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Old December 4th, 2008, 04:21 PM   #81
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I live in the land of the rain, so no problems with water shortages here.
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Old December 5th, 2008, 06:47 PM   #82
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Israel Facing Worst Water Crisis in More Than 100 Years

The Sea of Galilee, Israel’s largest fresh water source, is drying up.

Four consecutive years of drought, increased consumption stemming from population growth, and what some are calling mismanagement have contributed to the worst water crisis in Israel’s history.

Israel’s three main water sources – the Sea of Galilee and the mountain and coastal aquifers – are almost empty, Uri Schor, spokesman for Israel’s Water Authority,
told CNSNews.com.

The Sea of Galilee alone is nearly 18 feet below its full level. “This is the worst crisis there ever was [since measurements were taken],” Schor said.

The crisis may be particularly acute next summer, if this winter doesn’t bring a lot of rain. Israel’s rainfall comes only during the winter months. The rest of the year is dry.

Israel is now trying to cut down on water demand, Schor said. The Water Authority has launched an advertising campaign urging Israelis to conserve water, and it already has cut potable water supplies to agriculture.

A large part of the water used by agriculture is recycled wastewater, Shaul Arlosoroff, a water resources management consultant, told CNSNews.com.

In fact, Israel is renowned for its water recycling expertise. On Monday, Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm signed a water technologies partnership agreement with Israel, making Michigan the first U.S. state to do so.

The joint declaration establishes a working group between the two states to focus on “energy efficiency and innovative technology” that will improve water quality and increase water re-use.

“As one-fifth of the Earth’s freshwater supply, the Great Lakes are a world-class natural resource and an essential part of our economic transformation,” said Michigan Lieutenant Governor John D. Cherry, Jr., immediate past chairman of the Great Lakes Commission.

“Partnering with Israel on technologies to protect and preserve our water will help not only to ensure that we are good stewards of this resource but will also help to create jobs here in Michigan.”

Desalination

Critics say Israel’s water supply has been mismanaged. They say the government should have built more desalination plants years ago.

Israel has two large water desalination plants, and a third is expected to come online next year. Several more plants are planned. By 2020, Israel should be able to desalinate some 750 million cubic meters annually – the amount currently used by the Israeli public.

Schor argues that if Israel had sunk the money into desalination plants years ago, and there would not have been a shortfall in rain causing drought, the Israeli public might have complained that the money should have gone to other projects.

The water shortage is not unique to Israel. Jordan’s problem is said to be even worse, and the Palestinians are demanding that Israel give them more water.

Israel gives the Palestinians a fixed quota of water, regardless of population growth. The Palestinians are allotted about one-quarter to one-fifth of what Israelis use, said Dr. Marwan Haddad from the College of Engineering at An-Najah University in the West Bank city of Nablus.

Palestinians are not allowed to drill wells or develop water-related projects unless they get permission from Israel, Haddad told CNSNews.com.

Haddad complained that Israel has settled hundreds of thousands of Jewish people in the West Bank. While they have continuous water supply, Palestinian cities receive water only three to four hours a week, and must store it in large tanks on rooftops, he said.

Arlosoroff said that water consumption around the world is directly linked to the GDP. So Palestinians with an annual GDP of $1,000 per capita cannot expect to use what Israelis use at $27,000 per capita.

The issue of water here is so critical that it features in peace agreements.

Israel agreed to give a certain amount of water to Jordan annually as part of the 1994 Israeli-Jordanian peace treaty. Water is one of six final status issues on the Israeli-Palestinian peace process agenda along with Jerusalem, Palestinian refugees, security, Israeli settlements and borders.

Arlosoroff believes the water dispute, although complicated, could be easier to solve than any of the other final status issues.

International organizations that give aid to the Palestinians have helped to alleviate some of the problems.

The U.S. Agency for International Development inaugurated a $45 million water supply project in Hebron last month, which was intended to significantly improve the quality and distribution of drinking water to about 550,000 Palestinians in the southern West Bank.

According to USAID’s Web site, it has provided $734 million to the Water Resources and Infrastructure activities of the Palestinians since 1993. They are working to rehabilitate deteriorated water networks, replace old water pumps, and repair badly deteriorated sewage systems.

In many places, raw sewage has been discharged directly into dry riverbeds causing health problems and contaminating aquifers, USAID says.

According to Schor, Palestinians currently use only potable water for all of their agriculture. If they could recycle their wastewater, it would increase their water supply by 30 to 40 percent, he said.

