National Collections Facility (NCF) | Granton | £75m | Proposed - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > Scottish Architecture Forum > Edinburgh

Edinburgh Architecture in and around Scotland's capital.


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old June 24th, 2015, 11:41 PM   #1
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

National Collections Facility (NCF) | Granton | £75m | Proposed

Interesting to learn of the Scottish Government's plans for an adjacent site. I'm guessing this is the land to the west?

National Museum of Scotland’s Granton storage move

The Scotsman - 23rd June, 2015

Quote:
It is a little-known corner of Edinburgh’s waterfront that is gradually being turned into a national treasure trove.

Some 12 million items have brought together over the last decade at a nondescript-looking industrial estate in the Granton area that was opened this morning.

A new hub created by the National Museums Scotland is expected to provide a model for the future by combining the best-quality storage facilities with space for international research to be carried out and exhibitions created.

Some £25 million has now been spent in the last 10 years to bring collections stored across five different sites, including the national museum on Chambers Street, into one place.

But a number of post-war buildings on the site are already earmarked for demolition and a large parcel of land has just been secured by the Scottish Government to accommodate a further expansion of storage and research facilities.

The National Galleries of Scotland, which already has one building at the site, and Historic Environment Scotland, the new body being formed out of the merger of Historic Scotland and royal commission RCAHMS are both expected to create new facilities there, along with NMS.

The £12 million facility at Granton - officially unveiled by Scottish culture secretary Fiona Hyslop - has enabled the museums body to move out of two long-time storage facilities, at a former First World War naval hospital near South Queensferry and a historic customs house in Leith.

The first museums storage facilities were created in 1972 at the Granton site, which still boasts buildings dating back to the 1940s, when it opened up as a training centre for ex-servicemen.

Dr Gordon Rintoul, director of NMS, said: “We’ve been redeveloping this particular site for the past decade. We’ve created three new buildings at a cost of £25 million.

“We used to have five different storage sites and with the creation of this building we’ve been able to realise the ambition of having everything on a single site.

“There are obviously huge benefits in terms of reducing our operational costs, access for the public, and our staff being able to use the collections much more easily.

“We have 12 million items here now, which makes it the biggest collection centre in the country by a long way. But we’ve also got much more work to do as we still have a lot of old buildings on the site, which will be demolished and replaced.

“The key thing is this building will serve as a model for planned further facilities, where we will combine storage with access for researchers and public access from time to time on conducted tours.

“Crucially, we need space so that we can tour our exhibitions nationally and internationally. At the moment we just don’t have anywhere where we can put things together from our different stores, put them together, crate them up and ship them off somewhere.

“Our site covers 10 acres and the Scottish Government has recently purchased an area a bit smaller than that right next door. The three cultural organisations are now looking at potential synergies between all the activities. Clearly it would a massive collection centre. By working together hopefully we will be able to achieve a lot more than working independently.”

Ms Hylsop, who was given a guided tour of the new three-storey building, said: “The Scottish Government values our culture and heritage. It would be unforgiveable if we did not look after our most precious objects.

“I visited the storage facilities at Port Edgar and Leith Customs House, which were not fit for purpose for a country which should be world-leading when it comes to conservation and research.

“An important aspect of this project is how much easier it now is to see things. There will be designated days for the public to come in and visit and a lot of the initial visits will be from international researchers.

“We’re looking at the whole quarter down here. This is a really important statement to have all this culture and heritage in Granton. There are options in terms of the room for manoeuvre and expansion in the area.”
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old June 25th, 2015, 11:22 AM   #2
dadabouttown
Registered User
 
dadabouttown's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,065
Likes (Received): 870

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
Interesting to learn of the Scottish Government's plans for an adjacent site. I'm guessing this is the land to the west?

