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Old September 28th, 2015, 07:29 PM   #1
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Dundas Street/Fettes Row | Canonmills | Planning

Following plans to close city centre offices and relocate staff to Gogarburn, the Royal Bank of Scotland is redeveloping its land at Eyre Terrace, Dundas Street, Fettes Row and Royal Crescent.

The site is currently occupied by two large office complexes from the 70s and 80s, a warehouse, a cleared area formerly occupied by tenements and a large car parking area.

A public consultation is now underway to determine the exact mix of uses, but it is to be residential-led, plus offices (potentially retaining/reusing some existing office space), retail, leisure, and a small to medium sized hotel/aparthotel.

The project supersedes the RBS Eyre Terrace proposal (PPP was granted for a potential mix of uses including residential, office, hotel & care home), which now makes up just a fraction of the wider site.

As with the Eyre Terrace project, the masterplanners are Michael Laird Architects.

Further public consultations are to be held in November and January with a PPP application lodged by January or February.










Last edited by Kenspeckle; September 29th, 2015 at 10:17 AM.
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Old September 28th, 2015, 07:30 PM   #2
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RBS consults on major development site

Broughton Spurtle - 28th September, 2015

Quote:
Royal Bank of Scotland has begun a consultation exercise concerning the future of its properties on Dundas Street, Fettes Row, Royal Crescent, Eyre Place, and Eyre Terrace.

This round of discussions supersedes those held in 2011 and the subsequent application for planning permission in principle (Ref. 14/01177/PPP) for a mixed development of retail, commercial, business, hotel and/or residential and other uses reported here in April 2014.

However, some similar concerns and opportunities are likely to emerge.

The exercise follows the company’s announcement in the spring that it will withdraw staff from its Dundas Street/Fettes Row offices and relocate them to glamorous Gogarburn (see Issue 240).

The potential scale of development is therefore much larger than previously discussed.

On 24 September, an introductory event was held, which comparatively few people attended owing to ineffective publicity.

We are therefore happy to attach the exhibition boards and accompanying questionnaire at the foot of this page. We urge readers to add themselves to the mailing list to avoid missing similar events in future. (Note that the deadline for returned questionnaires in 2 October.)

Planning considerations

Key points which may interest locals include:

• RBS envisages a ‘residential-led’ development here.

• The 2010 Edinburgh City Local Plan (ECLP) defines this ‘urban area’ as suitable in principle for ‘residential, commercial, institutional and other purposes’.

• Under the ECLP, the site of the former tenement on Eyre Place is designated as ‘open space’. Local plan policy Os1 offers protection for this, ‘unless certain criteria are satisfied’.

• Any development of the site must preserve or enhance the special character or appearance of the New Town Conservation Area.

Potential items for a local wish list

The boards currently express a great many fond hopes, noble aspirations, and calls for public input of ideas.

It should not be forgotten, though, that RBS seeks to make a profit. It will therefore be interesting to note how warmly they respond to any calls for additional affordable housing or New Town-style spacious shared gardens.

In completing the questionnaire, locals may wish to repeat their desire for a development that does not loom menacingly over the adjacent King George V Park. A stepped-back approach would be preferable.

RBS will almost certainly seek to build on the Eyre Place open space mentioned above. Locals might therefore ask to be compensated for this loss by the addition elsewhere of a similar sized or even larger open space contiguous to King George V Park.

Previous rounds of discussion have emphasised a need to make any development here ‘porous’, with welcoming through-routes for pedestrians. This would also be desirable in future iterations.

Given the site’s central location and excellent bus and bicycle links, perhaps strict limits should be placed on the amount of car parking.


Download exhibition boards (pdf) from first consultation event at the link.
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Old September 29th, 2015, 12:22 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
RBS consults on major development site

Broughton Spurtle - 28th September, 2015
That is a big old site and no mistake. Prime site and would love to see a Quartermile quality approach although the site height differentials to the streets pose a bit of a challenge to creating a sense of district.

I must admit, I have a slight soft spot architecturally for the pyramidal simplicity of the original Dundas house. A temple to the new age of the IT function when built. But it is a beast squatting at the heart of the site that could hinder attempts to create a really interesting masterplan.
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Old November 4th, 2015, 10:32 AM   #4
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PAN submitted.