If Israel does not have a rainy winter this year the government will have to ban all lawn-watering, both public and private, next summer. Otherwise, people won’t have water coming out of the tap, Schor said.

In the meantime, he said, the best thing to do is “pray and pray a lot” for a very rainy winter.

http://www.cnsnews.com/public/conten...x?RsrcID=39581
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Old December 5th, 2008, 06:51 PM   #83
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Jordan grapples with water crisis

The 3.5-billion-euro (4.5-billion-dollar) "Peace Canal" is the heart of the government's vision of slaking thirst in a country that is mostly bone-dry desert and one of the 10 driest places in the world.

At present, the country's main conduit is the 110-kilometre (68-mile) King Abdullah Canal, which brings "blue gold" down the valley of the River Jordan from a range of small rivers in the north of the country.

It irrigates around 8,000 farms and provides the capital, Amman, with its key supplies of water.

But five successive years of below-average rainfall have added significantly to the country's water stress, fuelling fears that worse is to come when man-made climate change really bites.

In theory, 250 million cubic metres (8.8 billion cu. feet) of water are earmarked for irrigation from the canal, but this figure has been notional for several years.

"We are one of the poorest countries in the world in water resources. I am worried for the future that we will receive less quantity of water than we have now because of climate change," said Shafig Habash, managing director of the King Abdullah Canal's control centre in Deir Alla.

"The climate is really changing," he told AFP. "We see it and we feel it. I remember, 15 to 20 years ago, the rain was more heavy and the temperatures were less."

UN talks on addressing global warming run from December 1-12 in Poznan, Poland.

The negotiations are a stepping stone towards a new global pact in December 2009 for reducing greenhouse-gas emissions blamed for damaging Earth's delicate climate system.

Scientists say drought is likely to accentuate in countries that are already badly water-stressed, especially the Middle East and the Mediterranean rim.

Jordan is placing its hopes on the Peace Canal, which would stabilise the Dead Sea -- retreating at the rate of a metre (more than three feet) a year -- by taking water from the Red Sea 180 kilometres away.

Although the Dead Sea, the lowest point on Earth, is below the Red Sea, the pipeline would have to cross higher land in order to reach it, which entails a major pumping effort. En route, a desalination plant would remove the salt, providing 850 million cu. m. (29.75 billion cu. ft.) of potable water each year.

The World Bank is carrying out a feasibility study into the scheme. But even before it clears the technical hurdles and seeks to assemble a mountain of funds, the project faces enormous diplomatic problems.

It has to be approved by Israel and the Palestinian territories as well as Jordan, and thus becomes a card in the poker game of Middle East peace.

Environmentalists, too, have their doubts, fearing that an influx of seawater could have a bad impact on the Dead Sea's strange yet fragile ecosystem.

Munqeth Mehyar, president of Friends of the Earth Middle East (FOEME), said a first, key task is to inform local people about water stress, warn them that it is likely to get worse as a result of climate change and advise them of how to curb wastage and grow different crops.

"When we talk about climate change, a single person in Jordan Valley would feel really helpless," he said. "They would ask: 'What can I do if the developed countries are really putting so much CO2 [carbon dioxide] into the atmosphere?'

"We are preparing them to look for crops that use a lot less water, methods for irrigation and methods for reusing the water. All that is in order to prepare them to use less and less water in the future."

Khawla Dalki, a teacher of English at North Shuna, a village in the far north of the Jordan Valley close to the Syrian border, said awareness of Jordan's water problems was making only painful progress.

"I started talking about it about four years ago, but it's very slow in fact," she said.

"If they get some information about how to deal with this problem, they could be a good example for their parents, their families or their neighbours."

http://www.physorg.com/news147082280.html
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Old December 11th, 2008, 10:34 AM   #84
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Euro-Med water conference to hold in Jordan next month

AMMAN, Nov. 12 (Xinhua) -- A much-delayed Euro-Med gathering on water is expected to kick off in Jordan next month after a series of bargaining and dealings, a Jordanian official said on Wednesday.

"It has been agreed in principle to hold the conference in Jordan on Dec. 18," said Jordanian Minister of State for Information Nasser Judeh.

"Problems related to the conference and the postponement have been solved and the Arab League (AL) will take part as an active member," he added.

The Euro-Med Ministerial Conference on Water was originally slated on Oct. 28 at the shores of the Dead Sea. However, it was delayed just two days ahead of its opening due to disputes on the participation of the AL and its membership in "Union for the Mediterranean" (UPM).