National Museum of Scotland’s Granton storage move

The Scotsman - 23rd June, 2015
The area to the west would make sense and who knows, probably pie in the sky but could include the Granton Gasworks railway station building. That could be a brilliant visitor centre for the collections - much rather see it get some tlc and become that than some chain family pub eatery.
dadabouttown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 25th, 2015, 04:24 PM   #3
Southpaw~
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 4
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by dadabouttown View Post
The area to the west would make sense and who knows, probably pie in the sky but could include the Granton Gasworks railway station building. That could be a brilliant visitor centre for the collections - much rather see it get some tlc and become that than some chain family pub eatery.

I believe the land between the current National Museums Collection Centre and Waterfront Avenue was earmarked for further expansion. The land to the east of this and Madelvic car factory building had been set aside for flats/house but it looks like that is not going ahead, maybe this will be used for the expansion of the Collection Centre. Would be nice if they actually have a facility for exhibitions instead of just storage though.
Southpaw~ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old August 12th, 2015, 05:31 PM   #4
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

Application submitted for the next phase of the National Museum Collection Centre masterplan - alterations and extension to an existing building beside West Granton Road by Hypostyle Architects.

15/03296/FUL | Proposed extension to the east facade of building 1 (on the NMS site), comprising of a 2-storey extension with a rear single storey plantroom. | 242 West Granton Road Edinburgh EH5 1JA



Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 6th, 2016, 05:36 PM   #5
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

A bit more detail on the National Galleries of Scotland's National Collections Facility project at Granton.

Quote:
National Collections Facility

The National Collections Facility project seeks to safeguard the future of our renowned national collection.

Through the National Collection Facility project we have the opportunity of a lifetime to create a purpose-built facility in Granton that will allow us to achieve all of these aims. The facility will be a place where we look after our country’s greatest art. This entirely new centre will deliver world-class services for staff, researchers and visitors. It will provide state-of-the-art spaces for conservation and study, as well as the management and distribution of Scotland’s art.


The proposed site for the National Collection Facility at Granton

The Location

The National Galleries of Scotland plan to redevelop the indicated site at Granton as the location of its new facility. This site, within the bounds of the Central Development Area of the Edinburgh Waterfront regeneration project, currently lies empty. The B-listed Madelvic car factory is at the eastern edge of the site. Madelvic House is immediately to the east. The southern edge of the site is formed by retail units accommodating Lidl and Iceland. To the north of the site are the Places for People and Wimpey residential developments.

The facility will be a substantial high-profile development for this area and will contribute to regeneration by expanding social amenities, encouraging employment, enhancing cultural activity, and providing an economic stimulus.

A Collection for Everyone

The new facility will make it possible for everyone to explore, discover, and engage with the national collection. The facility offers an additional 14,000m² of quality space – the equivalent of two good-sized playing fields – on the area currently available. This allows us to make the collection more accessible to the public than ever before.

Alongside a vastly improved digital offering, the facility will offer a modern environment in which students, researchers and members of the public can study the collection. Amenities such as publicly-accessible libraries and research rooms, exhibition spaces, and external sculpture trails could all contribute towards opening the collection up to everyone.

Caring for the Collection

The facility offers enough quality space and security to provide a permanent home for the national collection.

It will support the expansion of the collection over the next two decades and beyond.

The facility will also provide modern studios for conservation and research.

A Home from Home

The facility will be an attractive environment in which to spend time, with appropriate social spaces and amenities for visitors’ comfort and enjoyment.

There will be an opportunity to enliven the surrounding landscape with a variety of soft planting, sheltered spaces, ponds and pools.

The facility will be designed on Passivhaus principles. As Passivhaus is the world’s most rigorous energy and comfort standard, this development, one of the largest Passivhaus buildings in the world, and will undoubtedly attract global attention.
Quote:
We are keen to hear your thoughts on the proposed National Collections Facility at Granton. We would encourage you to complete our online survey. For more background information, read our project introduction page.

