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Old June 8th, 2005, 02:15 AM   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakumoto
Misleading. Most of the south park areas marked "under construction" aren't under construction.
Your statement is still incorrect, most of the south park areas marked "under contstruction" ARE under construction. Just because "grand lofts isnt taking up that whole block next to the transamerica center" doesn't make your statement correct.
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Old June 8th, 2005, 09:24 AM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LosAngelesSportsFan
Actually they are. Everything except for the area next to staples center, which will be under construction in less than 2 months.
Well, if you want to be **** about it, TECHNICALLY, at least 3 of the areas marked under construction aren't CURRENTLY under construction. And if i want to be a real dick about it, the third phase of elleven isn't under construction either.
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Old June 8th, 2005, 10:45 AM   #123
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I guess you are right. Third phase gets underway later this year by the way.
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Old June 8th, 2005, 10:47 AM   #124
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Click the link for renderings

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...ck=pacifictime

Project May Put Blighted Area on a Brighter Path
# A developer's plan for a mixed-use complex in downtown L.A. includes 370 apartments.

By Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer

Downtown's residential expansion is expected to march deeper into historic Los Angeles this fall with construction of a $140-million apartment and retail complex on a Main Street block long considered to be part of skid row.

Developer Medallion Inc. plans to build 370 rental units in two 11-story buildings on top of stores facing Main and Los Angeles streets between 3rd and 4th streets. The apartments are expected to rent for $2 to $2.50 a square foot, in line with other new downtown units, or $1,500 to $1,900 a month for an average 770-square-foot unit.

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The apartments are among the 11,000 units proposed or approved for construction downtown, according to the Downtown Center Business Improvement District. Since 1999, nearly 4,000 apartments and condominiums have been added to the market; an additional 4,500 are under construction. There are about 7,000 market-rate apartments and condos downtown, an increase of 53% since 1998, district staffers say.

New development at the Medallion location will fill in a key piece of the urban landscape, said City Councilwoman Jan Perry, who calls it "one of the gateways to downtown."

Medallion bought the property less than a year ago with the intention of building retail space to serve wholesalers branching out of the nearby toy and garment districts, company President Saeed Farkhondehpour said. But city officials wanted more residential units in the area, he said, so his project is now 70% apartments.

"We want to resurrect Main Street," said city staffer Greg Fischer, who is also a historian.

Consequently, Medallion's ground-floor space on Main will be devoted to shops and restaurants. On Los Angeles Street, Farkhondehpour plans to rent the first level to toy and garment companies that have wholesale and retail operations. There also will be eight-story and four-story parking structures and some underground parking.

The property is across 4th from the Old Bank District, a 230-unit complex in three former office buildings that were built around the turn of the last century and converted to housing in 2000.

The design of the L-shaped Medallion building at 4th and Main will make a stylistic nod to the Old Bank District's San Fernando Building, completed in 1906, said architect Alex Ward. His Omaha-based firm, Leo A Daly, is designing the Medallion complex with M2A, a Los Angeles architecture firm.

The Medallion building at 3rd and Main will have a more contemporary design in what Ward calls "sleek materials," including glass, metal and precast concrete.

"We want to re-create a more traditional urban experience — what you find in all great cities," he said.

The intersection of 4th and Main was once the site of the Westminster Hotel, one of the city's finest. The Victorian-era establishment, built in the 1880s, played host to Presidents William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft. It was razed decades ago.

Main Street also was one of the city's most exclusive residential addresses after the Civil War. Among the homeowners was Cameron E. Thom, mayor from 1882 to 1884, who had a large house and yard that took up a third of the block at 3rd and Main, historian Fischer said.

The area eventually grew disreputable and has long been plagued by homelessness and drug abuse.

However, a boom in residential construction in the last four years, led by developer Tom Gilmore's Old Bank District apartments, has altered the fabric of the historic downtown area. And in April, the Midnight Mission moved from 4th and Los Angeles to 6th and San Pedro streets.

With the mission relocated, development on his property became viable, said Farkhondehpour, adding, "We feel like downtown is definitely changing."

The developer and his partner, Morad Neman, own almost a third of the commercial space in downtown's toy district, Farkhondehpour said. They own more than 1.2 million square feet in that area and the nearby garment district and manage their properties through Investment Consultant Inc.