Israel was reportedly against AL's presence as the conference falls within the framework of UPM, saying the league would oppose its participation in the UPM.

However, foreign ministers from concerning states struck a deal at a meeting earlier this month in France, deciding that Israel and the AL will take part in the conference side by side.

The AL was granted a full-time seat at the forum and Israel agreed in exchange for one of five deputy secretary-general posts for an initial three-year period.

According to earlier schedule, the two-day conference will seek to lay a broad framework for a long-term regional water strategy and make the first concrete plans in the field.

Participants will also discuss and define the main challenges and difficulties as well as solutions to address the water shortage in countries like Jordan, which is one of the world' s top 10 states deprived of the resources.
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Old December 11th, 2008, 07:25 PM   #85
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 05:34 AM   #86
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Asia's woes in spotlight at World Water Forum
20 March 2009
Agence France Presse

Burgeoning population growth, poor resource management and floods and droughts amplified by climate change hamper efforts by Asian countries to provide clean water and decent sanitation, the World Water Forum heard Friday.

Ministers from major Asian nations, in a side event at the seven-day arena in Istanbul, admitted they faced a major challenge in trying to meet surging demand for freshwater while at the same time conserve it.

Chinese Water Minister Chen Lei said his country's population, the largest in the world, had to grapple with water wealth that was unevenly distributed and sometimes sparse.

The mismatch "gives rise to intensive conflicts between socio-economic development, water resources and the water environment," he said.

The Asia-Pacific occupies 61 percent of the world's population, but its water resources only account for one third of the global total, according to a report issued at the meeting.

Half a billion people in the region still lack safe drinking water and 1.8 billion are without access to basic sanitation. Of the available sources of renewable water, 79 percent is used up by agriculture.

In some of Asia's breadbaskets, such as the Punjab in India and the North China plain, unreplenished extraction is causing water tables to fall by between two and three metres (6.5 to 6.75 feet) per year, while the glaciers in the Himalayas are shrinking faster than in any part of the world.

All this amounts to a grim outlook for farming, food security and access to safe water and sewerage, the report said.

"At its most dire, the region's water circumstances set the scene for tragedies and unfathomable suffering on a daily basis," it warned.

Bangladesh Water Minister Ramesh Chandra Sen said his country faced "daunting challenges."

"Every year, abundance of water during the monsoon causes disasters like floods and river bank erosions, and scarcity of freshwater during the dry season causes salinity ingression, drought," and other problems, he said.

Added to that was contamination of groundwater, drawn from shallow tubewells, by naturally occurring arsenic, he said.

Health experts say as many as 70 million people in India and Bangladesh are exposed to excessive concentrations of arsenic and fluoride. Some experts describe it baldly as the biggest mass poisoning in history.

Indonesia's minister of public works, Djoko Kirmanto, said countries in Southeast Asia were already beginning to be affected by climate change, which was affecting rainfall patterns and harvests.

"Recently, severe water-related disasters, such as floods, droughts, tsunami, rainstorms, landslides, water-borne diseases and epidemic have occurred in high intensity," he said.

Ministers outlined national water programmes, in water supply and conservation and flood control, and promised to work in regional fora to address competition for water supplies.

China's Chen defended his country against accusations of water misuse and pollution.

Greens point to problems of over-extraction of aquifers and river pollution, and say the Three Gorges dam and programmes to divert water towards the dry north of the country could unleash ecological disaster.

"Over the past 30 years, China has sustained a nearly 10 percent annual economic growth rate at a one percent annual growth rate of water use," Chen said.

"By 2020, when an all-round, well-off society becomes a reality in China, the Chinese people will be safely protected from floods, have access to safe and clean drinking water in both urban and rural areas (and) enjoy (a) remarkably improved water environment."

The World Water Forum, wrapping up on Sunday, has drawn around 27,000 experts, policymakers and activists to round tables, seminars and debates on the worsening problems of freshwater.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 05:35 AM   #87
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Water should be basic human right: Council of Europe
20 March 2009
Agence France Presse

Access to water should be recognised as a basic human right, a senior Council of Europe official said Friday ahead of World Water Day.

"A rights-based approach to water would be a very important means for civil society to hold ... governments accountable for ensuring access to an adequate quantity of good quality water as well as sanitation," the head of the parliamentary assembly of the pan-European body, Lluis Maria de Puig, added.