You are also welcome to join us at one of our consultation events. Drop-in public consultations take place at:

Madelvic House
Granton Park Avenue
Edinburgh
EH5 1HS

11am–4pm on Saturday 5 March 2016
2pm–8pm on Tuesday 8 March 2016

If you have any questions please get in contact with us. You can e-mail [email protected] or call 0131 624 6200.
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2016, 10:46 AM   #6
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

National Gallery bid to create waterfront complex

The Scotsman - 9th March, 2016

Quote:
A huge new treasure trove to care for Scotland’s finest works of art is to be created on Edinburgh’s waterfront – to help “safeguard the future” of centuries of paintings, drawings and sculpture.

The National Galleries of Scotland, which cares for the country’s most significant collection of art, is pursuing plans for a multi-million pound complex after being donated a parcel of land by the Scottish Government.

The organisation says it has been given the “opportunity of a lifetime” to create a world-class purpose-built archive, conservation and research centre close to the site of the former Granton gasworks.

People of all ages would be encouraged to visit the new National Collections Facility to learn about and explore highlights from the collection, access to which is highly restricted at the moment.

The National Galleries of Scotland, which has three major attractions in Edinburgh, is responsible for almost 100,000 works dating from the early Renaissance period to the present day.

Scottish artists represented include Allan Ramsay, Sir Henry Raeburn, John Bellany, Joan Eardley, Eduardo Paolozzi, Francis Cadell, Alison Watt and John Byrne.

However its collections are stored in various sites, including a facility at the National Gallery of Modern Art and a small centre in Granton, close to where the National Museum of Scotland opened a new £12 million facility last year.

The unused site – close to the listed former Granton gas tower and Edinburgh College’s campus – earmarked for the new development includes the remains of the oldest purpose-built car factory in the UK, which has been previously been earmarked for demolition, but could now be saved.
Galleries chiefs have been exploring the possibility of new facility in the area for around a year and a half. It has recently acquired the sit and plans to lodge a planning application for the new facility by the end of the year.

The centre would be the next major project for the organisation following the planned completion of work to overhaul and extend the Scottish National Gallery in 2018.

The galleries collections centre is being planned after a decade-long operation by the National Museum of Scotland to bring together around 12 million items onto the one site at an adjacent site it has occupied in Granton since 1972.

Patricia Convery, director of audience engagement at NGS, said: “We’ve been grappling for some time with trying to sort out the future of our collections, including the storage of it, how we maintain and provide access to the public.

“We have an art store in Granton at the moment, but it’s really quite small compared to what we need now. The rest of the collection is in pockets around the city. We need much more space and really want to do a lot more with the collection as well.”

John Leighton, director-general of the National Galleries, said: “Anew National Collections Facility will provide first-rate conditions not just for looking after our collection but also for researching it and sharing it more widely. It will also greatly reduce our overall energy usage and costs and will allow us to work with the community to create a positive future for the local area.”

Mark Harris, senior development manager at the EDI Group, which is overseeing the Granton waterfront regeneration, said: “This development will have a significant impact on the wider regeneration of the area creating jobs and attracting further investment opportunities, as well as providing a cultural destination for people to visit and enjoy.”


Read more: http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/cu...#ixzz42OiCQV6n
Follow us: @TheScotsman on Twitter | TheScotsmanNewspaper on Facebook
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2016, 11:57 AM   #7
dadabouttown
Registered User
 
dadabouttown's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,065
Likes (Received): 870

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
National Gallery bid to create waterfront complex

The Scotsman - 9th March, 2016
I must admit that when I first heard about the proposals, I thought that the NGS and NMS were looking at a joint, enlarged and enhanced facility - where some economies of scale could be realised - e.g. a joint visitor centre that would be a bigger scale and draw. It also fits in with the SG tenor of looking for centralising / merger savings opportunities - e.g. Historic Environment Scotland etc.