The new complex will be his and Neman's first residential project, Farkhondehpour said.

Gilmore, who is building condos nearby in the former Hotel El Dorado on Spring Street between 4th and 5th, said the Medallion project would further improve the neighborhood.

"There's nothing worse than walking along a whole block of parking lot," he said.

"A sensitive development that incorporates uses that the neighborhood needs is nothing but good."
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Old June 8th, 2005, 10:54 AM   #125
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sportsfan, you are fast! i just got that article in my email inbox and here you've posted it already! I was just on that block, having dinner at a new restaurant in the neighborhood. I'm glad that my neighborhood is coming along nicely, but the artist rendering for that project just looks so out of place compared to all the other buildings in the vicinity.
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Old June 8th, 2005, 06:34 PM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakumoto
Well, if you want to be **** about it, TECHNICALLY, at least 3 of the areas marked under construction aren't CURRENTLY under construction. And if i want to be a real dick about it, the third phase of elleven isn't under construction either.
Ahh, i get it... you're one of those "smart" guys... dude... phase 3 of southgroup is not "planned or proposed" it is under construction. And if you really want to be the real dick about it, its not called the third phase of elleven... elleven is the first phase, luma is the second phase and the third phase isn't named yet!!!
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Old June 10th, 2005, 01:01 AM   #127
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^Vicecity, here's the real status of the South Group, as of 5 minutes ago. I just spoke to their sales center:

Phase 1: Elleven - Under construction (expected completion Apr 06)
Phase 2: Luma - Approved, not under construction. Pre-sales begin at end of July.
Phase 3: Evo - working name, currently at 23 stories, should be publicly announced in a few months.
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Old June 10th, 2005, 01:34 AM   #128
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from a sales center's perspective... it is not technically under construction, but as soon as you order cranes to the construction site... its under construction.
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Old June 11th, 2005, 01:12 AM   #129
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I drove by the site last night. There is one crane on the site, operating on Elleven. Phase two is not under construction. The construction trailers and construction materials for phase 1 are sitting on the footprint where phase two will go.

Also, in the world of for sale condominiums, it is extremely rare or possibly unheard of for construction to start before pre-sales have started. Pre-sales for Luma begin in July. The tower is not, under any definition, under construction. Should be soon, though, if pre-sales go well.
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Old June 11th, 2005, 01:36 AM   #130
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Vicecity, here's a couple of pictures to illustrate my point:

Here's a model shot of Elleven and Luma, with Elleven on the left. This vantage point is from the corner of 11th and Hope.


Here's a construction pic from last Saturday from almost the same vantage point, but on the ground and zoomed in on Elleven a bit. It's hard to tell from this pic because you can't see through the fence, but the area in the foreground, to the right of the picture, is where Luma will go. Currently, no ground has been broken on that half of the block.


The crane that's there is actually positioned where the podium between the two buildings will go. So, when it comes time to build Luma, they'll either swing that crane around and raise it, or move it further south so that they can construct the entire podium area without having to remove the crane.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 12:59 AM   #131
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Hi! I'm a Spanish guy and I've being checking ur threads. Could I ask u for a favour? Could any of u go to "Foro de rascacielos españoles" and pay a visit to "Extremadura y Region de Murcia" and see "Hilo oficial de las torres de Murcia capital"? I live in Murcia, where the construction of skyscrapers is begining now, and would like to know what u think about theses projects. Thanx!
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Old June 15th, 2005, 01:34 AM   #132
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I updated the first page to reflect LA's new projects!

