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Old August 22nd, 2019, 02:13 PM   #26821
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What is the difference between Xi Jipping and Mohammed VI ?
Are you impliying I defend Mohammed VI?
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 02:13 PM   #26822
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These f***s are democracies...Keep supporting China until you get a taste of what they really are...or just ask Tibetans, Muslims and Hong Kongers...
Democracies therefore what? Democracies haven’t done the same things?
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 02:16 PM   #26823
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Russia-Africa: Putin’s continental strategy

From south of the Sahara all the way north to the Maghreb, Vladimir Putin wants his country to play a leading role in Africa, as it did during the Cold War.

From October 22 – 24, the Russian city of Sochi, on the Black Sea Coast, will host the first ever Russia-Africa Summit.

Putin has since visited Libya (2008) and Egypt (2015 and 2017). But the only country in sub-Saharan Africa the Russian president has visited is South Africa.

This shows how little interest he has in the south of the continent, at least on a personal level. And yet it was in Johannesburg, in July 2018 during the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) summit – a block of five emerging countries meant to counterbalance the West – that Putin launched his big idea: to organise a Russia-Africa summit.

It will be a first in the history of his country. Long faded are the memories from the 1970s of the relations that united a continent in the process of decolonisation while the USSR pursued its campaign of Third World solidarity.

According to Mikhail Bogdanov, Putin’s special envoy for the Middle East and Africa, the enthusiasm is such that this summit will take place”every two or three years” going forward. He and foreign minister Sergei Lavrov have spared no effort, increasing their travel on the continent since the beginning of the year to prepare the diplomatic and commercial ground.

Among those announced are Angola’s President João Lourenço, South Africa’s Cyril Ramaphosa, Côte d’Ivoire’s Alassane Ouattara, Mali’s Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta, Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC) Félix Tshisekedi, Madagascar’s Andry Rajoelina and Egypt’s Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who, in his capacity as president of the African Union, will be master of ceremonies alongside Putin.

https://www.theafricareport.com/1633...ntal-strategy/
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 02:25 PM   #26824
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Democracies therefore what? Democracies haven’t done the same things?
When Belgians created the colonial law that in case of outbreaks the houses of the sick had to be burned as well as all surrounding houses, Belgium was a constitutional monarchy. In case of a White person the house wasn't to be burned, all insects had to be removed from the house, just that (pseudoscience as well).

The fact Belgium was a constitutional monarchy didn't stop them from treating us like subhumans.
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 02:29 PM   #26825
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Democracies therefore what? Democracies haven’t done the same things?
Are you going to compare 19th century UK with now's China? I don't care about what this or that did in the 15th century, that was my 15th century ancestor problem...I care about what's going on here and now, and what I can do about it.
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 02:32 PM   #26826
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When Belgians created the colonial law that in case of outbreaks the houses of the sick had to be burned as well as all surrounding houses, Belgium was a constitutional monarchy. In case of a White person the house wasn't to be burned, all insects had to be removed from the house, just that (pseudoscience as well).

The fact Belgium was a constitutional monarchy didn't stop them from treating us like subhumans.
Does anything that Europe did in the past justify that others could do it now?

Weirdest reasoning ever...only in Africa.
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 04:38 PM   #26827
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The size of the Tangier Med I and II Ports (The largest in Africa in TEUs and the Largest in the Mediterranian in terms of capacity )

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Old August 22nd, 2019, 04:48 PM   #26828
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Are you going to compare 19th century UK with now's China? I don't care about what this or that did in the 15th century, that was my 15th century ancestor problem...I care about what's going on here and now, and what I can do about it.
why go that far back. US routinely killed and jailed protesters during the civil rights movement so instance. extrajudicially. heavy handed responses to perceived existential threats are the norm for every form of government.

i like democracy mainly for transition because its absence builds a lot of tension in the system that when the leader leaves things fall apart. but where they can transition well, or rotate leaders, the system can offer as much as democracy. but both system are amoral when faced with a threat
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 04:52 PM   #26829
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Does anything that Europe did in the past justify that others could do it now?

Weirdest reasoning ever...only in Africa.
if you dont hold them liable for the past, cant china of today simply say that in 100 years Genbank will wave off their "atrocities" today as being the stuff of history. if so why not just commit the acts, since time renders you innocent
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 05:31 PM   #26830
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Tony Leon: SA's lessons from Argentinian economic crisis

Argentina’s economy is in a state of economic paralysis.

The country is currently suffering a recession and an inflation rate of 55%, and the Peso currency took a plunge on Monday ahead of a re-election bid.

Some say the crisis could be a warning for South Africa.

