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Old August 18th, 2012, 08:26 PM   #1
Ras Siyan
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Vision 2035

Studies on Vision 2035 have been launched in March 15, they will elaborate the objectives and components of the Vision 2035 that should be adopted in September.

Les préparations de l’étude prospective sur la Vision 2035 on commencé le 15 Mars, elles vont élaborer les objectifs et les composantes de la Vision 2035 qui doit être adoptée en Septembre.


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Vision Djibouti 2035

Tous concernés

L’hôtel Sheraton a abrité jeudi 15 mars dernier le lancement des travaux de la "Vision Djibouti 2035". Une étude prospective dont la mise en œuvre est assortie d’une série concertations au préalable avec les différentes composantes de la communauté nationale et les partenaires au développement. Il s’agit pour ses instigateurs de peser par ce biais sur le cours du devenir commun, souhaité et non subi, de l’ensemble des djiboutiens, toutes classes d’âges confondues.

Le ministre de l’Economie et des Finances, M Ilyas Moussa Dawaleh, a procédé jeudi 15 mars dernier au lancement des travaux sur l’étude nationale prospective et intitulée "Vision Djibouti 2035" au Sheraton.

L’évènement a regroupé sur place un parterre de secrétaires généraux et de cadres supérieurs de différents ministères sectoriels et de responsables issus des rangs respectifs des représentations des bailleurs de fonds et du système des nations unies à Djibouti.

Dans son mot d’ouverture de l’atelier, le ministre Ilyas Moussa Dawaleh a d’emblée évoqué les côtés essentiel et primordial d’une appropriation collective des grandes orientations de cette étude prospective. Il a ensuite soulevé les motifs de son élaboration.

Il s’agit pour le gouvernement d’instaurer par ce biais une planification stratégique des perspectives de développement national sur le long terme.

Il a également mis en exergue les défis majeurs et les enjeux de la " Vision Djibouti 2035" qui nécessiteront des politiques et des actions de transformation en vue d’accélérer et construire ensemble un futur de plus en plus souhaité et de moins en moins subi.

On retrouve une appréciation similaire dans les discours que les représentants du FMI, de la Banque mondiale et du FNUAP ont improvisés du haut de la tribune officielle.

Cette convergence de vues a suscité des échanges interactifs entre les participants de l’atelier sur divers aspects du sujet.

Les uns et les autres ont par ailleurs écouté d’une oreille attentive plusieurs exposés sur des thématiques aussi variées que sont la démographie et la population, l’identité et les valeurs culturelles, la bonne gouvernance et la stabilité politique, le capital humain et l’accès aux services sociaux de base, l’intégration régionale et la coopération internationale.

Les interventions d’experts ont par la suite nourri un débat soutenu entre les intervenants de l’atelier autour de la pertinence, des conditions et des objectifs de la "Vision Djibouti 2035".

Une perspective globale de développement qui concerne l’ensemble des djiboutiens, toutes classes d’âges confondues.
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Old August 18th, 2012, 08:44 PM   #2
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Vision 2035: A Long-Term Development Plan

For Djibouti’s Minister of Economy and Finance, Ilyas Moussa Dawaleh, the need for forward planning is imperative. In this interview with New African, he describes Vision 2035 and the challenges and opportunities that now confront the country.

Q: Would you outline Djibouti’s Vision 2035 concept and its objectives?

A: We used to formulate very short-term national policies, sometimes on an annual basis but we realised that there were a lot of challenges ahead and risks on the way. For this reason we needed to plan over a longer period. We accept that we will probably not be able to achieve all our objectives during the current administration, but Vision 2035 clearly sets out the aspirations of the President and his government. We also want to encourage Djiboutian citizens to take ownership of this vision themselves, as they have a key role to play. We believe that with this initiative we are encouraging Djiboutians to achieve their own success in what is now a fast-paced and very competitive new world. The Vision 2035 is also based on the key pillars of encouraging economic integration, good governance and human development. This all means increased communication with the people to inform them of the wider opportunities that are available to them.



