Edinburgh Office Developments - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > Scottish Architecture Forum > Edinburgh

Edinburgh Architecture in and around Scotland's capital.


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 89 votes, 5.00 average.
Old September 17th, 2013, 08:50 PM   #1
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Edinburgh Office Developments

Location: The Exchange
Cost: £85m (incl. EICC expansion)
Developer: The City of Edinburgh Council, Scottish Enterprise and the Edinburgh International Conference Centre
Architect: BDP
Current Status: Complete Spring 2013



ATRIA ONE

186,519 sq ft of office accommodation over seven storeys and 4,000 sq ft of retail space across three units.












ATRIA TWO

13,218 sq ft of office accommodation (over EICC expansion).



Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old September 17th, 2013, 08:59 PM   #2
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Location: Fountainbridge
Cost: Unknown
Developer: Corran Properties
Architect: Michael Laird Architects
Current Status: Planning

13/03816/PAN | Demolition of existing building, erection of replacement new mixed-use building comprising retail, offices, plant, basement parking and associated works. | 142 Lothian Road 54A Fountainbridge Edinburgh EH3 9BQ



A previous scheme by Michael Laird Architects for the same site was approved in 2011. This plan retained the B-listed facade which fronts Fountainbridge - the current development proposes demolishing this building.

The previous Semple Street scheme (2011)


Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2013, 05:57 PM   #3
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Edinburgh Reporter - 7th October, 2013



Quote:
Property advisers CKD Galbraith report significant signs of improvement in the commercial office sector as Edinburgh sees its strongest quarterly uptake in office space since the start of the recession in 2008.

The independent Scottish property consultancy found that overall take up in Q3 (July to September 2013) will be in excess of 270,000 sq ft – a 225% increase on the previous quarter (at approximately 120,000 sq ft).

Significant lettings in the city include

West Edinburgh
· 85,000 sq ft at 3 Lochside Avenue (whole building) to Sainsbury’s Bank
· 33,000 sq ft to Jardine Lloyd Thompson at 7 Lochside Avenue.

Edinburgh City centre
· 55,000 sq ft at Capital House to Bank of New York Mellon
· 32,000 sq ft at Atria One to PwC
· Skyscanner have taken the remaining landlord space at Quartermile One.

Michael Clements, marketing agent at CKD Galbraith, said: “The level of uptake this quarter has demonstrated that there is a strong demand for high quality Grade A accommodation in the Edinburgh market.

“However, these recent lettings have further eroded the supply of this type of premium office space, which is now extremely tight in the city centre.

“With little new development underway and several larger requirements in the market, it is likely that supply will tighten further in the short term, which should result in increased rental levels, reduced incentives and potentially some further pre-letting activity on other schemes in the city.”

He continued: “If this trend continues, we could shortly see the Edinburgh market flip back from being a tenant’s market to a landlord’s market.”
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old October 28th, 2013, 08:58 PM   #4
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Atria Edinburgh

Urban Realm - 23rd October, 2013



Quote:
In a rare sign of life in the commercial property sector BDP have completed work on Atria, Edinburgh, offering both open plan office space to tenants and an extension to the Edinburgh International Conference Centre. Opening its doors in the nick of time for this year’s festival it expands capacity and offers improved facilities for visitors, as well as being the final piece in the jigsaw of the exchange district business quarter. In the calm before this storm Urban Realm paid a visit to find out what it has to offer both for festival-goers and occupants. Photography by Keith Hunter and David Barbour.

With such a large scheme permeability to the surrounding streets was always going to be challenging and this is adroitly addressed by splitting accommodation into separate office and conference elements - and cleaving through a pedestrian passageway lined with retail units. This diagonal route achieves the dual benefits of breaking up a monolithic mass, squashed to fit within severe sight lines toward Edinburgh Castle, whilst also granting pedestrians north south passage. Etched into the sandstone of this space is a stylised city skyline complete with a quotation from local literary luminary Alexander McCall Smith.