Last edited by vicecityguy; June 17th, 2005 at 06:26 AM.
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Old June 18th, 2005, 09:11 PM   #133
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Time to add THREE new towers to the list. A project between Figeruoa, flower, 11th and 12th. The towers will be 40, 25, 17 story's, with 125,000 square feet of retail and it will have a Times Square Feel to it. Ill post the article with the snipet as a new post.
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Old June 23rd, 2005, 10:32 PM   #134
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are la live and hilton the same project or different
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Old June 23rd, 2005, 10:47 PM   #135
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^Same.
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Old June 24th, 2005, 09:34 PM   #136
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The Hilton is the 50 story hotel/condo. There will also be clubs, a theatre, stores, restraunts, and of course Staples. All of which make up LA Live.
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Old July 9th, 2005, 03:07 AM   #137
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Zen' Tower Could Dominate Historic Core

Kawada Group Plans 50-Story, 300-Condo Structure Near Grand Central Market

by Kathryn Maese

A 50-story residential high-rise, 20 floors higher than the Transamerica Building and nearly as tall as the Wells Fargo Tower, is being planned at the northeast corner of Third and Hill streets.
This parking lot at Third and Hill streets could feature one of the tallest residential towers in Downtown, creating more than 300 condos in a slender high-rise overlooking the Historic Core and the Civic Center. Photo by Gary Leonard.

The Kawada Company of America, which also owns the Kawada Hotel on the northern end of the same block, is in the conceptual design phase for the 302-unit condo tower and 10,000 square feet of retail. If built, it would become a dominant landmark on the Downtown Los Angeles skyline and would further the rush of high-rises expected to be part of the Grand Avenue plan.

The Kawada group will seek city entitlements in the coming months, and has hired Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Design as the architect of the Asian-inspired project dubbed "Zen." Construction is anticipated to last 18 months.

"It is near the historic Broadway core so we certainly will have a style that's compatible, but we will not mimic a historic theme," said John Bowman, a land use attorney for the project. "As it is proposed, it would include a podium level with a taller, slender tower on top of that."

The immediate area around the proposed project has become a mini residential hub wedged between the Civic Center and the Historic Core. Nearby projects that are open or under construction include the Pan American Lofts, Grand Central Square apartments, the 50-unit Douglas Building and the 135-unit Higgins Building. The Victor Clothing Lofts is in the planning stages.

The 26,400-square-foot site of the future development is currently used as a Joe's Parking Lot and neighbors Grand Central Market and the senior housing complex Angelus Plaza. The project is being touted by Kawada as the first new mixed-use high-rise in the district.

Bowman said the podium level would include a ground-floor sports-themed restaurant and lounge, and an upscale mini-market, amenities lacking in an area surrounded largely by office buildings that shut down after 5 p.m. He would not reveal a proposed price for the project.

A 576-space parking garage would rise on seven floors above the podium, and would be topped by a two-story, 50,000-square-foot fitness center and indoor pool. According to the design, the developer is offering a heliport and signage rights on the building for a major advertiser.

In keeping with the Zen theme, each condo will feature a private garden or sunroom. A large roof garden will overlook the Downtown skyline. Pricing has yet to be determined for the units, which will range from 500 square feet to 1,800 square feet. Each of the four penthouses will span 2,300 square feet. High-end Sub-Zero and Wolfe appliances will be standard in every unit.

Bowman said the Kawada Company held a community meeting last month allowing local stakeholders to view the tower's early design and comment on the project.

"We got good feedback from the public and are moving forward with getting entitled," Bowman said. "We had quite a cross section with people in the development community, Angelus Plaza senior complex, people from the city and other agencies. They seemed to be favorably impressed by the project."

For one neighbor, however, the Zen could leave a less than peaceful impression. Urban Pacific Builders' 40-unit Pan American Lofts at 249 S. Broadway - which are scheduled to open early next year - bumps up against the future site, and would essentially lose its skyline views if the tower is built. The developer of the $16 million condo project did not return calls for comment.

Zen would not be the first new housing development to go high-rise. At least a dozen condo towers are in the works or planning stages throughout Downtown, including several in South Park near the Staples Center. Just two blocks away from the proposed Zen site, New York-based Related Companies is planning three condo and apartment towers with a total of 1,000 units along Grand Avenue and Olive Street as part of the $1.8 billion Grand Avenue plan. The latter high-rises would range from 22 to 45 stories.

"Certainly the fact that [Zen] is near those uses is a plus," Bowman said. "I would add that we've got excellent access to transit, the Red Line and it's also in close proximity to the Civic Center, the federal courthouse, and the various cultural attractions."

