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Old December 14th, 2009, 05:07 AM   #1
Manila-X
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Is your city more pedestrian or car oriented?

Some cities are just build for walking. Those living there walk to get around places or public transportation such as buses, subways, etc. Other large cities have low public transportation so people rely on their own cars to get around.

How about your city? Is it more pedestrian or car oriented?
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Old December 14th, 2009, 05:08 AM   #2
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Old December 14th, 2009, 06:10 AM   #3
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Toronto: car. About 1/3 of the city can be easily lived in without a car. The other 2/3s would be difficult to live in with no car, but thousands of people do it because they can't afford a car and these are the cheaper areas.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 06:47 AM   #4
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Canberra (Australia)
Very car oriented, very diffcult to live without a car, unless you live along the main bus commuter lines. This city was built by an American at the time when the motor car was break through technology. Density is increasing slowly, but it will be a long time before this city gets any type of rail.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 06:50 AM   #5
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In Baltimore, many neighborhoods are walkable but you need a car to get between them unless you live along the light rail or metro line(there is one line for each system).
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Old December 14th, 2009, 09:28 AM   #6
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Frankfurt has excellent public transportation and the inner city is quite walkable. But at the same time its also very easy to move around by car and public parking is abundant and affordable compared to other cities.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 10:05 AM   #7
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Like most cities in the western US, very little of Albuquerque predates the automobile. Our city exploded in the 1950s just as auto-oriented urban planning took over and we were left a miserable legacy of gridded boulevards, parking lots and strip malls. Any walkability we regain will come as a result of increasing density rather than any major new planning initiatives which are always discussed but are way too expensive. A trolley system would cost $40 million per mile for a city so sprawled out that we'd need 20-30 miles of light rail just on one axis. Denver, seattle, Portland, San Francisco and large parts of LA, San Diego, El Paso, and a few others are quite walkable.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 11:06 AM   #8
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Most downtown San Diego is walkable, but overall the city is car-oriented.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 11:29 AM   #9
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Zwolle is a city of 120,000 and the capital of the Overijssel province, and a job center for the region.

I'd rather compare cyclists or cars. It depends on what kind of destination we're talking about, for instance, towards the historic city center, cycling has a very high share, I think around 70%. However, if you talk about job centers (office centers, industrial areas, retail) it's far more car centered. This frequently leads to discrepancy between the number of commuters by car and the available parking. Some areas have significant parking problems, also in adjacent neighborhoods, it just swells over from the office parks to the residential areas.

Public transport is mostly used by the elderly and students and plays no significant role in commuting to work in my city. The Zwolle train station is one of the more important though, you can go to 8 directions in a few years (now 7) by train.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 12:11 PM   #10
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London is heavily public transport orientated - but also there was alot of cars despite. To discourage car usage of course
they installed the famous congestion charge -$13 a day to enter central London.



Major cities per capita petrol use by population density:



They were also in the middle of introducing a CO2 charge whereby high polluting vehicles such as 4x4s
(aka in London, Chelsea tractors) would be charged $40 a day, and high polluting heavy goods vehicles
a whopping $300. However with regime change, the new mayor Boris Johnson scrapped the proposals.



There is also a huge underground network (the longest by track km):




and an even bigger rail network, thanx to Nick Taylor for making this great image:




a map of distances to a rail (grey), tube (blue) or tram (green) station in 1 and a quarter miles




with a vast commuter belt




Bus routes are even more extensive - this just a small area (Cheam), right on the far edge of the city:




They have also pedestrianised alot of the centre (such as Covent Garden, Leicester Square, Chinatown and hopefully, one day, Oxford Street and Parliament Square),
but on many routes the car is still vital. On most streets since the 1990s though the pavements have gradually widened, and the road surface squeezed
in, after years of having it the other way round.








and many streets in the entertainment districts become ad-hoc pedestrianised playgrounds where cars daren't venture:

(my pix)











and at Xmas the main shopping streets get pedestrianised to cope with the crowds (as much as 2 million in and around Oxford Street alone):




..although they're only open to buses and taxis anyway:







...and yet despite all that many people still own cars...grrrrr....




Last edited by the spliff fairy; December 14th, 2009 at 12:56 PM.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 12:15 PM   #11
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The Gold Coast has pretty bad public transport (consists of buses which come every half hour, that's about it). You would get nowhere without a car, and even then; you get stuck in traffic jams and get nowhere.