Paved in Caithness granite, specified in favour of York stone which was found to have prematurely weathered, these external spaces lead to the scheme’s most striking feature - a 15m cantilever tied directly to the central core. This core supports the entire building by way of bridge style trusses vaulting a 50m x 30m all-purpose open span hall below. Within the retaining wall giant 4.5m doors have been carved to provide direct access between old and new parts of the building.

Ensconced within the streetscape the buildings belie their true scale which becomes apparent only when venturing into the subterranean network of rooms and passageways which run beneath the surface. The stygian gloom at these depths has necessitated generous circulation spaces to invite light and the careful consideration of lighting includes features such as a fully programmable LED media wall. “A lot of conference goers come over jet lagged and you can actually time the lighting to reverse their jet lag’ observed project architect Garth Fitzsimons. “The media wall won’t play text or anything, it only has a resolution of 16 pixels but it can show shapes and fire and even a Mini driving through.”

The ability to ferry large scale objects up and down is made possible by a multitude of rigging points situated every three metres throughout the communal space. These have allowed a Mini to be suspended from the ceiling to tease passers-by, particularly those standing beneath it. Another key feature of the space is the 16.5m long champagne bar, second in size only to one at St Pancras (if you include their seating area). Somewhat fitting given that the site was once home to Princes Street Station, more popular than Waverley amongst locals as it avoided the need to plumb Waverley’s precipitous depths. “With the retaining wall directly behind the idea was to punch through the underground windows with cove blue lighting,” added Fitzsimons: “The bar reflects what is going on up on Morrison Street and again picks up the context of the railway line, which diverts at this point to Dundee.”

In many ways the extension proved the most difficult for the design team, as instead of starting from scratch as with the office block the team faced the tricky proposition of marrying the fire and acoustic specification Terry Farrell’s existing work. It is the main hall which is the focal point of the complex however as Fitzsimons explains: “The concrete box containing the hall is standalone to the Atria building and presented a structural challenge of building a box within a box.

The air flow also has to be adaptable depending on where the floor is and there’s a stack effect because there are two large volumes. We modelled all this in BIM. The floor itself is completely unique, the hydraulic lifts are a world first. Each section lifts separately, tiered all the way down to the stage in front or to the far end.” This necessitates seven metre high partitions folding directly into the oak panelled acoustic walls. Even more impressive - all this mechanical wizardry can switch between pre-programmed configurations in as little as fifteen minutes.

Fitzsimons continued: “The time is spent checking that it’s free moving up the walls and that all the chairs are laid out. Then you’ve got to drop down stairs at the back. Everything has to be flush to the wall from fire escape signs to entrance points and even ironmongery on doors, had to be built to 6mm precision. The other challenge as the floor moves up is that we end up covering some of the escape doors, so for every configuration we’ve got a different escape strategy. What we ended up having to do was cover up different signs and turn new ones on for every configuration. There’s a three point checking system with someone up in the control room to handle the floor, someone at the sides to control the doors together with a manual safety lock. Just so that somebody can’t pull the door open from the backside only to see the void underneath the floor. There’s an undercroft about 2m deep which mainly contains six hydraulic lifts per table and a huge amount of electrical trunking. With the whole thing moving it puts an extra stress on cables getting caught.”

The only other teething problems stemmed from unforeseen movement, as when people shift in unison at particularly rowdy performances the resonance produced a Millennium Bridge style wobble. Another issue was achieving consistency of lux levels and the lights themselves are pre-set for each of the floor configurations. Fitzsimons added: “There are 2,000 seats in total necessitating temporary stairs which drop down to give fire escape access as egress is necessarily tricky, being underground, for the climb up to Morrison Street. As such we’ve squeezed in scissor stairs spaces to maximise escape width, although to the north the loading bay is directly accessible.”
A central control room which wouldn’t look out of place on the space shuttle sits at the back of the hall, and is the nerve centre for everything from breakout rooms and café to foyers and sound systems. With a flick of a button floors are raised and lowered and walls retracted in accordance with the demands of each performance. One of the first to benefit was no less than Bill Clinton who put the venue through its paces during a sell-out speech.