The diagram in the earlier post and this release makes it look more like 2 very similar operations - on adjoining plots but having no connection or interaction. Bit dissapointed if this proves to be the case. I'm sure much of the operations there have to remain separate but there must be common needs in the staff needed for conserving, restoring and storing historic artifacts and paintings - in plant and equipment etc - and as I've said in a joint, bigger and better visitor centre.
dadabouttown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2016, 02:03 PM   #8
Intrepid121
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 283
Likes (Received): 116

Quote:
Originally Posted by dadabouttown View Post
I must admit that when I first heard about the proposals, I thought that the NGS and NMS were looking at a joint, enlarged and enhanced facility - where some economies of scale could be realised - e.g. a joint visitor centre that would be a bigger scale and draw. It also fits in with the SG tenor of looking for centralising / merger savings opportunities - e.g. Historic Environment Scotland etc.

The diagram in the earlier post and this release makes it look more like 2 very similar operations - on adjoining plots but having no connection or interaction. Bit disjointed if this proves to be the case. I'm sure much of the operations there have to remain separate but there must be common needs in the staff needed for conserving, restoring and storing historic artifacts and paintings - in plant and equipment etc - and as I've said in a joint, bigger and better visitor centre.
Joined up thinking, or lack thereof is my major frustration.

The shed of a cruise boat terminal is crying out to get replaced by something with that better serves tourists, and could easily host a museum \ exhibition space that embraces Leith rich history with the sea.

And like you say, having multiple joined up efforts, rather than one offs, it will make the whole thing so much better.

It's indicative of the big picture at the moment, and I feel this opportunity to make Leith world class is slipping into mediocre without serious pressure being applied.
Intrepid121 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2016, 10:36 AM   #9
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

A place brief (pdf) for the National Collections Facility development at Granton was presented for approval to the council's Planning Committee yesterday. Still no news about the appointment of an architect yet.

Image below shows the emerging placemaking principles for the development - I like that the main entrance will be off The Walk rather than buried within the site.

__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2016, 07:14 PM   #10
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

Construction starts on £3.5m museum collection centre

Urban Realm - 2nd December 2016



Quote:
National Museums Scotland have kick-started construction of a £3.5m collections centre in north Edinburgh which will provide an additional 1,000sq/m of specialist research and storage space.

The National Museums Collection Centre will is expected to begin operation in October 2017, providing enhanced facilities for the scientific study, conservation and research of over 12m historic items.

Specific services include a conservation science centre and improved accommodation for a variety of geological collections, textiles and artefacts in addition to space for staff and researchers.

Dr Gordon Rintoul, director of National Museums Scotland said: “This new development will greatly enhance its capacity and usage as a vibrant and active hub for research, interdisciplinary study, and specialist training, providing access to material and knowledge for researchers from around the world. It will also provide vital support for our public programmes, both in our museums and our wider national and international activities”.

The project design team includes Hypostyle Architects, Ogilvie Construction, Ailsa TH project management and Thomson Gray Ltd Cost Consultants.
__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC

Terra_ liked this post
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 13th, 2016, 05:48 PM   #11
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

National Galleries of Scotland seeks architect for £75m Passivhaus archive

The Architects' Journal - 13th December 2016

Quote:
The National Galleries of Scotland (NGS) is on the hunt for an architect to design a £75 million archive in Granton, north-east Edinburgh

The winning architect-led multidisciplinary design team will draw up plans for a landmark 30,000m² National Collections Facility on a waterfront site within the city’s brownfield regeneration zone.

The project will create a new publicly accessible Passivhaus store for more than 100,000 of the museum’s artworks, including paintings, sculpture, photography and print material. It is planned to complete in 2021.

The brief says the facility ‘offers an extraordinary opportunity to make our collection work hard all the time, not just when it’s on display in the galleries or on tour. We want the NCF [National Collections Facility] to be a game changer – a place where anything is possible.

‘The building, through its design and construction, will be a hub for high-quality care, and the effective management and distribution of the collections. This will transform public access, and, together with our partners, we will deliver an international and national presence for research and education. It will be an exemplar of high energy and efficiency underpinned by the rigour of the Passivhaus building standard.’