Former Democratic Alliance leader and ambassador to Argentina highlights lessons that can be learned in the South African context.

He joins Bongani Bingwa to discuss what we can learn.

Leon lived in Argentina for three years until 2012 as South African ambassador.

"I kept being struck by the extraordinary similarities between our countries."

He says in the 1930s Argentina was the seventh richest countries in the world, and currently, it's economy is smaller than South Africa.

Mauricio Macri is the current president of Argentina and has been in office since 2015 but his reign may be coming to an end.

Centre-left candidate Alberto Fernandez won the presidential primaries in Argentina this past Sunday show those proposing radical economic transformation "are on the comeback trail", says Leon.

"And the markets reacted violently to that on Monday...and it could mean Argentian is in for more hard times ahead."

"Argentina is the poster boy for the lack of success with IMF bailouts. I think they have had ten or eleven...and it's always ended badly."

"The biggest problem in Argentina is inflation whereas we have a very sober Reserve Bank and inflation here is well under control....in Argentina the resort to printing money has been almost irresistible."

South Africa is not yet in that position, but things can accelerate or deaccelerate very quickly, he warns.

http://www.702.co.za/articles/357809...conomic-crisis
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 06:01 PM   #26831
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Mali's new mining code ends tax exemptions, other protections

BAMAKO, Aug 21 (Reuters) - Mining companies operating in Mali will no longer be exempt from VAT during production and will have a shorter period of protection from fiscal changes, according to a new mining code announced by the Mines Ministry on Wednesday.

The new code seeks to redress the “shortcomings” of a 2012 law by bringing a “substantial increase” in the contribution of the mining sector to the economy, the Mines Ministry said in a statement.

But it contains some clauses that international mining companies have strongly opposed elsewhere in Africa, most notably in the Democratic Republic of Congo where companies have been at loggerheads with government.

The new code in Mali, Africa’s third largest gold producer, shortens the “stability period” during which mining companies’ existing investments are protected from changes to fiscal and customs regimes.

Under the previous law, the stability clause was 30 years. It was not made clear on Wednesday what the length of the new stability period would be, but the Economy Ministry said last year that the government aimed to reduce those protections to the lifespan of a mine.

Mali’s government had been negotiating with mining companies to draft a new mining code, but it said last year that it would move to implement a new law unilaterally if no compromise was reached.

It was not clear on Wednesday whether the new code was the product of compromise or if it was proposed without consultation.

Companies with stakes in industrial gold mines in Mali include Barrick Gold Corp, AngloGold Ashanti, B2Gold and Hummingbird Resources.

https://www.reuters.com/article/mali...-idUSL5N25H5XY
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 06:02 PM   #26832
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekema View Post
why go that far back. US routinely killed and jailed protesters during the civil rights movement so instance. extrajudicially. heavy handed responses to perceived existential threats are the norm for every form of government.

i like democracy mainly for transition because its absence builds a lot of tension in the system that when the leader leaves things fall apart. but where they can transition well, or rotate leaders, the system can offer as much as democracy. but both system are amoral when faced with a threat
The civil rights movement happened many decades ago... another generation, and other customs, compare them with their Chinese contemporaries (Tiananmen, Tibet...).

Both systems are amoral??? Gosh what did we miss in Africans' education to generate such slaves mentality...
After expelling our former european masters, we seem to have developped a Stokholm syndrome that require local masters to continue the enslavement... Are you able to think by yourself? trust your fellow citizens? or will you need some sort of a master to tell you what to do until the end of times?

When you compare countries with similar cultures, the democratic version almost always beat the autocratic form, because democracies have good institutions, an independant justice system, human rights, free economies with fair competition... a dictator will always need corruption, a predatory class and a biased justice to survive.

India vs Pakistan
China vs Taiwan (or Korea)
Senegal vs Mauritania
...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ekema View Post
if you dont hold them liable for the past, cant china of today simply say that in 100 years Genbank will wave off their "atrocities" today as being the stuff of history. if so why not just commit the acts, since time renders you innocent
My brain just exploded...

Last edited by Genbank; August 22nd, 2019 at 06:09 PM.
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 06:38 PM   #26833
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Quote:
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The civil rights movement happened many decades ago... another generation, and other customs, compare them with their Chinese contemporaries (Tiananmen, Tibet...).

Both systems are amoral??? Gosh what did we miss in Africans' education to generate such slaves mentality...
After expelling our former european masters, we seem to have developped a Stokholm syndrome that require local masters to continue the enslavement... Are you able to think by yourself? trust your fellow citizens? or will you need some sort of a master to tell you what to do until the end of times?