Adding a touch of personality to the corporate interiors is the lift voice which is provided by the centres very own marketing director, although the elevator itself is sadly opaque because of an illuminated crown, that blocks lines of sight through the central atrium. Another claim to fame is that, at the time, the project boasted the largest commercial kitchen contract in the UK outside of the Olympic village, although the latter was just temporary.

The neighbouring office block meanwhile offers 200,000sq/ft of space wrapped around a seven storey atrium. “We had to draw up some innovative plans to get the building to work with these deep floor plans,” explained Fitzsimons. “One of the features is the full height fire rated curtain walling with a bridge going across the full cantilever. The trusses were initially exposed but by the nature of the splice connections, which were neither regular nor random, we covered them up.”

The building itself steps in from the sixth floor to maximise the building footprint without impinging upon the wider protected views of Edinburgh Castle. This placed tight restrictions on the roofscape, going as far as to stipulate obscure views from inaccessible railway bridges. As such the footprint is consistent up to level four, reflecting the street level tenement flats on Morrison Street whilst at the other end the neighbouring Scottish Widows building affords a little more leniency in height, something which the architects have taken full advantage of by stepping the façade in from the sixth floor and fashioning a roof terrace. There are four such terraces in total in addition to a green roof on top, all of which boast spectacular vantage across the city skyline.

The angular form of BDP’s intervention contrast with the drum of Farrell’s conference centre after its designers concluded that there was no point in competing with it. The result is a plain vanilla building envelope which hides some accomplished engineering, sadly obscured from view. For the first time since West Princes Street Station Exchange Place is finally going places.
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2013, 11:12 PM   #5
Moschops
Registered User
 
Moschops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 984
Likes (Received): 1363

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
They dug an impressively deep hole in the ground while they were building that. I can't tell you how many times I stopped on my way past to watch progress. I kept on meaning to take my camera out with me to document its construction, but sadly never did...
Moschops no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2013, 12:18 AM   #6
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moschops View Post
They dug an impressively deep hole in the ground while they were building that. I can't tell you how many times I stopped on my way past to watch progress. I kept on meaning to take my camera out with me to document its construction, but sadly never did...
Beneath the Atria One building is the new expansion of the EICC. I'm guessing the excavation was probably for that?
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2013, 01:25 AM   #7
Moschops
Registered User
 
Moschops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 984
Likes (Received): 1363

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
Beneath the Atria One building is the new expansion of the EICC. I'm guessing the excavation was probably for that?
Yes. I did some digging to give you an idea. This elevation from the planning application doesn't really do it justice.



But I found this video from the EICC website. I can't work out how to embed it unfortunately.

http://www.eicc.co.uk/media/28475/january_2011.mp4

EDIT: I grabbed a still from that video. For scale, note the diggers against the back wall, and compare the height of the back wall with the tenement building at the top-right.


Last edited by Moschops; February 25th, 2014 at 11:42 PM.
Moschops no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2013, 02:48 PM   #8
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Tram line helps seal computer firm office deal

Edinburgh Evening News - 19th November, 2013

Quote:
A major supplier to computer giant Apple has opened a new test centre near the tram line in a move which is being hailed as a sign that the route will prove to be a magnet for new businesses.

One of Europe’s fastest growing computer firms, Stuttgart-based Dialog Semiconductor, has signed a ten-year lease to open its second Edinburgh office in the Sighthill Industrial Estate.

The fact the premises are a five-minute walk from the Bankhead tram stop is said to have been crucial in sealing the deal.

Property investor Iain Mercer – son of former Hearts owner Wallace Mercer – said the deal was a sign that Sighthill and Edinburgh Park were likely to become increasingly important business hubs as a direct result of the much-maligned trams scheme.