The facility will be constructed on a 4.5ha site which was formerly home to the Madelvic Motor Carriage Company and features one surviving Category B-listed building. Owned by city astronomer William Peck, the company produced an electric car powered by a fifth wheel in 1898.

Nearby landmarks within the waterfront regeneration area include BDP’s 1,300m² Granton Centre for Art, completed for NGS in 2003, and the Hoskins Architects-masterplanned National Museums Collection Centre which houses 12 million items from National Museums Scotland.

The latest commission comes two years after Hoskins Architects was appointed by NGS for a £15.3 million refurbishment of its main venue on The Mound in central Edinburgh.

Once complete the new NCF building will bring together the collections of the National Galleries of Scotland, the Royal Scottish Academy, the Demarco Archive and the Artist Rooms all under one roof.

Participating teams should include an architect as lead consultant, civil and structural engineer, services engineer, principal designer and landscape architect. Applicants should have experience of place-making, consultation with stakeholders, BIM, Passivhaus and delivering intelligent solutions to complex storage, access, security and distribution requirements.

Up to five teams will be shortlisted for the contract, which is expected to run for five years. Bidders must have £10 million worth of employer’s liability insurance cover, £10 million of public liability insurance and £10 million of professional indemnity insurance. A minimum annual turnover of at least £700,000 for the past three years is also required.

The deadline for applications is noon, 30 January.
__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 13th, 2016, 07:15 PM   #12
dadabouttown
Registered User
 
dadabouttown's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,065
Likes (Received): 870

I'm a bit surprised at the price tag given pressures on public resources. That's a really posh warehouse - albeit it needs to have a lot of very specialised internal fitting to safely and securely store the art and archives in question.

And perhaps they want to open up much more to the public as a resource than I'd thought. with knock on effects on facility costs.
dadabouttown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 13th, 2016, 07:19 PM   #13
Intrepid121
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 283
Likes (Received): 116

Quote:
Originally Posted by dadabouttown View Post
I'm a bit surprised at the price tag given pressures on public resources. That's a really posh warehouse - albeit it needs to have a lot of very specialised internal fitting to safely and securely store the art and archives in question.

And perhaps they want to open up much more to the public as a resource than I'd thought. with knock on effects on facility costs.
I'm no expert, but the control of temp, moisture, light etc. will cost a pretty penny, and here's hoping they do have public access and cafe etc. in the mix
Intrepid121 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2016, 10:43 AM   #14
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

Quote:
Originally Posted by Intrepid121 View Post
I'm no expert, but the control of temp, moisture, light etc. will cost a pretty penny, and here's hoping they do have public access and cafe etc. in the mix
From what I remember from the consultation, it sounds like there'll be a fair bit of public access and they described it as a visitor destination in its own right - there was talk of a large plaza facing the Walk, sculpture garden, exhibition areas, library, public research rooms, café, unspecified uses for the local community, etc. That said, obviously most of the building will still need to be off limits to the public.

As you say, designing with Passivhaus principles won't come cheap and it will be big - at least 3 or 4 times larger than the NMS collection centre next door. I read somewhere it will be one of the world's biggest Passivhaus buildings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dadabouttown View Post
I'm a bit surprised at the price tag given pressures on public resources. That's a really posh warehouse - albeit it needs to have a lot of very specialised internal fitting to safely and securely store the art and archives in question.
The cost is a bit eye-watering. I don't doubt that the facilities are needed or begrudge a big cultural investment at Granton but its tempting to imagine what else they might have delivered for the same money - a National Museum of Photography and a standalone gallery for the Scottish Art collection, converted from New Register House and General Register House? A new gallery building on the Castle Terrace car park site? Or, being less Edinburgh-centric, a series of smaller satellite galleries across the country?
__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2016, 11:56 AM   #15
dadabouttown
Registered User
 
dadabouttown's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,065
Likes (Received): 870