15/05024/PAN | Residential and mixed use development, including class 1 (shops), class 2 (financial profesional and other services), class 3 (food and drink) class 4 (business), Hotel class 7 and/or Care Home Class 8 and ancillary works. | 34 Fettes Row 7, 11 And 13 Eyre Terrace Edinburgh EH3 6RH

Second public consultation details:

Quote:
Thursday 26 November 2015 (3pm - 8pm)

Broughton St Mary's Parish Church
12 Bellvue Crescent
Edinburgh
EH3 6NE
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Old November 4th, 2015, 01:08 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
PAN submitted.

15/05024/PAN | Residential and mixed use development, including class 1 (shops), class 2 (financial profesional and other services), class 3 (food and drink) class 4 (business), Hotel class 7 and/or Care Home Class 8 and ancillary works. | 34 Fettes Row 7, 11 And 13 Eyre Terrace Edinburgh EH3 6RH

Second public consultation details:
Agree with the idea of residential led but I would like to see a genuinely good mix of uses - with office and hotel as part of that. Tanfield and Quartermile shows there is a market for offices a bit further from the core/rail stations.

And how about a park-like strip extension of King George V Park all the way to Dundas St? It's a slightly hidden and secreted away little park but is well connected into the old railway cycle routes via the tunnel to Tesco's - but you then exit awakwardly onto cobbled streets in eyre pl etc.

A gradient ramp of some sort and some kind of strip park leading up to Dundas St could be a real winner and encourage a lot more park usage generally and also a lot more cycle linkage.

In NY recently and very impressed by the Highline park on the old elevated rail line. Strip parks rock!

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=hi...KJAKmg&dpr=1.1
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Old November 4th, 2015, 04:42 PM   #6
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The architect of the RBS Data Centre was James Latimer, a real gent with an interesting life story and career worth checking out

http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk....php?id=400346

I think his bio has been edited as where it glosses "However, there were tensions within the Laird partnership and Latimer left the firm" it used to relate that Laird was livid that the RBS credited Latimer with the success of the project and lauded him at an official reception dinner.

I remember being really excited as a child when the building was finished as it was like something out of an American film.
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Old November 4th, 2015, 04:46 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dadabouttown View Post

In NY recently and very impressed by the Highline park on the old elevated rail line. Strip parks rock!

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=hi...KJAKmg&dpr=1.1
I like the Highline's landscaping and concept but it's been a highline to supergentrification for lower Manhattan with the starchitects falling over themselves to build next to it. Not that Eyre Place is in any way comparable to the Meatpacking District #ifonly.
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Old November 27th, 2015, 07:27 PM   #8
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Some exhibition boards from yesterday's public consultation and the Spurtle's summary of the event.




















First airing for 'parkland' development plans

Broughton Spurtle - 27th November, 2015

Quote:
Landmark buildings at 113 Dundas Street and 34 Fettes Row look set to disappear under outline plans for a major new development here on land owned by the Royal Bank of Scotland.

The proposals were aired yesterday in the second of three public exhibitions featuring designs by development consultants GVA and Michael Laird Architects. All the display boards will eventually appear at the foot of this article.

The ‘ziggurat’ data centre at the corner of Fettes Row would be replaced by three south-facing residential blocks set back and screened by the trees which already line the street. They would be either five or six storeys high.

Similarly, another five residential blocks would rise from today’s car park, matching the curve of Royal Crescent. These too would be up to six storeys high, although we understand the two opposite Dundonald Street might be lower to help preserve what would remain of the view northwards.

A raised footpath and cycleway in front of these new buildings would connect the foot of Scotland Street to Dundas Street, with four access points to the street along the way.

Beyond these blocks would be smaller residential structures, with some being relatively low in order to prevent a sense of looming presence over the adjacent King George V Park. These are the most likely to be earmarked for the obligatory 25% affordable housing component of the development.

‘Rather than a continuation of urban blocks,’ reads one of the display boards, ‘we see the potential to create a parkland setting with stand alone building plots with spaces, routes and landscaping that flow between the buildings’.

Mixed use and ground floor commercial

A new rectangular layout is envisaged for that part of the site bounded on three sides by the park, Eyre Place and Eyre Terrace. This could comprise mixed uses (residential, hotel, office and/or care home) with ground-floor commercial uses fronting Eyre Place.