Dialog will test components such as microchips for tablets and MP3 players at its new 1200sq ft premises at Birch House in Sighthill. Apple, which is due to open a flagship store in Edinburgh next year, is Dialog’s biggest client.

The German firm is the second major company to let office space there in the last five months, following Hollander International Systems taking 3480sq ft of space on the ground floor of the same block.

Mr Mercer, group managing director of landlord Cosmopolitan Investments, said the close proximity to the tram stop had been the “icing on the cake”.

He said: “We’re dealing with a network that has really been shrouded in controversy for the last few years and people weren’t sure if it was going to be completed. Finally they’ve got their act together over the last six months – that is only generating confidence.

“The tram stop at Bankhead is a five-minute walk from this building and already the occupiers that we have secured have identified that as a very good tool for them in terms of attracting staff and being within 15 minutes of the city centre or ten minutes of the airport.

“Certainly Edinburgh Park and the west Edinburgh office market, which has struggled over the last five or six years, is now seeing something of a resurgence.”

Dialog also has 14,000sq ft of office space at Multrees Walk, off St Andrew Square.

Mr Mercer’s prediction comes on the back of a series of developments being announced for sites near other tram stops, including three hotels near York Place and three supermakets and a hotel in Shandwick Place.

Other cities including Dublin have reported a “tram effect” after opening tram lines.

City transport convener Lesley Hinds said: “It’s great to see developers taking advantage of the benefits that the tram can bring to their businesses. With streets clear of tram works and a passenger service fast approaching, it’s the ideal time to invest in Edinburgh.”
Bankhead tram stop
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2013, 12:05 PM   #9
Haddington
Registered User
 
Haddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 112
Likes (Received): 4

Interesting to hear of office activity in Sighthill / Ed Park.

Wonder if the long discussed southern expansion of Ed Park will be happening anytime soon ?
Haddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2013, 02:30 PM   #10
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haddington View Post
Interesting to hear of office activity in Sighthill / Ed Park.

Wonder if the long discussed southern expansion of Ed Park will be happening anytime soon ?
I wouldn't be surprised if the tram kick-started things again. Last I heard, they were hoping to include a significant amount of residential development as well as office accommodation.
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2013, 02:43 PM   #11
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Parts of Charlotte Square development now complete

Edinburgh Reporter - 19th November, 2013



Quote:
The transformation of the properties on the south side of Charlotte Square, Edinburgh’s classic Georgian masterpiece, has reached a major milestone with the completion of the refurbishment and redevelopment of numbers 26-31, designed by Morgan McDonnell Architecture Limited.

The six townhouses that made up the former headquarters of The National Trust of Scotland have been reconfigured to form four new properties that blend period architecture and features with the requirements of 21st century businesses.

The architectural integrity of the A-listed townhouses has been restored through a comprehensive programme of repair, replacement and reinstatement of authentic features, while a new four storey office with underground parking on Hope Street Lane to the rear is linked to Number 28 by a dramatic light-filled atrium.

The properties, part of The Charlotte Square Collection, a managed estate of 19 properties around the Square, have been designed to reaffirm Charlotte Square’s position as the most prestigious and sought after address for Scotland’s financial services industry. Cornelian Asset Managers and Ruffer LLP have secured tenancies in numbers 30 and 31, while SCOBAN, the new private bank has taken up residency at No. 9 along the north side of the Square.

Interest in the other properties has been boosted by the production of a dedicated Charlotte Square magazine, CSq, which reflects The Collection’s philosophy for quality and sense of custodianship for the Square’s heritage.

Nick Ball of Corran Properties, which acts as developer and asset manager for The Charlotte Square Collection, said:-“One of the most exciting consequences of the redevelopment of the south side of Charlotte Square is that we are changing perceptions about townhouses as modern office space.