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenspeckle View Post
The cost is a bit eye-watering. I don't doubt that the facilities are needed or begrudge a big cultural investment at Granton but its tempting to imagine what else they might have delivered for the same money - a National Museum of Photography and a standalone gallery for the Scottish Art collection, converted from New Register House and General Register House? A new gallery building on the Castle Terrace car park site? Or, being less Edinburgh-centric, a series of smaller satellite galleries across the country?
Very much agree. As you say it sounds like most of this kind of facility is needed and arguably the mound extension is about maximising an existing investment.

Gallery use of the Register buildings would IMHO probably be the ideal use for them - not sure what else could properly fill the shoes of such a grand complex of corridors, domes and gardens without being a bit sub optimal. Even a 5 star hotel might struggle to make the complex cherent. Along with the Concert Hall at Dundas House etc, galleries there would create a whole cultural quarter in those back lanes. Fantasy stuff.

That said, I can see a lot of justified opposition to more investment in Edinburgh. I think a stronger satellite strategy would make more immediate sense for a national institution.

Last edited by dadabouttown; December 14th, 2016 at 12:02 PM.
dadabouttown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2017, 01:18 PM   #16
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

John McAslan wins £75m National Galleries of Scotland archive job

The Architects' Journal - 6th June 2017

Quote:
John McAslan + Partners has won a publicly tendered contract for a new £75 million low-energy archive for The National Galleries of Scotland (NGS) in Granton, Edinburgh

The London-based AJ100 practice defeated an undisclosed shortlist of firms to land the 30,000m² National Collections Facility (NCF) project earmarked for a waterfront site within the city’s brownfield regeneration zone.

The phased scheme will create a publicly accessible store to Passivhaus standard for more than 100,000 of the museum’s artworks, including paintings, sculpture, photographs and printed material. It is scheduled to complete in 2021 and images of the new facility have yet to be revealed.

An NGS spokesperson said: ‘The contract is to design a scheme which fully utilises the Granton site and will outline proposals for realising the site vision across what is expected to be four phases of construction. It is envisaged that the design would be submitted for detailed planning in winter 2017/18.

‘The NCF will be a purpose-built collection centre for the high-quality care, and the effective management and distribution of the national art collection. It will transform public access and will help deliver an international and national presence for research and education. The NCF will also be an exemplar of high energy and efficiency underpinned by the rigour of the Passivhaus building standard.’

The NCF will be constructed on a 4.5ha site which was formerly home to the Madelvic Motor Carriage Company, an early car manufacturing company, and features one surviving Category B-listed building. Owned by city astronomer William Peck, the company produced an electric car powered by a fifth wheel in 1898.

Nearby landmarks within the waterfront regeneration area include BDP’s 1,300m² Granton Centre for Art, completed for NGS in 2003, and the Hoskins Architects-masterplanned National Museums Collection Centre, which houses 12 million items from National Museums Scotland.

The latest commission comes three years after Hoskins Architects was appointed by NGS for a £15.3 million refurbishment of its main venue on The Mound in central Edinburgh.

Once completed, the NCF building will bring together the collections of the National Galleries of Scotland, the Royal Scottish Academy, the Demarco Archive and the Artist Rooms under one roof.
__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC

AbidM liked this post
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 19th, 2017, 10:21 AM   #17
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

John McLellan: Waterfront cultural quarter shows vision

Edinburgh Evening News - 19th October 2017

Quote:
It’s still at the earliest stages, but award-winning Glasgow-born architect John McAslan has just revealed North Edinburgh is set for a new sculpture trail. Not the most earth-shattering news you might think, but it’s part of a project which could transform the troubled Waterfront district.

Four months ago McAslan was appointed by the National Galleries of Scotland to draw up proposals for the uninspiring-sounding National Collections Facility, but this is a £75m home for the hundreds of paintings and sculptures the NGS keeps in its Granton Arts Store, but doesn’t have the room to put on public display.

