get back to Sarpbac at 1pm, said Wilson, after concluding their mandate.

“We will hear then whether buses will be available on Saturday or Monday."

The bus strike which has been crippling hundreds of thousands of commuters started on April 18, after three months of unsuccessful negotiations.

https://www.iol.co.za/capeargus/news...trike-14894379
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 19th, 2018, 04:53 PM   #51
folem
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 298
Likes (Received): 12










folem no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2018, 04:51 PM   #52
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Looks like squatters living right next to the tracks so not surprising really.
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2018, 04:37 PM   #53
Caisson Boy
Karoo Prime
 
Caisson Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Cape Town, SA
Posts: 1,209
Likes (Received): 142

I was having a discussion with friends this weekend and questioned why towns the size of Stellenbosch, Wellington, Paarl and Worcester (sorry, focused on the Western Cape) do not have bus transport. Surely these towns that are all very busy and clogged with traffic on a daily basis should have bus routes and reliable public transport. Stellenbosch especially is problematic with very narrow and congested streets that were not designed to support the ever-growing population brought on by expansive outlying areas that have effectively doubled its size the past 25 years. Why is it that this is not explored at all in SA? The same would apply to Mossel Bay. Apart from Cape Town, the only others that I'm aware of are George and Atlantis (as part of Cape Town's network).
__________________
I have a good mind to ring Paris Hilton. I reckon she'd be gropable if she knew what a bunch of airheads are running her motel.
Caisson Boy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2018, 04:49 PM   #54
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

You are right it is very strange... Municipalities seem to abdicate responsibility because they know taxis will pick up the slack. SA public transport planning is mostly a disaster. Cape Town and Joburg have doubled in population since 1994, but no new train lines were built other than Gautrain. In the same time period China has built like 30 entire metro systems plus a national high speed rail network 😞😞
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2018, 08:14 AM   #55
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Some progress:

Metrorail pleased with increased security measures

Beefed-up efforts by rail authorities to secure the city's train network are paying off.

Since March, 70 suspected cable thieves have been netted. Just this past weekend, 10 people were arrested across Cape Town after they were found with 25 meters of copper cable.

Metrorail's Riana Scott says they've been charged under the Criminal Matters Amendment Act for damage to essential infrastructure and malicious damage to property.

“The gathering of forensic evidence does take a little longer but it’s invaluable in securing convictions. We are expecting our first successful conviction within the next few weeks.”

The suspects, some of them belonging to syndicates, were arrested in areas including Nyanga, Khayelitsha and Lentegeur over the weekend.

http://ewn.co.za/2018/05/22/metrorai...urity-measures
__________________

ckbs liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2018, 09:28 AM   #56
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Plans on track for women-only train carriages

The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) might reintroduce “chaperone carriages” for children by August‚ civil society coalition #UniteBehind has said.

In a statement on Monday‚ #UniteBehind said: “Women commuters face specific threats to their safety. This must be considered and prioritised by PRASA.”

The organisation said that it had met with senior management at PRASA and newly appointed PRASA board chairperson Khanyisile Kweyama on Friday. The organisation said PRASA made “a number of crucial undertakings”‚ which included the reintroduction of chaperoned carriages for children.

GroundUp was unable to determine why this service was discontinued years ago.

“[Kweyama] herself has undertaken to make sure that chaperone carriages for children are reintroduced in August. Chaperone carriages will provide children with a safe space and will be accompanied by volunteers cleared by PRASA‚” it said.

#UniteBehind has also called on the rail agency to have separate carriages for women and children.

But PRASA spokesperson Nana Zenani said #UniteBehind’s request for special carriages forms part of “ongoing discussions and nothing further”.

https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/sou...ain-carriages/
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 25th, 2018, 04:01 AM   #57
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Cape Town's new railway cops get the green signal


Cape Town’s new railway police will be operational within three months.

The R48-million to establish and operate the unit for a year is being contributed by the City of Cape Town‚ the Western Cape government and the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa.

A joint statement from the three funders on Thursday said they had signed a memorandum of agreement which would see at least 100 law enforcement officers patrolling the trains‚ tracks and stations that make up Cape Town’s decaying and crime-ridden rail system.

“The unit ... will focus on commuter safety as well as vandalism and the theft of crucial Metrorail infrastructure and assets‚” said Brett Herron‚ the mayoral committee member for transport.

“The unit’s members will rely on technology and crime intelligence‚ and will support the South African Police Service to identify those who are involved in the illicit metals theft industry.

