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Old March 12th, 2018, 09:35 PM   #121
hkskyline
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Mar 12, 2018
South Africa's Cape Town faces severe economic troubles over drought: Moody's
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JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Rating’s agency Moody’s warned on Monday the water crisis affecting Cape Town would cause the city’s borrowing to rise sharply and the provincial economy to shrink the longer the situation lasted.

A severe drought afflicting South Africa’s Western Cape province is expected to cut agricultural output by 20 percent in 2018, decimating the wheat crop and reducing apple, grape and pear exports to Europe, according to national government.

The City is bracing for “Day Zero” in late August when its taps could run dry.

Moody’s said in a report that one of the most direct impacts would be on Cape Town’s operating revenues, as 10 percent of them are from water charges.

The ratings agency estimates capital expenditure related to water and sanitation infrastructure could be as much as 12.7 billion rand ($1 billion) over the next five years.

“The long-term solutions are likely to require significant capital and operating expenditure,” Daniel Mazibuko, an analyst at Moody’s said.

The drought also threatens to slow South Africa’s economic rebound which has been fueled by a surge in agricultural production. Cape town generated nearly 10 percent of the country’s total gross domestic product in 2016.
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Old May 17th, 2019, 01:31 PM   #122
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FEATURE-As rains fall short, Manila trickles into a water crisis
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MANILA, May 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - On Block 37, the city water supply starts flowing around 7 am. Two or three hours later, it stops.

Evelyn Angeles and her partner make what they can of the window of opportunity, using two taps to fill two 20-litre drums with water to use through the day.

"We can collect enough water to wash our hands, clean our dishes, flush the toilet - and one of us gets to shower," she said, outside her home in Addition Hills, one of Manila's most dangerous and neglected slums.

"It's tough, sure, but it's much worse for people living on other blocks on higher ground," where water pressure is lower, she said, sitting behind a curtain of rubber sandals hanging for sale outside her home.

Since early March, the Manila metropolitan region has been in the grips of a water shortage, as the El Nino phenomenon has contributed to a 60% decline in rainfall, compared the country's long-term average, across half the country's provinces in the first part of the year, according to the government.

In Manila, that has exposed shortfalls and delays in the region's water infrastructure.

At the peak of the shortage in March, supply was 30 percent lower than normal in the city's East Zone, according to Manila Water, the private company responsible for providing water to almost seven million people living in the zone.

While commercial centers and heavily touristed areas were largely unaffected, some of the city's more neglected areas had no running water for seven days or more, the company said.

As the crisis mounted, Manila Water's chief operating officer quit, in mid-April.

Before the month was out, the government hit the firm with a $10 million fine for breach of contract and ordered it to spend $12 million developing a new water source.

Water supply has since been partially restored to 98 percent of customers, for at least eight hours a day - though at low pressure, a spokesman told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Normal service is expected to resume in June, spokesman Mark Orbos said, when seasonal monsoon rains are expected.

For now, however, life in places like Addition Hills revolves around water rationing.

'A WAY OF LIFE'

The water crisis in Metro Manila - a sprawl of 16 adjoined cities populated by about 12.8 million people - is hardly an anomaly.

From South Africa to India, and across North Africa and the Middle East, water scarcity is creating growing stresses as rising wealth and population growth, combined with climate change, place an unsustainable strain on water reserves.

In Asia, 3.4 billion people could be living in "water stressed areas" by 2050, according to a 2016 Asia Development Bank (ADB) report.

"Water shortage should be treated as a permanent ongoing issue," said Thuy Trang Dang, an urban development and water specialist at the ADB's Southeast Asia office.

Global warming, population growth, diets filled with more water-demanding meat and dairy products and general growth in consumption mean "the issue will only become more pressing unless dealt with not as a one-time crisis but as a way of life", she said.

Metro Manila - the Philippines' capital - is already one of the world's most densely populated urban areas.

The number of people living in the East Zone has ballooned from 3 million to almost 7 million since 1997, when Manila Water was awarded a 25-year contract to supply the zone's water.

During that time, the amount of water the firm has been allowed to draw from the Angat dam has remained steady, at 1,600 megaliters per day, Orbos said.