Entering my city:



This picture is old, but in 2009 this bridge is constantly backed up with traffic... either way, it's still a very car-oriented city.

image hosted on flickr

Francesco2020

Last edited by Dimethyltryptamine; December 15th, 2009 at 03:31 AM.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 12:40 PM   #12
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Amsterdam does not like cars. Inside the ring road traffic is bad, parking is expensive. The public transportation system is pretty good (subways and trams), but the true king of the street is the bicycle.

Outside of the ring it's more mixed. Especially places like business parks, large hardware stores and stores like IKEA are more car oriented.

But in general:

(the three x-es are the symbol of Amsterdam)
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Old December 14th, 2009, 01:27 PM   #13
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Indeed, within the Ring A10, Amsterdam is very car-unfriendly! Outside the Ring, it's free parking. In the centre a parkinglot cost €5,- per hour ($7,35).
For daytourist by car, they can park at Transferiums at the boundaries of the city. It cost €6,- per day includes free metrotickets.



Cycling is also forbidden in the pedestrianstreets. Otherwise you wil risk a fine. (€60,-/$88,-)
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Old December 14th, 2009, 02:22 PM   #14
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Cyclists need to be educated, informed and perhaps fined when they go over pedestrianized areas of Dutch cities. Many of them think they have an absolute right of way and that every pedestrian should "make a room" for them to cycle over pedestrian-only areas.

They harass pedestrians a lot in Amsterdam, far more than car drivers. I myself have been almost hit twice in downtown Amsterdam. I do not use cyclepaths as a sidewalk (another traffic problem), neither should them take shortcuts ringing their bells frantically and coming over a pedestrianized street.

For the same reason, I'm totally against "mixed-used" streets. There ought to be a clear space marked for cars, a second layer for bikes, and then the sidewalk.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 03:21 PM   #15
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Copenhagen is by far mostly pedestrian oriented with most of the old town entirely car free and bike lanes and PT prioritized above the cars..
[IMG]http://i44.************/i1ma78.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i41.************/21mgsyf.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i28.************/sdo2ro.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i47.************/2s95f81.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i27.************/nzisuw.jpg[/IMG]


Much more here: https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...456862&page=13
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Old December 14th, 2009, 07:11 PM   #16
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I hear more and more american planners cite Copenhagen as the holy grail of New Urbanist visions for their cities...and no wonder!
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Old December 14th, 2009, 08:57 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WANCH View Post
Unfortunately, public transportation is scarce after midnight so the taxi is the only choice but expensive especially if you coming from the city centre.
they really need to improve this deficiency. i would be among the first people to sign a petition for a 24/7 subway in HK.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 09:21 PM   #18
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Coppenhagen is the paradise for those who are damm rich. Try yourselves to afford a middle-class life there with a family, would be impossible. I mean, a house/apartment with 150-180m2, one car only, couple working in different regions of the city and young children that need to be transportet to/from.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 09:33 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andrelot View Post
Cyclists need to be educated, informed and perhaps fined when they go over pedestrianized areas of Dutch cities. Many of them think they have an absolute right of way and that every pedestrian should "make a room" for them to cycle over pedestrian-only areas.

They harass pedestrians a lot in Amsterdam, far more than car drivers. I myself have been almost hit twice in downtown Amsterdam. I do not use cyclepaths as a sidewalk (another traffic problem), neither should them take shortcuts ringing their bells frantically and coming over a pedestrianized street.

For the same reason, I'm totally against "mixed-used" streets. There ought to be a clear space marked for cars, a second layer for bikes, and then the sidewalk.
I couldn't agree less. Mixed use works perfect. Sure, cyclists are kind of punk in the Netherlands in the sense that even grandmas ignore traffic lights, but one could call that a cultural thing. People get fined for that - and for driving trough pedestrian only zones - but that's part of the culture perhaps. People don't experience real friction between cyclists and pedestrians. In fact, I never saw a pedestrian get hit by a bicycle, even at places where things are deliberately made unclear. Except perhaps a tourist who is completely ignorant of the concept of a bicycle path, or who thinks being passed by a cyclist on close distance means being almost hit, but I wouldn't propose to model of a city on the ignorance of tourists.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 11:36 PM   #20
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Of course you wouldn't plan a street design on tourists' ignorance, but from a pedestrian viewpoint, cyclists sharing the same space with pedestirans are always going to be a hassle.

Look, I'm not talking about those small roads built go give access to properties inside a block. I'm talking about neighborhood and zone troughfares, where everyone is better is the road has 3 clear separated sections: cars, bikes and pedestrians.

Of course, even better than thar are bike paths than run completely separatedly from streets, allowing less interference with both cars and pedestrians.
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