“The ultimate goal is to address the safety and security issues so that we can stabilise the urban rail service in the short term.”

Metrorail regional manager Richard Walker said the commuter rail company would designate 50 members of its protection services unit to be trained in peace officer‚ traffic warden and tactical street-survival skills. They would form part of the new team.

https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/sou...-green-signal/
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2018, 08:09 AM   #58
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Metrorail makes headway in fight against cable theft

Metrorail’s efforts to improve security appear to be paying off, especially in the Western Cape, with the arrest of scores of suspects for rail-related crime.

About 60 suspects were apprehended last Thursday, bringing the number of arrests for the year to more than 70 and about 90 since October when Metrorail renewed its security measures, according to Western Cape media reports. It offered a R25,000 reward for tip-offs that lead to the arrest and conviction of cable-theft suspects.

Metrorail now seeks prosecution for cable theft in terms of the Criminal Matters Amendment Act, which provides for stricter bail conditions and more severe sentences than under common law, Metrorail spokeswoman Riana Scott was reported as telling EWN.

Also last Thursday, a cable thief was jailed for 15 years in a sentence that included malicious property damage.

The Passenger Rail Agency of SA announced in May that a specialised law enforcement unit would be deployed in the Western Cape within three months to operate for a year.

This is being made possible through an intergovernmental effort by the City of Cape Town and the Western Cape government at a cost of R48m.

The purpose is to stabilise the urban rail service "in the short term", Cape Town transport mayoral committee member Brett Herron said.

Metrorail regional manager Richard Walker said the unit would have a two-pronged focus, "primarily to deal with vandalism‚ theft and illegal trade of nonferrous metal and copper‚ and secondly to increase visible policing on trains and stations for improved commuter safety".

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/na...t-cable-theft/
__________________

ElOhEl, Marsupalami liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old June 20th, 2018, 01:43 PM   #59
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

Gauteng aims for integrated public transport ticketing in 2020


Gauteng commuters should, in 2020, be able to use one card/ticket for all their public transport journeys, across all modes, such as rail and bus.

Speaking at the i-Transport and UATP Go Green, Go Smart conference in Midrand on Wednesday, Gautrain Management Agency technical and project services senior executive Tshepo Kgobe says commuters would not need to buy a new card or ticket, but rather use the one they have, such as the Gautrain gold card, across all the different modes of transport.

Kgobe is leading the project to implement an integrated fare management system in Gauteng.

The commuter is looking for convenience, as well as time and cost savings, explained Kgobe. He did not want to consider paying cash for parking, using one ticket for a bus rapid transit (BRT) system and then a different card for the Gautrain.

“We need to get to the point where we become more traveller centric. Smart ticketing allows the traveller to think about their trip as one journey, and not in various bits and pieces.”

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...20/rep_id:4136
__________________

Marsupalami, ckbs liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2018, 05:12 AM   #60
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 9,077
Likes (Received): 8693

MPs get a taste of pain endured by train commuters

Members of Parliament experienced first-hand on Friday the broken windows‚ delays and fear of crime that haunt commuters daily aboard trains in Cape Town.

"The lady at the ticket station couldn't tell us how long the delay would be. There were people waiting with no places to sit. On the train itself there were no windows. You really felt unsafe in the freezing cold in winter‚" said DA MP Manny de Freitas.

He was speaking after a train journey from Nyanga train station to Cape Town station with fellow MP Zakhele Mbhele and DA Western Cape metro chairperson Grant Twigg.

De Freitas said none of the electronic signage was in a working condition.

Twigg said there was no security on the train since the group left Nyanga station.

Metrorail passenger trains have earned a bad reputation in the city‚ thanks to repeated acts of vandalism‚ arson‚ delays and being targeted by criminals.

Three railway carriages worth millions of rands were set alight at Steenberg Railway Station on Monday. One person died when a train was torched on May 30. A third train was damaged by fire on May 22 in Cape Town.

De Freitas said he would meet board members of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) to challenge them to undertake a journey and experience the conditions endured by passengers.

Jean-Pierre Smith‚ the city's mayco member for safety and security‚ said the priority was to make trains safer for commuters.

"A big part of the crisis is the safety issue. There are multiple issues where government drops the ball and we as the City have to pick it up‚" he said. "The City has recently taken a decision to explore whether we can take over the train service. We need to make it safer‚ that is one thing that we can immediately do."

https://www.timeslive.co.za/politics...ain-commuters/
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us