“Georgian townhouses within London’s historic squares are seen as the most prestigious office space. By comparison, in Edinburgh, many have been allowed to degenerate, giving the perception that they have had their day. We are changing that. With the reconstruction now complete, we have proved that these historic buildings can have a life as contemporary office space without losing their distinct character. The affect is spectacular and we look forward to welcoming many more companies to Charlotte Square.”

The renovations have also received praise from Edinburgh World Heritage (EWT), which has been closely involved in the progress of the redevelopment. Adam Wilkinson, director of EWT said:-”The Charlotte Square Collection is supporting the long term care and use of one of the most handsome squares in Europe. Charlotte Square is a key part of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site, and embodies the ideals of the Scottish Enlightenment. The restoration and sensitive adaptation of these wonderful buildings really sets the standard for our city.”

The Collection provides a range of accommodation types, specifications and sizes and will be managed as an estate with a long term commitment to the success of this as a premier business address. Where buildings are being developed, designs capitalise on new technology and construction techniques. The offices on the south side have been accredited C or C+ energy rating and a ‘very good’ BREEAM rating.

Morgan McDonnell are the architects on the project. Cushman & Wakefield and CuthbertWhite are the agents acting on behalf of Corran Properties.
Nice promotional film about the development on the official site (can't embed).

__________________

indiekid, heresjohnny liked this post
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2013, 03:05 PM   #12
Haddington
Registered User
 
Haddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 112
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
I wouldn't be surprised if the tram kick-started things again. Last I heard, they were hoping to include a significant amount of residential development as well as office accommodation.
Residential could maybe kick start something there. Anything would be preferable to the current wasteland.

It is a prime site, with a tram line running through the middle of it, and maybe the problems Edinburgh has had with oversupply of office space for many years are now less of an issue.

One to watch.
Haddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2013, 05:36 PM   #13
Monkey9000
£€$$ is more
 
Monkey9000's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 1,703
Likes (Received): 367

Certainly is one being developed, currently with a higher proportion of Residential to Office, one to watch as Haddington says.
Monkey9000 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2013, 02:48 PM   #14
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Praise for Charlotte Square after £1m refurb

Edinburgh Evening News - 27th November 2013



Quote:
Heritage chiefs have heaped praise on the £1 million redevelopment of some of the Capital’s most prized Georgian buildings.

Work was undertaken at the former headquarters of The National Trust of Scotland (NTS) on the south side of Charlotte Square in the past
18 months.

The six townhouses that once made up the HQ have been reconfigured into four properties, their period architecture “blended alongside the requirements of new 21st century businesses”.

Developer Corran Properties hopes the refurbishment will reaffirm Charlotte Square’s position as the most prestigious and sought-after address for Scotland’s financial services industry.

The A-listed properties, numbers 26-31, are part of The Charlotte Square Collection, a managed estate of 19 properties around the square.

Designed by Morgan McDonnell Architecture, the works also feature a new four-storey office with underground parking on Hope Street Lane to the rear which is linked to number 28 by an atrium.

All properties are interlinked via a horizontal courtyard
garden laid on top of existing car parking.

The work has been praised by Edinburgh World Heritage (EWT).

Adam Wilkinson, director of EWT said: “The Charlotte Square Collection is supporting the long-term care and use of one of the most handsome squares in Europe.

“It is a key part of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site, and embodies the ideals of the Scottish Enlightenment. The restoration and sensitive adaptation of these wonderful buildings really sets the standard for our city.”

Designed by Robert Adam in 1820, the building had lain derelict for over a year after the NTS relocated to Hermiston Quay in Edinburgh Park in October 2010.

However, not all heritage bodies have been complimentary of the plans. The Cockburn Association criticised plans, claiming they were “unexceptional and bland”.

Director Marion Williams: “Our issue was mainly to do with the rear of the properties and the loss of character along the lane.