Q: Djibouti’s economic success is intrinsically linked to the wider region. How would you characterise the relationship with your development partners at this time?

A: Djibouti has limited resources and a relatively small population. However, Djibouti’s location has a key strategic geographic position. As one of our colleagues from the IMF mentioned: “The geo-strategic position of Djibouti means the same thing that oil means to Saudi Arabia.”

Of course, this unique location means that we must sustain the momentum regionally to facilitate greater trade and integrate our economies, making sure our neighbours are able to take advantage of our logistics and related services.

For example, Ethiopia has, over the last 15 years, experienced a high rate of growth, and needless to say, the more Ethiopia grows the more the Djibouti economy follows suit.

Djibouti’s GDP is linked specifically to the port and other logistical services, which in tandem is connected to the growth of the Ethiopian economy. This is why we are working with the Ethiopians on a long-term vision to ensure Djibouti remains stable, competitive and has access to international markets. This will ensure our relations with Ethiopia continue to flourish as it embarks on its industrialisation drive. One of the key points to their industrial development is that the whole process must be integrated, meaning competitive logistics must be in place, and this is where Djibouti will play a key role.

We are also planning a cross-border industrialisation programme, to add value to our exports. We need to create a cross-border duty-free zone to integrate Djibouti’s economy with Ethiopia’s and provide a gateway to other economies in the region of commercial interest, such as South Sudan.



Q: Internally there are some challenges to growth and investment in Djibouti, namely high energy costs and water stress issues. What initiatives does the ministry have in place to combat these problems?

A: These are two major concerns regarding Djibouti’s economic development, and we are actively seeking strategies to address them. The geothermal electricity generating programme is the number one priority of Djibouti’s government and our geothermal potential is acknowledged as one of the largest in the world. We plan to couple this potential with other renewable energy projects such as solar and wind energy. By tapping into these assets with the assistance of our development partners being led by the World Bank, we are confident of resolving our energy problems in the next three years and we may even be in a position to export energy. Already we have embarked on the first salt lake geothermal development plan.

We are also looking at solutions to our water supply constraints and have an EU desalination project and other public-private partnership programmes. We also bring water from Ethiopia for some areas of the south of Djibouti, and at the same time we are conducting our own research and development with highly skilled engineers. We anticipate that the challenge of water will, like our energy sector, be tackled successfully in less than three years.



Q: What message would you like to get across to our readers about Djibouti today and the country’s investment opportunities?

A: Djibouti certainly has the potential to become another Singapore, Hong Kong or Dubai and there are myriad investment opportunities here related to our unique geostrategic location. Equally importantly there are many untapped business sectors such as tourism. I believe we have the possibility of becoming one of the top marine tourism attractions in the world, if the requisite infrastructure and facilities are put in place. We welcome international investors to come and take advantage of these opportunities.

We are already working hard with our partners and neighbouring countries to create critical infrastructure such as roads, airports and dry ports to serve as a gateway not just to the rest of Africa but also to the Gulf region as a whole.

Another area of investment potential is telecommunications and our telecommunications ministry is inviting major international players to Djibouti to make use of the most advanced sub-sea fibre-optic cable facilities in Africa. This is just a snapshot of some of the opportunities available in Djibouti today, and there are many more!
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Old November 11th, 2014, 06:43 AM   #3
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Djibouti Turns to its Peers for Advice on Reaching its Goals

Djibouti has outlined an ambitious set of development goals it hopes to achieve over the next two decades

The World Bank has contributed by identifying areas with potential for growth and job creation, and organizing a conference with countries that have made progress on similar goals

The conference afforded Djibouti critical lessons on the importance of transparency, good governance, fostering competition and building broad consensus to achieve the goal of accelerated development



Djibouti is preparing for the future. The small country on the Horn of Africa has outlined an ambitious set of goals it hopes to achieve over the next two decades. These goals are the result of careful research, assisted by the World Bank, to identify under-exploited sectors of the economy with the potential to generate sustainable growth. The results of the exercise were collected in a document, ‘Djibouti Vision 2035’ that serves as the government’s blueprint for development.