Outline planning permission for such uses already exists, as reported here in Breaking news (8.4.14; 14/01177/PPP). One may therefore surmise that earlier plans for a tall structural statement or ‘end-point’ at the north-east angle have also been retained in developers’ thinking here.

A north–south footway starting beside this block would link Eyre Place to Royal Crescent.

Another hollow rectangle would occupy space at the lower end of Dundas Street and south of Eyre Place. This would again comprise ground-floor commercial and mixed uses.

In total, around 400 residential units are proposed, of which 100 would be affordable housing.

Access and public spaces

Vehicular access into and out of the development would be principally along Eyre Terrace, with all parking provided on-site and underground. Short points of approach, for emergency vehicles, would be available from Fettes Row and Royal Crescent.

Four transitional public spaces are envisaged: an ‘urban square’ off Dundas Street; a courtyard between the housing and the south-west corner of the park; an ‘entrance square’ opposite the bottom of Dundonald Street; and a ‘pocket park’ roughly at the foot of the path leading down from the north end of Scotland Street.

Reactions: the down side

The outline plans have sparked immediate alarm among some residents of Fettes Row and Royal Crescent who:

• fear damage to their property by pile-driving during construction, and potential drainage and landslip problems later
• dislike the prospect of being overlooked by anyone except faceless computer personnel and wildlife
• are concerned about overshadowing by new and higher residential blocks opposite.

GVA representatives say any such loss of light would be within tolerable and legally established margins, and that the buildings in question would be appropriately 'stepped back'.

The height of these residential blocks is a compromise, they say. The choice facing developers is between a continuous lower-level block or several higher blocks punctuated by green spaces in-between. (Several lower blocks appears not to be an option.)

Spurtle spoke to one Jeremiah who expressed a mixture of disappointment and disgust at the ‘bland’ and ‘boring’ style of development visualised here. He said it was the Ubiquitous Vernacular of Nowhere, favoured by developers as a way of not frightening Planning departments. It has, he argues, nothing to say about its immediate setting or Edinburgh or Scotland in general.

Spurtle spoke to or eavesdropped on others who criticised some of the visualisations for conveying an overly optimistic sense of horizontal space and openness, particularly along Fettes Row.

Doubts remain about the extent to which King George V Park may come to feel enclosed, shut away from its current long views south.

Despite the developers' protestations, doubts were expressed about the loss of long views north, and the sense of dramatic sloping topography. (In fairness, many of these views may be available to elevated residents, but are not to pedestrians on Fettes Row and Royal Crescent.)

Grounds for optimism

Public reaction was by no means all bad. In fact, a lot of it was very good if less passionately expressed by those who felt they had something to gain rather than much to lose.

Spurtle heard approval for the consultation process so far, and appreciation that summaries on display were a fair representation of local sentiment. GVA certainly should have a handle on things, since its staff have been soliciting opinions in the area since January 2012 (Breaking news, 12.1.12).

We heard approval for the amount of green space in the proposal, and the permeability (in fact, often more visual than actual) between park and housing.

Those we spoke to during and after the event liked the proposals aspirations for ‘parkland’ and ‘flow’, although were sceptical about the extent to which this could be realised in practice.

There was approval for the retention of trees along the development’s southern boundary.

We heard positive remarks about a ‘green corridor’ running east-west through the middle of the site, and the potential for views along it. There was also appreciation for the retention of south–north views across the site.

There were pockets of amusement at the repeated inclusion in visualisations of one character who seemed to be wandering around in search of lost sheep.

What next?

Send in your comments by 4 December to: GVA James Barr, Quayside House, 127 Fountainbridge, Edinburgh EH3 9QG. When GVA have had a chance to collate and build upon feedback, a third consultation event will be held at a date yet to be confirmed. Any such remarks are not representations to the City of Edinburgh Council – such an opportunity will arise only when a formal planning application has been submitted.

Full exhibition boards and questionnaire at the bottom of this link.
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Old February 18th, 2016, 12:27 PM   #9
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The third and final consultation event is to be held on Thursday 25th February at Broughton St Mary’s Parish Church, 12 Bellevue Crescent, Edinburgh, EH3 6NE, between 3pm and 8pm.
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Old February 27th, 2016, 10:53 AM   #10
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Some images from the final public consultation. They are keeping their options open, with a range of possible uses across the site (hotel, retail, office, F&B) and approximately 350 homes.