"The challenges to be tackled are numerous: chronic water shortages in the south, floods in the north and problems with water management and quality in central Europe," he said in a statement.

De Puig singled out the fact that Europe was still failing to treat more than half of its urban water pollution.

"Forty-one million people in Europe do not have access to safe drinking water, and 85 million lack access to basic sanitation," he said.

"Proper water governance that offers sustainable access to water and sanitation is not possible without legislation."

De Puig called on his parliamentary colleagues in the 47 member states of the Council of Europe to act as advocates of the right to water and sanitation.

"The right to sufficient quantities of high-quality water that is easily accessible for all population groups needs to be enshrined in our constitutions," he said.

World Water Day is to be marked on Sunday.
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Old March 23rd, 2009, 12:34 AM   #88
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In a few years time, Scotland can be one of the worlds greatest exporters of water. Scotland has too much water for just us.
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Old June 28th, 2009, 06:43 PM   #89
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Diarrhoea near epidemic in Bangladesh heatwave: clinic
27 April 2009
Agence France Presse

Cases of diarrhoea in Dhaka are reaching epidemic levels, a health expert warned Monday, as the Bangladeshi capital faced record temperatures, a severe water shortage and power cuts.

Azharul Islam Khan, a doctor at Bangladesh's biggest diarrhoea hospital, said the clinic was seeing around 800 new patients a day.

"We're treating the highest number of patients in the pre-monsoon season during our 45 years in existence," Khan, of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, said.

"The situation is very grim and reaching epidemic levels in Dhaka and its outskirts. An acute crisis of water and unusually prolonged heat wave are to blame for such a severe outbreak."

Sixteen people have died of diarrhoea-related illnesses and the hospital has treated more than 40,000 patients since the beginning of March, a hospital spokesperson said.

Temperatures in Dhaka reached 42.2 degrees Celsius (108 degrees Fahrenheit) on Sunday, the highest in 14 years, according to weather officials, with no rain forecast for the next week.
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Old June 28th, 2009, 07:38 PM   #90
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Some of the good lakes (such as Lake Chad and the Aral Sea) are drying up because of overuse and it will take forever to refill them, even if canals are constructed.
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Old July 8th, 2009, 06:06 PM   #91
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Overnight downpour no fix for water woes in Mumbai, where city has cut water supply by 30 pct
8 July 2009

MUMBAI, India (AP) - City authorities have cut water supplies to India's financial capital by nearly one-third, despite an overnight downpour Wednesday that caused flooding but failed to replenish Mumbai's dangerously low water levels.

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) cut water to the city by 30 percent on Monday, the steepest rationing in a decade, S.S. Kurlekar, BMC's chief hydraulic engineer, said Wednesday.

"We may increase the cut-off percent because sufficient rain hasn't arrived yet," Kurlekar said, adding that a decision will be made Monday.

The BMC first introduced a cut of 10 percent on June 8, but raised it to 20 percent on June 20 after expected monsoon rains failed to fall.

It has also suspended water supplies to some construction sites and ordered cutbacks to swimming pools, whirlpool baths, gardens and city hotels, the Times of India reported Wednesday.

The delayed onset of India's annual monsoon has reduced water at two of the six lakes that supply water to Mumbai's more than 13 million inhabitants to below drawable levels, the Times of India said.

Local media have reported residents stockpiling water and 18 hour-a-day water cuts in some parts of the city.

"We may have to switch over to tanker water or bore wells. It does add 2 or 3 percent to the cost of construction," said Mohan Date, assistant vice president of projects for the Lodha Group, which is building 28 developments around Mumbai. He said the firm would continue harvesting rainwater at construction sites to help mitigate the supply cuts.

Suresh Rangarajan, a spokesman for the Indian Hotels Company Ltd., which operates four luxury Taj hotels in Mumbai, said the hotels would work with city authorities to deal with the shortages and ensure that guest services aren't interrupted.

The hotels use private as well as city water sources.

The swimming pool at the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower hotel "will not be shut down," he said.

Heavy overnight rains Wednesday did little to mitigate the shortage, but caused flooding in low-lying areas, intense traffic snarls and some school closures. They also temporarily interrupted train and airport traffic in Mumbai, the Press Trust of India reported. Some residents put out large drums to collect rain water to use for washing and bathing.

Colaba, in south Mumbai, recorded 2.9 inches (73.7 millimeters) of rainfall in the 24 hours ending at 8:30 am, but since the June 1 start of monsoon season, cumulative rainfall has been 39 percent -- or 8.7 inches (221.2 millimeters) -- less than normal, according to the Indian Meteorological Department.