When you compare countries with similar cultures, the democratic version almost always beat the autocratic form, because democracies have good institutions, an independant justice system, human rights, free economies with fair competition...

India vs Pakistan
China vs Taiwan (or Korea)
Senegal vs Mauritania
...



My brain just exploded...
Emmitt Till would be in his 70s. it wasnt that long ago.

but my point with time is every one tries to use time as an excuse, even though they were well aware their actions were bad at the time. if you're going to give a pass to the evils done by democratic regimes merely because it was a few decades ago, then any wrongdoing will simply rely on getting away with the act, since in time everyone will just wave it off.

how does pointing out that both systems are amoral when faced with a threat equal stockhold syndrome. would'nt that be the opposite. anyway when it comes to challenges to the system, and existential threats, even internal ones, they both respond cruelly. only difference is the democratic system apologizes years later.
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 06:41 PM   #26834
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Fourways Mall finally launches, becomes the largest shopping centre in South Africa



After missing several deadlines, the newly redeveloped multi-billion Fourways Mall has finally opened its doors, becoming the largest shopping centre in South Africa.

The mall which has double in size, was supposed to open at the end of April but the owners, JSE-listed Accelerate Property decided its new sections will trade starting from 22 August — with the official celebration launch set for next week on the 29th.

Despite depressed consumer spending, developers are bringing more shopping malls to an already saturated market.

At 178,000m², from 85,000m², the Fourways Mall is now larger than Pretoria's Menlyn Park at 169,000m², Sandton City, the 131,000m² Mall of Africa in Waterfall and the 166,636m² Gateway Theatre of Shopping in Durban.

The mall now has more than 250 new brands and stores added to the retail mix, offering a staggering total of 450 shops.







http://www.sacommercialpropnews.co.z...in-africa.html
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 06:53 PM   #26835
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicSA View Post
Fourways Mall finally launches, becomes the largest shopping centre in South Africa



After missing several deadlines, the newly redeveloped multi-billion Fourways Mall has finally opened its doors, becoming the largest shopping centre in South Africa.

The mall which has double in size, was supposed to open at the end of April but the owners, JSE-listed Accelerate Property decided its new sections will trade starting from 22 August — with the official celebration launch set for next week on the 29th.

Despite depressed consumer spending, developers are bringing more shopping malls to an already saturated market.

At 178,000m², from 85,000m², the Fourways Mall is now larger than Pretoria's Menlyn Park at 169,000m², Sandton City, the 131,000m² Mall of Africa in Waterfall and the 166,636m² Gateway Theatre of Shopping in Durban.

The mall now has more than 250 new brands and stores added to the retail mix, offering a staggering total of 450 shops.







http://www.sacommercialpropnews.co.z...in-africa.html
South african's do love a good mall the SA ones are better than all the European countries I have visited. Capetown is the only odd one out it has european style shops/malls
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 06:59 PM   #26836
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From America to Accra: Tani Sanchez and her daughter Tani Sylvester represent a growing number of African Americans on a heritage tour to explore their ancestral roots in Ghana.



https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a...-idUSKCN1VC16H
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 11:01 PM   #26837
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1/10 Following the energy forum in Matadi this week, some thoughts on how DRC can electrify its population. The conventional grid cannot keep up with population growth - new ideas are needed.

2/10 Congo has a fast growing population. Just to keep electrification rate constant it needs to add 400,000 connections per year. This is not happening today. Figures vary but the rate of access is around 9% and falling.

3/10 Grid is slow and expensive. The average grid project takes 9 years and the average cost per connection on the continent is $2,500. Building the lines to connect households is incredibly expensive and responsible for a large part of the cost. https://greentechmedia.com/articles/...ties#gs.r4y5gm

4/10 At the same time the average household in DRC uses very little electricity. Monthly revenues from average households connected to grid are $2-5 pm. Most households use electricity to charge phones and light their houses. Wealthier households power TVs. Consumption is low.

5/10 At $2,500 per connection the economics of grid to connect households are not pretty. Payback is 50-100 years. As a result, most operators will not electrify households without big grants. Most grid projects underway in DRC are targeting industry and will not reach households

6/10 Pay-go solar can be used to electrify households at a fraction of the cost and at 10x the speed. In fact, pay-go solar is likely the ONLY solution that can keep up with the speed of population growth in DRC and improve the rate of energy access. Remember 400,000 connections.

7/10 Small amounts of support can rapidly accelerate uptake of pay-go solar. With $15M the entire city of Goma could be electrified in 2 years with an end-customer price of $2 per month. Togo is leading the way here.