The developers hope to submit a PPP application in April.















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Old March 27th, 2016, 10:40 AM   #11
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Campaign to save ground of forgotten club St Bernard’s

The Scotsman - 26th March, 2016

Quote:
It flickered briefly as a leading light in Scottish football, rivalling Hearts and Hibs for bragging rights in the capital.

But now, a grassroots campaign is gearing up to save the former home of a long disbanded Scottish Cup-winning football club.

The name of St Bernard’s FC – in their time, known as the Saints – may be unknown to modern day supporters, but the Edinburgh club was once a force to be reckoned with.

Its victory in a Scottish Cup final at the tail end of the 19th century earned it a place in the record books, though its success didn’t last long.

What was once its ground has long been used as a car park for a Royal Bank of Scotland data centre. With the bank planning to close the offices at Dundas Street, Fettes Row and Royal Crescent it has been earmarked for a residential development.

However, community groups are urging RBS to donate the site to the City of Edinburgh Council so that St Bernard’s proud heritage can be safeguarded, and in doing so create a cherished open space in the heart of the New Town.

A clutch of famous players turned out in the blue and white of St Bernard’s over its 65-year history, including Scotland international, Mark Bell, Peter Simpson, the Crystal Palace striker, and Chelsea winger, Willie Ferguson.

The club’s annus mirabilis was 1895, when it defeated Renton 2-1 to claim the Scottish Cup at Ibrox. The team were carried shoulder-high back to their train, with large crowds gathered at Waverley Station joining in the celebrations.

The triumph, however, marked the beginning of the end for St Bernard’s. The following season, its stars were snapped up by rival clubs.

Despite a run to the semi-finals of the Scottish Cup in 1938, it played out its final years in the second division before being forced to sell off its ground in 1943. David Price, a retired architect and planner, believes the side deserve to be better known in Scottish football circles. “There are information boards around the edge of King George V park which mention the history of St Bernard’s, but I’m not sure how many people read them,” he explained. “It has a small but important place in the Scottish game.”

A founder member of the Drummond Civic Association, Price is part of the group urging RBS to donate the car park to the City of Edinburgh Council.

RBS intends to apply to the local authority for planning permission for a mixed use development that would include around 350 flats.

These have been described as “coffin shaped” buildings that would “bear down brutally” by another group of residents, the Friends of King George V and Scotland Yard Parks.


Read more: http://www.scotsman.com/heritage/cam...#ixzz445gsvWS0
Follow us: @TheScotsman on Twitter | TheScotsmanNewspaper on Facebook
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Old March 27th, 2016, 10:56 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
Campaign to save ground of forgotten club St Bernard’s

The Scotsman - 26th March, 2016
Good luck with that! RBS have too much juice in Edinburgh and too much debt to give away prime time land to people who seem to have never taken much interest in the heritage of the site.
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Old October 3rd, 2016, 10:45 AM   #13
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Based on meetings between the developer and New Town & Broughton Community Council, the Broughton Spurtle has a description of the likely proposal ahead of the PPP application (expected later this month):

Quote:
• 400 units, 525 concealed parking spaces, access only via Eyre Terrace. Residential and widest possible range of mixed uses. Aim is to establish size and massing, and to maximise the value of the site before sale.

• Eight slightly shallower blocks for Fettes Row and Royal Crescent, with the gap between them widened at Dundonald Street to improve view. No reduction in height.

• Easternmost block at foot of Scotland Street closer than before to King George V Park. Elsewhere, boundary with KGV Park softened with an accessible crescent.

• Eyre Terrace block (4–5 storeys) slightly less deep and more open.

RBS’s plan will establish the big picture. All details will have to be gone through again when the site is sold and a new developer brings forward its own proposals.
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Old October 3rd, 2016, 11:57 AM   #14
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if a see more modernist brick cubes here I will spew! end of. Something different PLEASE!!
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Old November 11th, 2016, 08:29 PM   #15
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PPP submitted by Michael Laird Architects for RBS.