For the country as a whole, cumulative rainfall was 43 percent below average since June 1.

That has created potentially serious problems not just for urban residents, but also for India's heavily agricultural economy. The U.S. Agricultural Department attache in New Delhi said India could face a "severe drought" in a report last week.

India is one of the world's largest producers of cotton, rice and sugar, among other crops, and 60 percent of crop land is not irrigated, according to Goldman Sachs.

Weak rainfall could reduce agricultural growth to 1.4 percent annually, half the long-term average, putting downward pressure on India's overall economic growth and threatening a spike in food prices, Goldman Sachs warned last week.
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Old July 9th, 2009, 08:59 AM   #92
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Barcelona always had major major water issues. Last year as a result of a drought made resulted in all reservoirs around the city being at critical levels. Water had to be imported by boat even.

A desalination plant opened this year. It's the largest in Europe an done of the largest in the word.

Fom the GE website:

Spain, one of the most arid European countries, has a long-standing water supply strategy to desalinate and use brackish river water. That effort has just taken a giant step forward as GE and Aigües Ter-Llobregat (ATLL) have announced the opening of one of the world’s largest and most technologically advanced river water desalination plants, near Barcelona.

The plant employs advanced electrodialysis reversal (EDR) technology from GE to tap the Llobregat and to ensure a clean, reliable water supply for Barcelona and the surrounding Catalonia region.

The EDR plant, operated by water utility Aigües Ter-Llobregat in Abrera, treats 220,000 cubic meters/day of water (58 million gallons/day). It runs in conjunction with ATLL’s existing water treatment plant which uses conventional treatment technology. The EDR plant’s output is blended with the output of the conventional plant to produce a combined stream that is adequate for the region’s needs, meets all water quality standards and is cost-effective.
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Old July 11th, 2009, 05:31 AM   #93
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Mumbai considers cloud seeding to make it rain: reports
10 July 2009
Agence France Presse

The civic authorities in India's financial capital Mumbai are considering cloud seeding amid growing water shortages caused by a lack of consistent monsoon rain, media here reported Friday.

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) said it had consulted the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) and a company that conducted a cloud seeding experiment in 1992 for the best time to carry out the process.

The poor monsoon has seen water levels drop markedly at the six lakes that supply Mumbai with 3.3 billion litres (872 million US gallons) of water every day. A 30 percent cut in supplies was introduced this week.

"Over the coming week, we will consult the IMD to work out how to efficiently and effectively carry out the process of cloud seeding," senior BMC official Anil Diggikar was quoted as saying in The Hindustan Times newspaper.

The process involves spraying the chemical compound silver iodide or dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) from an aircraft onto clouds to induce rainfall.

Diggikar ruled out another proposal mooted to alleviate the water shortage, desalination, because of the length of time it would take to set up plants and cost, the domestic Press Trust of India news agency said.

Like many Indian cities, Mumbai depends on the annual monsoon to replenish water stocks. The rains had been due to arrive on June 8 but only hit the city at the end of last month.

Since then, they have been intermittent, raising fears about water supplies and agricultural resources in western Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital.

The IMD said 63.4 millimetres (2.5 inches) of rain fell in the Colaba area of south Mumbai in the 24 hours to 8:30 am (0300 GMT) Friday. Heavy rain is forecast for Friday and Saturday.
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Old July 12th, 2009, 11:17 PM   #94
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Melbourne water supply is at 26.6%.
Restrictions are in force but it doesn't seem to be helping as much, although we have been getting some rain this winter
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Old July 12th, 2009, 11:41 PM   #95
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Here it hasn't rained in such a long time that I don't even remember how rain sounds like, and yet we don't have water shortages, it usually never rains here, we only get about 400 mm of precipitation a year, mostly in sporadic and strong super cell thunderstorms during the Spring and Summer, during the Autumn and Winter it is rare for rain to happen, but if any precipitation does happen it is usually in the form of sleet or snow about once every 5 years.
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Old July 13th, 2009, 05:53 PM   #96
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FACTBOX-Facts on world's water shortage

June 16 (Reuters) - With California in its third year of drought, concern over access to clean water is no longer limited to the developing world.

Here are some facts about global water scarcity, according to the World Health Organization.

* Water scarcity affects one in three people on every continent and is getting worse as water needs rise with population growth, urbanization and increased usage by households and industry.