8/10 Any electrification strategy for Congo needs to separate between two aims: economic growth and improving livelihoods for average households. Grid and solar are complementary and each contribute to a different part of this strategy.

9/10 The most efficient way to unlock growth is to build a grid 'backbone' along main roads in the cities and in industrial zones where industry can set-up. Grid is expensive and it should be built where it will have biggest impact. It does not need to be built everywhere.

10/10 Pay-go solar should then be used to make electricity accessible to the population and improve livelihoods. Projects such as those pioneered by Togo should be implemented here to bring the cost down for consumers and accelerate access by an order of magnitude.

... it is totally possible to get electricity to EVERY household in DRC in the next 30 years but it will need a clear strategy from the government and support from multinational organisations helping with its energy strategy to make it happen



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Old August 23rd, 2019, 01:40 AM   #26838
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Gabon Suspends Judge Who Granted Hearing on President’s Fitness

Gabon suspended an appeal court judge who scheduled a hearing on a petition that President Ali Bongo should undergo medical tests to determine whether he’s fit to rule.

Judge Paulette Ayo Mba has been suspended until Sept. 30 without pay for “refusing to respect a decision” issued July 26 by a head judge, the Ministry of Justice said in a statement, without elaborating further on the charge. Earlier this month, Mba granted the hearing at the request of opposition supporters, whose bid for an independent medical exam of Bongo’s physical and mental health was dismissed by a trial court in May.

Bongo, 60, returned to Gabon in March after spending more than five months abroad to recover from a stroke he suffered when attending a conference in Saudi Arabia. He has ruled OPEC’s second-smallest oil producer since winning elections in 2009 that were held months after his father, Omar Bongo, died in office.



https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...content=africa
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Old August 23rd, 2019, 04:32 AM   #26839
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From America to Accra: Tani Sanchez and her daughter Tani Sylvester represent a growing number of African Americans on a heritage tour to explore their ancestral roots in Ghana.







https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a...-idUSKCN1VC16H


Im not interested.

What I want is successful AAs coming and investing like Jews do in Israel and Lebanese do in Lebanon.
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Old August 23rd, 2019, 04:40 AM   #26840
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Umoja View Post
1/10 Following the energy forum in Matadi this week, some thoughts on how DRC can electrify its population. The conventional grid cannot keep up with population growth - new ideas are needed.



2/10 Congo has a fast growing population. Just to keep electrification rate constant it needs to add 400,000 connections per year. This is not happening today. Figures vary but the rate of access is around 9% and falling.



3/10 Grid is slow and expensive. The average grid project takes 9 years and the average cost per connection on the continent is $2,500. Building the lines to connect households is incredibly expensive and responsible for a large part of the cost. https://greentechmedia.com/articles/...ties#gs.r4y5gm



4/10 At the same time the average household in DRC uses very little electricity. Monthly revenues from average households connected to grid are $2-5 pm. Most households use electricity to charge phones and light their houses. Wealthier households power TVs. Consumption is low.



5/10 At $2,500 per connection the economics of grid to connect households are not pretty. Payback is 50-100 years. As a result, most operators will not electrify households without big grants. Most grid projects underway in DRC are targeting industry and will not reach households



6/10 Pay-go solar can be used to electrify households at a fraction of the cost and at 10x the speed. In fact, pay-go solar is likely the ONLY solution that can keep up with the speed of population growth in DRC and improve the rate of energy access. Remember 400,000 connections.



7/10 Small amounts of support can rapidly accelerate uptake of pay-go solar. With $15M the entire city of Goma could be electrified in 2 years with an end-customer price of $2 per month. Togo is leading the way here.



8/10 Any electrification strategy for Congo needs to separate between two aims: economic growth and improving livelihoods for average households. Grid and solar are complementary and each contribute to a different part of this strategy.



9/10 The most efficient way to unlock growth is to build a grid 'backbone' along main roads in the cities and in industrial zones where industry can set-up. Grid is expensive and it should be built where it will have biggest impact. It does not need to be built everywhere.



10/10 Pay-go solar should then be used to make electricity accessible to the population and improve livelihoods. Projects such as those pioneered by Togo should be implemented here to bring the cost down for consumers and accelerate access by an order of magnitude.



... it is totally possible to get electricity to EVERY household in DRC in the next 30 years but it will need a clear strategy from the government and support from multinational organisations helping with its energy strategy to make it happen









No 9


I have been saying this for years. The true benefit of extending power to small hamlets and villages where they cant even afford the bills. Cost per connection is huge as per No 3.

Theres an obsession with numbers regarding electrification rates but they arent looking at the bigger picture. This is controversial but for me, manufacturing would be the priority.
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