“On the square the frontage looks very well and they’ve not done any harm there. I look forward to getting a proper look inside though.”
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2013, 02:59 PM   #15
Leki
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 552
Likes (Received): 185

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
Praise for Charlotte Square after £1m refurb

Edinburgh Evening News - 27th November 2013

I haven't seen this properly yet, but it certainly looks like a great development.

I'm always making digs at the Cockburn Association, but their condescending opposition to absolutely everything is becoming tiresome.
Leki no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2013, 05:59 PM   #16
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

£1.9m funding boost for b-listed Craigmillar business base

STV Edinburgh - 28th November, 2013

Quote:
Craigmillar is set to be given a boost as the City of Edinburgh Council is set to receive £1.9m of regeneration funding from the Scottish Government to transform Castlebrae Business Centre, currently occupied by business incubator hub, Cre8te Opportunities Limited.

The Centre in Peffer Place was constructed in 1936 as the Niddrie Marischal Secondary School, later becoming an annexe of Craigmillar High School.

An Art-Deco style building, it is category B listed and owned by the Council. The funding will help to transform the premises into quality office space for 40 units.

Cllr Frank Ross, Convener of the Economy Committee, said: “This is great news for everyone involved in the regeneration of the Craigmillar area. Large parts of the listed building are not in use at the moment and have fallen into disrepair. This funding would attract new businesses looking for quality office space into the area, which in turn would have a knock on effect benefitting local shops and other businesses.”

Neil Scott, CEO of Cre8te Opportunities Limited, said: “This is a massive boost for the regeneration of this area.”
Castlebrae Business Centre - formerly Niddrie Marischal Junior Secondary School (1936)
image hosted on flickr
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 17th, 2013, 02:02 PM   #17
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Virgin Money's Edinburgh office listed among UK's coolest offices.



Quote:
Virgin Money's Edinburgh operation centre has an eye-catching sky painted on its ceiling. The new layout secured an award from the British Council for Offices.

The theory is that staring up at the clouds is likely to have a beneficial effect on creativity. Bridges says that to be really creative, a person needs to use their unconscious mind to work on a problem.
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 18th, 2013, 10:57 PM   #18
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Second space now let at Bankhead office development

Edinburgh Reporter - 18th December, 2013



Quote:
Cosmopolitan Investments has secured a second significant letting at Birch House, the company’s office development at Bankhead in West Edinburgh.

The latest tenant is Dialog Semiconductor plc, which already occupies 14,000 sq ft of space at Multrees Walk, adjacent to St Andrew Square in the city centre.

Dialog has taken just under 1,200 sq ft of space on a ten year-lease at an initial rental of £12 a sq ft with a tenant break option after five years.

The letting is a result of expansion by Dialog, who will use the additional space secured at Birch House primarily as a test centre for components such as microchips which eventually form part of tablets and MP3 devices produced by some of the world’s leading consumer electronics companies.

Dialog’s biggest single client is Apple inc. The Stuttgart-based company achieved $774 million in revenues in 2012 and is recognised as one of the fastest-grown public semiconductor companies in Europe.

This deal comes in the wake of a recent letting to Hollander International Systems which has taken 3,480 sq ft of accommodation (the ground floor east suite) on a ten-year lease. This means that Birch House is now 50 per cent let just five months after Cosmopolitan Investments began a marketing campaign to fill space vacated by the previous occupant, Petroleum Geo-Services.

Iain Mercer, group managing director, Cosmopolitan Investments, said: “We began re-marketing Birch House confident that the suites available met an under-supplied part of the market in West Edinburgh, where there are very few sub-2,000 sq ft suites outwith the serviced office sector.

“Although Birch House is geared to provide business and R&D space, its roots lie in development and manufacturing (the building once formed part of the Ethicon surgical sutures factory) so it’s great to have a pioneering and innovative company such as Dialog continue that tradition in the consumer electronics industry.”