16/05454/PPP | Demolition and residential-led mixed use redevelopment comprising Residential; Retail (Class 1); Financial, professional & other services (Class 2); Food & drink (Class 3); Business (Class 4); Hotel/Class 7; Care Home (Class 8); car parking, access & other associated works; detailed approval of the siting & maximum height of building blocks; landscaping strategy; location of principal pedestrian/cycle routes and points of pedestrian & vehicular access/egress. | 34 Fettes Row, 7,11,13 Eyre Terrace Edinburgh EH3 6RH

Quote:
The proposals include:

• 47,450m2 of development including potential for residential, retail, hotel, care home, food & drink and office. Affordable housing will have to be provided to meet CEC’s affordable housing policy. The maximum no of residential properties would be 400 units.

• Buildings along southern edge are set back and stepped from boundary in order to retain existing mature trees and reduce impact on street. Development split into separate stand-alone blocks with landscaping between to allow for views through the site and greater spatial connections. New buildings set back a full 28m from Fettes Row building line.

• Buildings to northern side of site connect and repair existing adjacent urban blocks with corresponding massing.

• New level pedestrian and cycle route through trees along Fettes Row connecting to King George V Park and cycle network.

• Direct connection through site off Dundas Street to King George V Park.

• Re-instatement of existing pedestrian connection via Royal Crescent through existing archway in historic stone retaining wall. Connection to link to public external space and direct access to King George V Park.

• New planted private and public landscaped spaces throughout.

• Parking for all potential uses contained within hidden undercroft parking.










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Old November 11th, 2016, 11:52 PM   #16
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Renders: Gone are the days of children with balloons, now they depict people checking their phones.
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Old December 22nd, 2016, 09:16 AM   #17
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I wonder if the Cockburn Association think the existing buildings and car parks "result in unacceptable damage to the setting of the internationally significant World Heritage Site, the New Town Garden and Designed Landscape, listed buildings, the New Town Conservation Area, the local character, environmental quality and the residential amenity of the site"?

RBS hotel and flats plan will damage World Heritage Site setting, says watchdog

The Herald - 22nd December 2016

Quote:
A Heritage watchdog has criticised a Royal Bank of Scotland hotel and homes plan for the Scottish capital, claiming it inflicts "unacceptable damage to the setting of the World Heritage Site" which it borders.

The Cockburn Association is one of hundreds to object to the RBS plan for Dundas Street in the New Town when it vacates the site next year, calling on Edinburgh City Council to reject the proposal.

The bank's plans received 452 comments, 445 of which were objections, three in support and the rest non-defined.

The Cockburn Association also said the plans for the site that sits between Eyre Place and Fettes Row conflict with key local heritage policies and affect the ambience of King George V Park which the new buildings would also overlook.

The association said that "the quantum of the current proposals would result in unacceptable damage to the setting of the internationally significant World Heritage Site, the New Town Garden and Designed Landscape, listed buildings, the New Town Conservation Area, the local character, environmental quality and the residential amenity of the site".

Association director Marion Williams said that the "proposed density is too much for the site and we would urge a reduction in quantum and advocate a more sensitive and sustainable approach to this brownfield site".

She said: "We are concerned that the amenity and ‘sense of place’ of the public park adjacent to the site will be negatively impacted."

The plan also includes shops, food and drink outlets, offices and a care home.

A spokeswoman for RBS said it is "giving full and careful consideration of the impact of the development in the preparation of the proposals" and "ultimately we will look to sell the site and buildings to developers who can realise the site’s potential, in line with planning guidelines".
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Old December 22nd, 2016, 12:11 PM   #18
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Quite. My first impression of the plans was the 'quantum' of development was less than might have been. They could easily have proposed a continuous or semi continuous frontage to Fettes Row rather than a series of individual buildings that open up the site.

And as for the park's sense of place being lost I just find that bizarre. Parks can be overlooked and have scale on their doorstep - err...Meadows, Princes St Gardens, Central Park....

I suspect the greater permeability will energise the park which I used a bit when my kids were little and fancied a change of scene, not to mention the giant hill slide. It was a bit of a hidden and IMHO under utilised gem and I suspect sub consciously the CA would like to see it stay that way rather than have a bunch of incomers start bringing their kids in!
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Old December 24th, 2016, 02:43 PM   #19
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Some mischief from EEN with a headline implying the RBS workforce is being cut rather than relocated to Gogarburn. If only they'd taken this approach with Waterfront Plaza - Plans for CALA flats 'will cost city 7,500 jobs'...