In 2016, demand began surpassing supply, he said.

"Manila Water has strongly advocated for many years for the development of new water sources ... both to ensure sufficiency of water supply as well as resiliency in case of any calamity," the spokesman said.

"However, the development of the new water source is, under the concession agreement, ultimately the responsibilty of MWSS," he added, referring to the Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System.

Ronald Abrigo, a spokesman for the MWSS, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation that the agency has long sought additional sources of water to shore up Manila's supplies.

Constuction began on a series of new dams and treatment plants in 2017, he said, pointing to a study the Manila government used in preparing its 20-year water security plan.

The study warned that "by 2021, supply would be unable to meet demand" in the capital.

More : https://uk.reuters.com/article/phili...-idUKL5N22L391
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Old May 24th, 2019, 03:59 PM   #123
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I have an 'unpopular' and 'horrible' idea for water conservation.

One of the reasons for the shortage of water is water wastage. This is with regard to many developed countries where water is relatively cheap. In spite of education, people still use water without a thought.

The 'unpopular' and 'horrible' idea:
Stop supplying water to homes.
Make people buy water from supermarkets.
What this even more 'unpopular' and 'horrible'. You have to bring your own containers.
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Old May 24th, 2019, 04:46 PM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horlick97 View Post
I have an 'unpopular' and 'horrible' idea for water conservation.

One of the reasons for the shortage of water is water wastage. This is with regard to many developed countries where water is relatively cheap. In spite of education, people still use water without a thought.

The 'unpopular' and 'horrible' idea:
Stop supplying water to homes.
Make people buy water from supermarkets.
What this even more 'unpopular' and 'horrible'. You have to bring your own containers.
That is not an idea, that is back to the middle ages. So if you just want to keep people away from technological advancement, then we could also ride horses to go somewhere, can't we?
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Old June 20th, 2019, 03:05 PM   #125
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Hotels, firms cut back on water use as taps run dry in India's Chennai
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CHENNAI, India, June 19 (Reuters) - Hotels in India's southern city of Chennai are rationing water for guests amid searing heat while companies limit showers as the city of 4.6 million faces its worst shortage in years.

All four reservoirs that supply Chennai, known as the Detroit of south Asia for its flourishing automobile industry, have run dry this summer, largely because of poor monsoon rains last year.

Chennai is one of 21 cities that a government think-tank warned last year could run out of ground water by 2020. This year's monsoon is delayed, further compounding problems across a swath of western and central India.

Employees in Chennai-based companies such as Fiat Chrysler TCS , Wipro and Cognizant said they had been asked to cut back on water use in canteens and restrooms.

U.S-listed Cognizant Technology Solutions (CTS), which employs thousands in the city, said it had cut down on water at its canteen and gym.

"We have also switched to biodegradable plates in all our cafeterias, temporarily closed shower facilities in our gyms, and minimised the washing of utensils in our campuses by our cafeteria vendors," CTS said in a statement.

Water storage levels in the city's four major reservoirs were one-hundredth of what they were this time last year - and at a mere 0.2% of capacity, according to state government data.

Chennai is entirely dependent on the northeast monsoon which begins in October. The last three months of 2018 received lower than average rainfall, with the deficit rising to as much as 80 percent in the month of December, according to India's weather office.

Ananda, a small hotel in southern Chennai, had a notice at its entrance warning of a water shortage.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/us-i...-idUSKCN1TK1IX
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Old June 23rd, 2019, 06:08 AM   #126
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water shortages=bad planning

there is plenty of water out there!
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Old June 26th, 2019, 05:21 AM   #127
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a lot of water necessary for the continuity of our lives... God help those people get...
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Old June 30th, 2019, 05:04 AM   #128
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Parts of southern India facing acute water shortages
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19 June 2019

NEW DELHI (AP) — Millions of people are turning to water tank trucks in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu as house and hotel taps run dry because of an acute water shortage caused by drying lakes and depleted groundwater.

State Rural Development Minister S.P. Velumani said on Wednesday that the drought followed a 62% shortfall in monsoon rains last year compared to 2017.