* Almost one-fifth of the world's population (about 1.2 billion people) lives in areas where water is scarce. One quarter of the population lives in developing countries that face water shortages due to lack of infrastructure.

* Poor water quality can increase the risk of cholera, typhoid fever, dysentery and other infections. Water scarcity can lead to typhus, plague and trachoma, an eye infection that can cause blindness.

* Water scarcity encourages people to store water in their homes, which increases the risk of contamination and provides breeding grounds for mosquitoes, which carry dengue fever, malaria and other diseases.

* A lack of water has increased the use of wastewater for farming. More than 10 percent of the world's people consume foods irrigated by wastewater that may contain chemicals or disease-causing organisms.
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Old July 15th, 2009, 03:42 AM   #97
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Cities with plenty of water:

Rochester
Buffalo
Erie
Cleveland
Toledo
Detroit
Gary
Chicago
Milwaukee
Duluth

So when are you moving to the US Great Lakes?
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Old July 23rd, 2009, 05:58 PM   #98
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Smart tech could save billions of litres of water

LONDON, July 22 (Reuters) - Americans can save some of the 225 billion gallons of water (852 billion litres) wasted each year through over-watering by installing smart systems which deliver just the right amount of moisture.

Homeowners and companies over-water their grass and plants by between 30 and 300 percent, said Chris Spain, chief sustainability officer at water management company HydroPoint, citing a report by the American Water Works Association.

"The reason for the waste is because of dumb technology," Spain said. "There are 45 million irrigation systems in the U.S. (controlled) by simple timers. They do a great job of keeping time but a lousy job of irrigating to what the land requires."

City landscaping, or "urban irrigation", makes up 58 percent of urban water use, Spain said, adding that the water wasted generates over 544,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases annually.

Smart irrigation systems are programmed to optimize water use based on parameters including plant and soil types and amount of sunlight, and also feature weather sensors that monitor soil moisture levels following rainfall.

"U.S. water-related energy use is at least 521 million megawatt hours a year -- equivalent to 13 percent of the nation's electricity consumption," said a River Network Carbon Footprint of Water report published in May.

"The carbon associated with moving, treating and heating water in the U.S. is at least 290 million tonnes a year."

Climate change also affects water levels, with western states experiencing their driest years since records began.

This year marks the third of drought for the most-populous state of California where lawmakers are urging residents to take shorter showers and water lawns less frequently to cut consumption a fifth.

Several studies found that smart irrigation systems command water savings of between 16 and 30 percent over traditional timer-based controllers, which come at a similar cost.

"It's not like solar, lighting or other systems which require vast infrastructure changes," Spain said, adding that his clients have saved $75 million in water cost savings.

Jennifer Riley-Chetwynd of Rain Bird said her company saw a corporate headquarters nearly halve water used for irrigation from 416,000 gallons per year to 214,000 gallons.

Over-watering also pollutes and damages buildings, drawing $375 million in insurance claims in California in 2005, according to the California Insurance Association.

New California legislation makes smart irrigation controllers mandatory for new properties from 2012, Spain added.

BRITAIN

The United States is not alone with concerns over water.

A joint study published on Wednesday by the UK's Energy Saving Trust and the Environment Agency warned that as new homes became more and more energy efficient, hot water use could overtake heating as the main cause of carbon emissions.

"Six percent of the UK's annual carbon emissions are related to water use -- nearly 90 percent of that is from hot water use in the home," the report said.

Britain's Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee also issued a report on Wednesday to water regulator Ofwat warning that water scarcity will become "an increasingly critical issue in the South and East of England" and urging improved water efficiency.
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Old July 23rd, 2009, 09:10 PM   #99
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Makes me glad I live in Canada, even if it has seemed to rain every day this summer.
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Old July 25th, 2009, 06:20 PM   #100
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China says to adjust water pricing to avoid waste

BEIJING, July 23 (Reuters) - China will adjust water pricing because the treatment of sewage is now too cheap and water resources should be used more efficiently, the Chinese central planning agency said on Thursday.

The National Development and Reform Commission said local governments would need to implement the changes gradually and cushion the impact on low-income groups by increasing subsidies.

The prices of water used for industrial and commercial purposes should be unified, it added in a statement on its website. It also encouraged more recycling.

It did not give any specific details about how pricing would be adjusted.

Rapid expansion of cities and factories has put a heavy strain on water resources, and China has been trying to cut usage to alleviate chronic shortages that it fears could undermine its ability to feed itself and crimp economic growth in the long run.
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