The NCF will also house arts impresario Richard Demarco’s huge archive charting the development of the Edinburgh Festival, plus the records of the Royal Scottish Academy and Historic Environment Scotland.

Depending on what McAslan produces – and his track record, including the King’s Cross station concourse, is strong – a brand new cultural quarter with Edinburgh’s answer to Dundee’s transformative waterfront V&A museum at its heart could arise from an unremarkable industrial estate.

In fact, this estate is home to not one but two vast troves of treasure; not just the Galleries’ store but also the National Museum’s Collection Centre and research base.

According to brief details published by McAslan’s firm this month, public sculpture trails would be part of a vision to open up access to the Galleries’ collection, with libraries, research rooms and lecture theatres as well as display areas in a new campus on West Granton Road. A planning application is expected by spring next year.

There is also the B-listed Madelvic car factory, way ahead of its time when built in 1899 to make electric cars. It narrowly avoided demolition eight years ago and is ripe for reuse as an attraction to give the site genuine historic context.

The Granton revival has stumbled along after coming to a juddering halt in the financial crash 10 years ago, and discussions usually revolve around the kind of housing the area needs, how the new population will get to work and go shopping, and not so much about why they’d want to live there in the first place.

“It’s not the Green Belt” is one of the top reasons for its development, hardly a compelling message for prospective residents.

Creating sustainable employment opportunities to reduce commuting is easy to say and difficult to do, and a couple of museum stores with research facilities won’t make much difference. But with a wider vision and the involvement of the universities, a significant focal point could redefine the area.

It might even include another prominent listed building, the infamous Gasometer; Scottish Gas parent Centrica has been headquartered there for some time, after all.

A discussion in the City Chambers this week touched upon the future of the area and immediately threw up a challenge, because its proudly working class history has led to presumptions that New Granton would be dominated by social housing. That’s certainly been the strong demand from homelessness campaigners.

But the counter-argument, that the city should be creating mixed communities not ghettos, would suggest that what the area needs is premium housing as well as high volumes of low-cost accommodation.

Call it gentrification if you want, but a cultural and educational centre would provide a focal point for all types of housing, and more importantly challenge negative preconceptions.


Read more at: http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.co...sion-1-4590414
__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 25th, 2018, 10:34 AM   #18
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

Report from this week's Finance and Resources Committee seeking approval for the sale and acquisition of land at West Granton Road.

Quote:
The National Museums Collection Centre at Granton is occupied by National Museums Scotland (NMS) and provides a home for many items that are not currently on display in museums.

With support from the Scottish Government, NMS wish to expand the facility to provide sufficient capacity for further years of collection growth. In addition, NMS will be able to provide greater public access and promote National Museums Collection Centre (NMCC) as a Centre of Excellence in the conservation, access to and research of Collections.

To facilitate this expansion, NMS approached the Council to acquire the area shown shaded blue on the plan (attached as appendix 1) which extends to approximately 0.57 hectares (1.41 acres). It is a brownfield site enclosed by palisade fencing and subject to regular fly-tipping.

Following the acquisition by the Council of the National Grid Forthquarter site, a masterplan will be prepared for the regeneration of the Granton Waterfront area. To assist with site assembly for future development the Council are seeking to acquire two small areas of land from NMS and this will form part of the transaction.

The sites, shown shaded green and pink on the plan extend 0.08 hectares (0.20 acres) and 0.03 hectares (0.08 acres) respectively.
__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC

Woodystem liked this post
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2018, 09:57 AM   #19
Kenspeckle
Moderator
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 9,271
Likes (Received): 4511

Demarco archive to be saved for nation in £75m Edinburgh art facility

The Scotsman - 15th November 2018

Quote:
The future of one of Scotland’s most important cultural collections is set to be secured in a multimillion-pound new development on Edinburgh’s waterfront.