Ilyas Moussa Dawaleh, Djibouti’s Minister of Economy and Finance, in charge of Industry, recently recalled that at independence in 1977 his country had only one high school, one street and two doctors. Djibouti has since taken advantage of its strategic position at the mouth of the Red Sea, along one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes, to develop an important maritime port and establish the foundations for a burgeoning commercial hub.

Djibouti still faces high levels of poverty, and is committed to doing much more to promote economic growth and the job creation and shared prosperity that come with it. The World Bank study (“A new growth model for Djibouti”) that underpins ‘Djibouti Vision 2035’ highlighted the following promising areas: transport and logistics, telecommunications, tourism, fisheries, and light industry. “Djibouti needs to get over that ‘hump,’” observed Shanta Devarajan, World Bank Chief Economist for the Middle East and North Africa Region, “where you turn yourself from a natural resource based economy into a dynamic manufacturing and service center.”

It was precisely to get over that ‘hump,’ that Djibouti turned to its peers for advice. In assisting with the preparation of the report, the World Bank also identified a number of countries with similar characteristics to Djibouti that had success in achieving similar goals. The World Bank and the government worked together to host a south to south exchange of knowledge, in which representatives of Cape Verde, Dubai and Mauritius were invited to Djibouti to share their valuable experiences.

An event was organized that drew over 300 local and foreign participants from government, development partners, the private sector, civil society, and academia. The government used the opportunity to launch ‘Djibouti Vision 2035’. In his opening speech, the Prime Minister of Djibouti, Abdoulkhader Kamil Mohamed reaffirmed the commitment to reinforcing strengths and diversifying the economy as the key ingredients of the country’s development plan.

One of the most valuable lessons to emerge from the south to south exchange of knowledge, according to World Bank Resident Representative in Djibouti, Homa-Zahra Fotouhi was that countries not only share similar goals, but also face similar obstacles. Djibouti, she noted, is small country with high energy costs – but so too are Cape Verde and Mauritius. Yet Mauritius has made significant progress in diversifying its economy and Cape Verde has successfully developed its tourism sector. These were the lessons each came to share.

The level of attendance and engagement at the event was unprecedented for Djibouti. It reflected the interest on the part of the country’s private sector and civil society to learn from the experiences of other countries, and to be central players in the design and implementation of Djibouti’s development strategy. This resonated with another overarching lesson from the event, on the importance of building a broad consensus around specific goals.

The cases of Mauritius and Cape Verde – which recorded significant improvements in the space of a few years – particularly demonstrate the importance of transparency, good governance and competition to promote economic diversification and encourage job creation. These are the basic elements of a formula that could bring Djibouti a step closer to reducing poverty and achieving sustainable and inclusive growth for the benefit of the entire population.

The event also provided the government with specific advice on each of he areas it plans to focus on. The government will convert this advice into concrete actions for the realization of ‘Djibouti Vision 2035’, and for establishing a broad consensus around the goal of accelerated development.

“In the next 20 years we would like Djibouti to reach the level of Singapore or Dubai,” said Youssouf Moussa Dawaleh, President of the Djibouti Chamber of Commerce, “we can get there if we work together.”
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Old November 11th, 2014, 06:45 AM   #4
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Djibouti 2035: A South-South Knowledge Exchange Experience

Djibouti is preparing for the future. The tiny country in the Horn of Africa has outlined an ambitious set of goals it hopes to achieve by 2035. These goals are the result of careful research, assisted by the World Bank, to identify sectors of the economy with the potential to generate growth. As part of this exercise, the World Bank brought representatives from Cape Verde, Dubai and Mauritius—countries that faced similar obstacles in the past—to Djibouti to share their experiences.

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