Though Kawada has other real estate holdings in Japan, this would mark the company's first residential venture in the U.S.
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Old July 10th, 2005, 09:47 PM   #138
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I updated the first page to include the Zen Tower
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Old August 8th, 2005, 08:08 PM   #139
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Downtown Housing Demand Feeds a Bloom in High-Rises
By Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer

Downtown Los Angeles — which hasn't seen a skyscraper built since Tom Bradley was mayor and the Raiders were playing at the Coliseum — is in the midst of a growth spurt that promises to significantly alter its skyline in the coming years.

The building boom marks the fourth time since World War II that a spate of construction has altered the downtown landscape. But although previous booms focused on commercial space, this one is different: The vast majority of the new high-rise space is for housing.

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The phenomenon mirrors patterns in Chicago, Las Vegas, San Diego and Miami, where residential towers are going up at a rapid clip. Architect Santiago Calatrava recently announced plans to construct the nation's tallest building, a 2,000-foot residential and hotel tower called the Fordham Spire, in Chicago.

From 1986 to 1992, almost two-thirds of towers 20 stories or more built in the U.S. were for office use, according to McGraw-Hill Construction, which tracks projects nationwide. But recently, said McGraw-Hill economist Jennifer Coskren, "this has really flipped."

Between 2003 and June 2005, about 84% of new towers were for residential, multifamily use — an indication, said Coskren, of "this investor and consumer appetite for multifamily condo development. Luxury high-rises are what's being demanded."

The return to tall towers will be a marked change for downtown Los Angeles, whose last new skyscraper was the 750-foot, 52-story Two California Plaza, completed in 1992.

At the south end of downtown, two residential towers already under construction near Staples Center will be joined by a 55-story hotel and condominium complex scheduled to break ground later this year.

To the north, near Walt Disney Concert Hall, at least five skyscrapers are slated for construction as part of the Grand Avenue project, including a 40- to 50-story building to be designed by architect Frank Gehry and scheduled for completion in 2009.

The changing skyline should begin to take shape in the next three years, when the first five buildings that have already won city approval are completed. They include a 33-story loft building at 9th and Flower streets.

In all, 32 towers are on the horizon for downtown, though some still need city approval as well as financing.

Twenty are considered skyscrapers because they climb more than 240 feet, or about 20 stories. One of the most talked about is a proposed 50-story Asian-inspired tower at 3rd and Hill streets.

Together, said author and historian D.J. Waldie, they represent "an enormous transformation of the city we know to something unknown."

Most of the new residential spaces that have opened so far have been quickly swept up by buyers and renters.

But there are lingering concerns that the downtown residential market could suffer the same fate as office space did in the early 1990s, when far more new buildings went up than were needed. Rents plummeted, buildings sat vacant — and it took a decade for downtown to recover.

Some also question whether downtown's sometimes narrow streets and limited infrastructure — everything from its lack of parks to its aging sewer system — can accommodate all the new towers and residents who will follow.

Waldie says he thinks city planners are "failing to connect the dots."

"They're allowing a neighborhood texture to arrive where one had been lost for 50 years," said the author of "Where We Are Now: Notes From Los Angeles." "They're putting in even taller high-rises … but down on the ground, where are the resources to make that into a place to live?"

The new construction could also push out the underclass that has long called downtown home.

Orlando Ward of the Midnight Mission said he was optimistic that the influx of residents would ultimately help the area, but he thinks it could be a rough transition.

He's particularly worried that new residents expecting an urban wonderland will instead find social problems like homelessness and crime.

"There are certain streets you can't go down or won't go down," Ward said. "That's bound to cause resentment or potential backlash…. We're most concerned that there isn't a knee-jerk reaction by policymakers to Band-Aid or push the problem out of sight of our affluent neighbors."



Downtown Los Angeles has seen several distinct flurries of tower development since City Hall, at 28 stories, became the city's first high-rise in 1927. It wasn't until the late 1960s and early 1970s, however, that the city began to have true skyscrapers, such as the 68-story building now called the Aon Center, completed in 1974.

During the last major construction boom downtown, from 1988 to 1992, investors poured billions of dollars into the area. Eight million square feet of office space was added —enough to fill Century City.