People are lining up for water cans in the state capital of Chennai.

Some companies have asked employees to work from home. Some restaurants are closing early and even considering not serving lunch if the water scarcity worsens.

Gauri Shankar, general manager of Hotel Deccan Plaza in Chennai, said two tank trucks bring water to the hotel every day from a town 60 kilometers (40 miles) away at a cost of 4,000 rupees ($57) each.

"Even a water tanker is proving difficult to get in the city. We are getting our supply because we entered into a contract with a supplier in September as the water taps started going dry," Shankar said by phone.

Chennai is India's sixth-largest city with an estimated population of 10 million. It is a major destination for medical tourism, and Tamil Nadu state is a car manufacturing hub.

More : https://www.apnews.com/ee71a368a8584a139bb382c7207c5132
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Old June 30th, 2019, 06:58 AM   #129
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Again, bad planning.
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Old July 26th, 2019, 04:18 PM   #130
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FEATURE-Water-smart green roofs and plazas make a splash in Rotterdam
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ROTTERDAM, July 16 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A decade ago, Rotterdam's rundown inner-city Zomerhofkwartier district was slated for redevelopment - a project that was shelved when a global economic crisis hit.

Today, however, the "ZoHo" district is home to young entrepreneurs, a rain garden blooming with flowers, and - like other central neighbourhoods of this Dutch port city - a new sense of green purpose.

Companies, including design firm Studio Bas Sala, teamed up to restore a formerly dilapidated office building in the district as their workspace.

And, across the street, they collaborated with local people to turn a concrete car park into a public garden with meadow-like plants, trees and seating.

The space has a function beyond looking pretty and offering the community a place to gather: it helps prevent flooding in the local area, with the garden acting as a rain sponge.

"There is a problem when the rains are really heavy and the roads around here get blocked, and the emergency services can't come in," said designer Bas Sala.

His studio came up with a funky idea - a water storage system housed in tall black wood lettering spelling out the district's ZoHo nickname.

The letters sit at one end of the park and collect rainwater from a disused 2 km-long rail viaduct snaking above.

When wet weather is on the way or the garden is dry, a pipe at the bottom corner of the letters is opened with an app and water gushes out.

The ZoHo rain garden is one example of a growing number of projects sprouting across Rotterdam - about 80% of which lies below sea-level - that aim to keep communities safer from climate extremes, while bringing them closer together.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/us-n...-idUSKCN1UB1LK
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Old August 19th, 2019, 02:51 PM   #131
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FEATURE-With reservoirs at risk, Sierra Leone capital confronts water crisis
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FREETOWN, Aug 19 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Half the year, Iyatunde Kamara worries torrential rains will wash her house off its hillside and into the rivers of waste that flow through Sierra Leone's capital Freetown.

The other half, she rarely has enough water to fill a pot.

It is a problem faced by nearly everyone in the rundown city of 1.5 million, built at the foot of mountains rising out of the ocean on Africa's western coast.

"Water has always been a struggle," said Kamara, who like her neighbours has no plumbing and fetches water from a stream.

Abundant downpours during the rainy season bring deadly floods every year. In 2017, a mudslide killed more than 1,000 people and left thousands homeless.

Experts largely blamed the disaster on rapid urbanisation driving residents to claim trees and land to build new homes.

But officials and aid workers are increasingly worried about another trend: diminishing water reserves.

Freetown's water comes from reservoirs in the mountains, surrounded by forest. But as trees are cut to make room for construction, rain is draining off the hillsides rather than seeping through their roots into the soil and streams.

"Most of the water collected should be feeding into the dam, but for now it flows out of the area because of deforestation," said water minister Jonathan Tengbe.

"The dam itself is under threat at the moment and there is massive need for us to protect the watershed," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation, referring to the Guma Dam, the biggest in the former British colony.

Taking cues from Nairobi and Cape Town, Freetown plans to set up a water fund in the next year that would pool investment for projects to improve water security, such as planting trees.

But the challenges are massive as the crowded city grows, its proximity to the coast leaving it nowhere to expand but towards the forest.

More : https://uk.reuters.com/article/leone...-idUKL8N2526GI
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