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Old August 4th, 2019, 09:24 PM   #6161
Cherguevara
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Further to the discussion about the economic differences between cities in the North I've found a document that some might find interesting. It's the technical appendix from the Greater Manchester Independent Prosperity Report outlining some work conducted by economist at the University of Cambridge. The specific examples are Greater Manchester only, but I presume something similar could be done for other cities. From the report:

Quote:
The complexity of an economy is related to the breadth and depth of useful knowledge embedded within it. This can for example include the extent to which there are individuals within the economy who know about design, marketing, finance, technology, human resource management, operations and trade law – and whether they can interact and combine their knowledge to make products and services (Hausmann et al., 2014). The economic complexity and diversity (breadth of sectors and occupations within it) of an economy can be an aide to making innovation ‘sticky’, as diverse and dense economies are often better placed to make these types of connections and to find new combinations that may lead to new growth paths and innovative opportunities. Diversification is also closely connected to regional resilience, that is the capacity of a regional or local economy to withstand and recover from shocks.

Pioneering work by the University of Cambridge for this Review has explored
the concept of economic complexity in Greater Manchester, drawing on novel
network-based analysis to study areas of comparative advantage and future
growth potential. The analysis clearly demonstrates that, at a UK and Greater
Manchester level, the level of economic complexity of a district is correlated
with earnings per capita and a significant predictor of future earnings growth. This analysis, undertaken for each Greater Manchester district, uses data on the current industry profile and skills mix, and uses this to identify possibilities to broaden into new specialisms
The exercise is a three stage process. First they looked at which kinds of firms have a tendency to cluster together, for example banking and insurance will tend to agglomerate in the same locations because they share skills and facilities. Then they've ranked the level of complexity in all these sectors to identify which have the greatest capacity to support high value economic growth. Finally they looked at the current industrial structure of the 10 GM local authorities to identify opportunities to expand into more complex sectors that are 'economically close' to their existing firms.

Because agglomeration will only work in those sectors where there is an existing presence or where similar industries are already present this provides a method for our cities to see where they have true potential to grow. So for example Manchester's existing strength in advertising suggests that it has potential as a hub in the higher complexity video media industry. That can guide local decisions about investment (e.g. in skills training) but also about what not to invest in. If the exercise was completed across the north it might also inform the prioritisation of transport investment decisions.
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Old August 21st, 2019, 12:44 PM   #6162
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Huyton-Roby four-tracking is now clearly visible on Google Maps satellite imagery, and even better in 3D. Does the current timetable actually rely on the 4-tracking to be operable?

As far as I'm aware the current stopping pattern is as follows:
4 tph slow Lime Street - Huyton, 2 towards Wigan and 2 towards Earlstown
2 tph fast Lime Street - Victoria
1 tph semi-fast Lime Street first stop Huyton then onto Blackpool.

As far as I can see, in neither direction are trains actually timetabled to overtake each other on the 4-tracked section, or even just parallel moves, e.g. as a slow train turns towards Wigan a fast train towards Earlstown passes at the same time.

Was the four-tracking built just to offer more resilience in the event trains are late? Or are there / were there plans to further increase train frequencies? The most obvious I can think of is another Liverpool - Preston semi-fast per hour.
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 12:00 AM   #6163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCT View Post
Huyton-Roby four-tracking is now clearly visible on Google Maps satellite imagery, and even better in 3D. Does the current timetable actually rely on the 4-tracking to be operable?

As far as I'm aware the current stopping pattern is as follows:
4 tph slow Lime Street - Huyton, 2 towards Wigan and 2 towards Earlstown
2 tph fast Lime Street - Victoria
1 tph semi-fast Lime Street first stop Huyton then onto Blackpool.

As far as I can see, in neither direction are trains actually timetabled to overtake each other on the 4-tracked section, or even just parallel moves, e.g. as a slow train turns towards Wigan a fast train towards Earlstown passes at the same time.

Was the four-tracking built just to offer more resilience in the event trains are late? Or are there / were there plans to further increase train frequencies? The most obvious I can think of is another Liverpool - Preston semi-fast per hour.
There are plans to commence direct services to Scotland in the near future, which I presume will be fast along the four track section. Cascaded 319's should open up more local services once Northern have received them all (by 2022 I think).

One also needs to consider freight workings from the Port of Liverpool. These (irregular) trains join the Chat Moss route at Edge Hill and hit the West Coast Mainline at Earlestown. My understanding is that this traffic is projected to grow with the expansion of the container terminal at Seaforth.

I used to commute along this route regularly. The peak trains from Manchester used to overtake stoppers along the line, but I don't know if that is still the case.
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Old August 22nd, 2019, 03:44 PM   #6164
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2F64 to Wigan departs at 1034.75 and 1E31 to Scarborough passes at the same time.

2F64 has a 4 minute stop, so it would likely have gotten out of the way anyway.

However, in my bored moments shortly after the new timetable change I watched the junction on open train maps and there are 4 or 5 moments each hour that seem to benefit from 4 tracking, mostly in the form of fast trains being on greens through the whole complex.
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Old Today, 02:04 AM   #6165
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I have asked this in three forums, the Scottish HS2 forum, the main HS2 forum and this one to get differing perspective from around the country on this idea, would be interested on your thoughts on this:

Interesting perspective:

https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/...ous-39-review/

here is my thought process on this.......

Save the money on the horrifically expensive Old Oak Common to Euston section and build HS2 from Old Oak Common, to Birmingham, whilst diverting funding to the Glasgow/Edinburgh connection to the border, you then have built a hybrid railway right from Scotland through to London, with particular emphasis being driving to connecting the regions of Birmingham, North England and Scotland rather than London.

The beauty of this is London is still connected, albeit by a slower path into the metropolis, but the West country, Heathrow and the centre of London (via the Elizabeth line) are still connected, at Old Oak Common.

You have then created the backbone of the NATIONAL High speed rail network, then can then be filled in on the last few miles in London and the Manc to Scottish border section in future decades.......

am I being too practical on this thought process?
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