Plans to turn RBS office into flats ‘will cost city 2000 jobs’

Edinburgh Evening News - 24th December 2016

Quote:
Vital office space for up to 2000 jobs could be lost under controversial plans to redevelop a key site on the edge of the New Town, council officials have warned.

Royal Bank of Scotland wants permission to demolish its premises at Dundas Street and Fettes Row to make way for a residential-led development of up to 400 flats.

The application also proposes a hotel, care home, shops and restaurants.

But although offices are included as a possible element of the scheme, the outline plans would also allow for no offices at all.

And the council’s city strategy and economy department is recommending that planners set a minimum amount of office space which would be required on the site.

In a submission, the department said the existing RBS “Fettes campus” was the 12th largest office site in Edinburgh and if fully let could support up to 1986 full-time equivalent jobs, worth millions of pounds to the economy.

If the proposed redevelopment went ahead, then a “worst case scenario” of no offices being included could mean just 215 jobs from the other uses which form part of the redevelopment of the site, it said.

The submission added: “There is a growing pressure on office space in Edinburgh due to a combination of steady demand, limited new development and the loss of older space.

“The demolition of the Fettes campus represents the loss of a significant quantum of office space.”

RBS is vacating the offices to move staff out to its headquarters at Gogarburn.

The proposed redevelopment in Dundas Street would involve ten blocks – the first two would be office, hotel or residential, another two would be residential or office and the rest would be residential.

Resident Judith Symes, of Fettes Row, argued demolition of the current buildings should not be allowed. She said: “Edinburgh is short of high quality office space and that’s exactly what is there just now. It seems insane to knock it down. People think this is an opportunity to retain high quality jobs in the area.”

And Dorothy Hogg, of the Fettes Row and Royal Crescent Association, said: “They are perfectly good buildings and it seems ludicrous they cannot be retained when Edinburgh is trying to develop its walk-to-work opportunities for people.

“There is a lot of retail around here that survives on these offices and would not be here without them.”

Objectors have collected around 750 signatures on a petition against the development and the proposals have attracted more than 450 comments on the council’s planning website.

Historic Environment Scotland has objected to the scale and layout of the development as proposed, arguing it would have an adverse impact on the World Heritage Site.

An RBS spokeswoman said: “We announced last year our intention to vacate the Fettes and Dundas site.

We have now engaged specialist advisors to work with us to explore the development opportunities for the site. “We are giving full and careful consideration of the impact of the development in the preparation of the proposals. Ultimately we will look to sell the site and buildings to developers who can realise the site’s potential, in line with planning guidelines.”


Read more at: http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.co...jobs-1-4325339

Leader comment: Balance between offices and houses must be struck

Quote:
The debate around what should happen with the Royal Bank of Scotland’s premises at Dundas Street and Fettes Row raises some fundamental questions for the city planners and councillors to consider.

At the outset let us make it clear that no decisions have been taken on exactly what should happen to the current office buildings, and that there are various options around how much office space should remain. It should also be remembered that the bank has its own challenges, and it obviously makes sense for it to raise as much money as it can for these premises which it no longer needs, which is why it will sell to a developer.

Edinburgh house prices are high, the New Town particularly carries a premium, so it would be easy to see why that would be attractive to developers. And of course there is great demand for housing in Edinburgh.

But there is a bit of chicken-and-egg here, because there is only that demand because it is fuelled by employment. Arguably people need places of work first before they start looking for a home.

And there is already great demand for offices in Edinburgh. In fact the council’s city strategy and economy department says: “There is a growing pressure on office space in Edinburgh due to a combination of steady demand, limited new development and the loss of older space”.

There are a lot of houses in the New Town, which have been converted for office use many years ago, which are now being reconverted to residential developments, adding to the pressure for office space.

At the Dundas Street site there is also the question of what would happen to the retailers in the area who only exist to service the needs of the office workers. It would seem sensible for planners to set a minimum amount of office space which would be required on the site to ensure a decent balance.


Read more at: http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.co...ruck-1-4325067
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Old December 24th, 2016, 04:44 PM   #20
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I think you are being very charitable to describe it as 'some mischief'!
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