The city's tallest building, the 1,018-foot structure now called the US Bank Tower, was finished in 1990. But demand for office space dwindled, and companies that had long had a foothold in downtown, including Security Pacific and Bank of America, fell victim to corporate restructuring. Commercial real estate prices dropped nationwide. And even as new buildings went up, downtown property values plunged. Buildings sat vacant. Landlords lost money on their rents.

When the commercial real estate market began to recover in the mid-1990s, tall buildings sprang up in other parts of the city, especially Century City and other Westside areas. But downtown building activity remained dormant — until now. The recent rebound is due in large part to a renewed interest in downtown living that comes amid a hot housing market.

While vacancies for office space downtown remain at 15.9%, higher than the national average, there are waiting lists for many downtown lofts and condos.

The area's population has risen from an estimated 18,652 residents in 1998 to about 24,600 today, according to estimates from the Los Angeles Downtown Business Improvement District. And based on developments in the pipeline or under construction, that number could double in the next decade.

Engineering and seismic considerations often make building skyscrapers a financial gamble, said Bill Witte, president of Related Cos. of California, which is developing 25 acres downtown — including a number of skyscrapers — on behalf of the city and county as part of the Grand Avenue project, as well as two 15-story structures in Little Tokyo.

Buildings more than 240 feet high require different seismic reinforcements, Witte said, and cost dramatically more.

"Even we had to think long and hard about whether to do something at that height," he said. "You have to believe that you can sell or rent for enough to justify that cost."

But as housing prices continue to climb, and buyers swoop up high-rise living spaces like those being created in former downtown office towers, building bigger and taller structures has become less of a financial risk for developers and the financial institutions that back them.

"The most vigorous market for new buildings is residential," said Carol Willis, founder and director of the Skyscraper Museum in New York City. "And that's just because the prices are phenomenally high. It's more profitable, and it reverses the historical trend" that most tall structures should be office buildings, she said.



While 32 buildings between 11 and 55 stories have been proposed downtown, experts question the viability of some of the grander designs.

Still, city officials and developers expect at least half to be completed by the end of the decade, barring a major shift in the economy.

Even in 2010, the 73-story US Bank Tower, formerly known as the Library Tower, would remain the skyline's pinnacle. But gone would be the gap that now exists between the Transamerica building to the south and the stretch of tall towers beginning north of 9th Street.

That area, called South Park and near Staples Center, is the hub of most of the initial construction, where cranes and crews are already turning former parking lots into high-rises.

This district has far more open space than other parts of downtown, so residents and city planners expect it to be more dramatically transformed. It is also where many amenities for downtown residents will open in coming years, including a Ralphs supermarket — set to open late next year — and movie theaters.

To the north, downtown will see the completion of Bunker Hill's decades-long transformation from a slightly seedy residential quarter into a zone full of high-rises.

Because almost all of the new construction will be residential rather than commercial, the look of the towers will be different from the rest of the skyline.

Expect thinner, more angular structures.

Office buildings, said urban planner Doug Suisman, who consulted on the Grand Avenue project, often look like boxy slabs, in part because of the nature of what happens inside. While residential towers require significantly more plumbing, for example, and higher ceilings than office space, they also need less ventilation and fewer elevators.

In places like Vancouver, Canada, where high-rise residential towers have proliferated in recent years, buildings are "less bulky and more pleasing…. They tend to read more as true towers rather than walls," said Suisman, whose firm, Suisman Urban Design, is based in Santa Monica.

In addition, he said, the buildings are staggered in their placement along the street so not all of them hug the sidewalks. This allows views — or slivers of views — from other points in the downtown to be preserved.

"That valuable commodity, the view, is distributed and fairly shared…. You see this pretty clearly when you are there," he said.

It's unclear whether some precious views, often a selling point for pricey condos, will be preserved as downtown's new towers spring to life. With the wall of downtown buildings being extended north and south, it seems certain, however, that the new projects will further obscure City Hall and shorter landmarks like Disney Hall.

Councilman Tom LaBonge, long a fan of City Hall's iconic placement in the landscape, said he felt that the building "will always stand tall."

But, he admitted, "it has already been dwarfed."

"I don't mind," he said, "as long as the postcards show the city from the east to the west, and show off that great big beacon."
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Old August 17th, 2005, 08:43 PM   #140
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any new pics or renderings?
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