A permanent home for Richard Demarco’s archive of photographs, documents and publications dating back to the early 1960s would be created as part of a new National Collections Facility for the country’s most important works of art.

The collection amassed by the artist and promoter is expected to be a centrepiece of a £75 million “open house” archive complex for the National Galleries of Scotland, which it is planning to create on derelict land in Granton.

Scottish architect John McAslan has been appointed to create the new base for the National Galleries of Scotland, which runs three major galleries in Edinburgh. The earmarked site was once home to one of Britain’s first purpose-built car factories and is near the home of Granton’s gasworks, which closed in 2001.

Demarco, who is renowned for his collaborations with European artists and companies, has spent decades trying to find a permanent home for the archive, which was once held at the old Royal High School on Edinburgh’s Calton Hill. Most of it is now held at Summerhall, the arts centre created in the city’s former vet school in 2011 .

The National Collection Facility would give members of the public, art experts, artists and students access to 100,000 works of art dating from the early Renaissance period to the present day, including Scottish artists Allan Ramsay, Sir Henry Raeburn, John Bellany, Joan Eardley, John Byrne, Eduardo Paolozzi, Francis Cadell and Alison Watt. The first detailed designs for the facility are expected to be revealed early next year.

Demarco, a co-founder of the Traverse Theatre and the Demarco Gallery, has one of the most extensive archives relating to the Edinburgh Festival, dating back to its 1947 origins. The National Galleries owns a quarter of his archive and is in talks which would see it assume responsibility for the rest.

Demarco, 88, who suffered a stroke last year, said: “I’ve not had a permanent home for the archive since 1973, when I lost my building at Melville Crescent, in the west end.

“I have a responsibility for it as it is a manifestation of Scotland’s unique cultural relationship with Europe. That’s the main thing I’m worried about. Edinburgh and its festival are an international stage.

“At my age, this project in Granton could perhaps mean I don’t see my life’s work disappear down a plug-hole. Around 90 per cent of the people who helped create the archive are dead now.”

A National Galleries spokesman said: “Comprising hundreds of thousands items amassed by Richard Demarco, the archive documents his long career as an artist, collector, exhibition organiser, theatre promoter, educator, and influential advocate for both Scottish and international contemporary art. It holds a wealth of information from the 1960s to the present day and offers a unique record of cultural life in Scotland over the last 60 years.

“The National Collection Facility will be an open house for art and communities, where we care for and research our country’s art collection, providing state-of-the-art spaces and facilities for conservation and study, as well as the management and distribution of the collection, allowing us to share it more widely across Scotland and the rest of the world.”

A statement from McAslan said: “The National Collection Facility will be a world-leading exemplar for the care and conservation of museum collections. It will create a space where the collection can be experienced in a uniquely flexible way by staff and a wide variety of visitors, including the public, artists, academics, curators and conservators.”


Read more at: https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/d...lity-1-4834685
__________________
Edinburgh Forum on Twitter | @EdinburghSSC
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2018, 10:38 AM   #20
Marsupalami
Registered User
 
Marsupalami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 4,348
Likes (Received): 808

pity that the NG collections is in such a mingin' area compared to say...the Shore
Marsupalami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ADDIS ABABA | *Projects Fact File* yosef Addis Ababa 1029 February 21st, 2019 03:51 AM
Edinburgh | Development Summary 2019 Kenspeckle Edinburgh 3 January 2nd, 2019 07:48 PM
Edinburgh | Development Summary 2018 Kenspeckle Edinburgh 10 May 4th, 2018 02:08 PM
DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY - Sunderland and Durham Forum PROJECTS Listing Newcastle Historian Sunderland and Durham 0 March 2nd, 2010 03:41 PM
DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY - Newcastle Metro Area Forum: Projects Listing newcastlepubs Newcastle Metro Area 0 February 7th, 2010 06:32 PM


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us