Mr Mercer also said that the proximity of Birch House to the tram stop at Bankhead Estate “cannot be underestimated” as it meant that Digital staff will, from next year, be able to transfer between both their Edinburgh offices in under 15 minutes. “Commercial connectivity of this nature will at least be one benefit of the long-awaited tram line.”

Cosmopolitan was represented in both deals by Eric Young and Co and Lambert Smith Hampton.
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 22nd, 2013, 11:44 AM   #19
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4508

Scotsman group seeks new headquarters as Rockstar prepares to move into Barclay House

Sunday Herald - 22nd December, 2013



Quote:
Johnston Press and the Scotsman Publications are to quit their shared home at Barclay House in Edinburgh's Holyrood Road next year, to be replaced as tenants by the world-leading Scottish video games maker Rockstar North.

The Sunday Herald understands that Rockstar, whose latest game Grand Theft Auto V broke records with sales of $800 million (£500m) within 24 hours of its September release, will start moving into the landmark building in 2014, following alterations.

It is understood that the plc and the Scotsman group, whose titles include The Scotsman, Scotland on Sunday and the Evening News, have yet to find new headquarters in the capital.

Industry sources expect Rockstar to sign the new lease agreement with the building's Irish owner Lochlann Quinn before Christmas.

Built at a cost of £20 million and opened by the Queen on St Andrew's Day 1999, the 75,000 sqft building is named after its original owners, the Barclay Brothers, who owned the Scotsman titles between 1995 and 2005.

The building, which has spectacular views of the Salisbury Crags, is part of a cluster of developments built to coincide with the launch of the Scottish Parliament, along with Our Dynamic Earth and The Tun.

It is understood that Edinburgh's CDA, the architect's firm which designed the original building, has been commissioned to adapt it from a modern, open-plan newspaper office into a creative hub for the games giant, currently based in Leith Street in the capital.

The Scotsman group, whose flagship publication was founded in 1817, was acquired in January 2006 from the Barclays' Press Holdings Group in a £160m deal, as part of an aggressive expansion by its present owner, the Edinburgh-based Johnston Press.

The Barclays retained ownership of the building, but sold it less than a year later to the Irish property magnate and former Allied Irish Bank chairman for £25.85m, a 3.95% initial yield.

Shortly after purchasing the Scotsman Group, Johnston Press was caught by the industry-wide advertising and newspaper sales slump, seeing its share price plummet more than 90% by 2011. Shares, which peaked at 566.50p in June 2004, closed on Friday at 14.25p.

Occupied by the newspaper group for less than 15 years, the sandstone and glass building at 108 Holyrood Road is the third in Edinburgh to bear the flagship title's thistle masthead, along with earlier homes in Cockburn Street (1864), and North Bridge (1904).

Irish media reported yesterday that Johnston Press was on the verge of selling its 14 Irish newspapers, ending the company's interest in the Republic.

The titles, including the Kilkenny People and Leinster Leader, were reportedly being sold to Mediaforce for around €8.5 million (£7m), about 97% less than the €300m (£250m) for which they were acquired during the country's ill-fated economic boom.

A spokeswoman for Johnston Press declined to comment on the grounds that "nothing has been signed or agreed, so we have nothing to add".

Neither Neil Gordon of Eric Young and Co, the commercial property consultancy believed to be advising Rockstar, nor Colin Steele of Rapleys, believed to be advising Johnston Press, returned calls from the Sunday Herald last night. Ian Stewart, editor of The Scotsman and Scotland on Sunday, declined to comment.

Rockstar North also failed to respond to messages, as did Frank Hinds, director of architects CDA.
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 22nd, 2013, 12:26 PM   #20
Chris99
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 3,641
Likes (Received): 1487

"Irish media reported yesterday that Johnston Press was on the verge of selling its 14 Irish newspapers..

... reportedly being sold to Mediaforce for around €8.5 million (£7m), about 97% less than the €300m (£250m) for which they were acquired.."

Ouch!
Chris99 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us