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Old May 23rd, 2005, 01:24 AM   #1
Jsweeneypm
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NHS Greater Glasgow - Future Estates





I believe that this is one aspect of Glasgow’s long term future that has as yet not been the subject of much discussion and debate on these boards. NHS Greater Glasgow, along with other bodies such as the Glasgow Housing Association will have a considerable impact on the future state of the city’s built landscape, as well as other major factors such as the sustainability of certain communities within the wider conurbation, and the distribution of integrated future public transport infrastructure and services, in particular the planned light rail transport route along the Upper Clyde and it’s environs. In the wake of the Greater Glasgow Acute Services Review in 2002, a major £700 million programme of investment in new facilities at five of the city’s principal hospitals; Stobhill General Hospital, the Victoria Infirmary, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Gartnavel General Hospital, and the Southern General Hospital is planned over the next decade or so, or indeed is already underway. It would be interesting to hear everyone’s opinions on the proposed future make-up of our local health service and it’s associated facilities and resulting impact on the local communities of Glasgow and the immediate districts. This is particularly pertinent given the incredibly vociferous opposition to much of NHS Greater Glasgow’s modernisation plans for the area, spearheaded of course by the Evening Times in their campaigns against the scrapping of inpatient beds at the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital at Gartnavel, and of course the campaign against the closure of the Queen Mother’s Maternity Hospital at Yorkhill. Other major campaigns have resulted in considerable political upheaval, particularly in East Dunbartonshire, where a once safe Labour Seat has been rocked by the election of Dr Jean Turner to the Scottish Parliament, running solely on a Save Stobhill ticket, in opposition to the scrapping of in-patient services and the running down of the Casualty unit there. The rebellion against Scottish Executive health policy has also directly resulted in Liberal Democrat Jo Swinson's election as the UK's youngest MP in the recent General Election, overturning John Lyons' previous majority of almost 3000 votes...

http://www.haseler.net/stobhill/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politi...nd/4519579.stm

The fundamental aims of the Acute Services Review are in a nutshell:

-In-patient services provided at a re-developed Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Gartnavel General Hospital and a major new development at the Southern General Hospital that is planned to create the largest hospital facility in the UK. The creation of a new ‘Western Infirmary’ at Gartnavel enabling the closure of the existing Western Infirmary site. A new state-of-the-art £100m Beatson Oncology Centre, the UK’s largest cancer centre of excellence will open at Gartnavel in 2007.

-Development of two new Ambulatory Care and Diagnostic Hospitals at the Victoria Infirmary/Queens Park and Stobhill General Hospital. Both sites will have £60 million of additional investment in upgrading and modernisation. Out-patient, Day Surgery and Minor Injury Units will be provided at all five sites.

-Two full Accident and Emergency units provided at Glasgow Royal Infirmary and the Southern General. Trauma and orthopaedic in-patient services will also be provided from these two hospitals

-An additional £100 million will be provided for the development of consolidated Adult, Maternity and Paediatric services through the relocation of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children at Yorkhill to one of the five Hospital sites by 2009 - 2010, though the most likely locations are believed to be either Gartnavel General Hospital in the West End or the Southern General Hospital in the South Side. An Independent Working Group chaired by Professor Andy Calder of Edinburgh University will conclude the final location of this centralised facility.

The locations:

The new Victoria Infirmary and Stobhill General Hospital

Initially Due to start construction: Spring 2005
Opening: Last quarter of 2007

Non Clinical Services provided at both sites:

• Day Surgery Unit
• Treatments for blood disorders and cancers
• Diagnostic treatments that require X-rays and scans including specialist imaging (CT and MRI scanners)
• Adult Renal dialysis unit
• Laboratory and Pathology Services
• Minor Injuries Unit
• Day hospital for the elderly and 60 new-build inpatient rehabilitation beds for the elderly
• GP Out-of-Hours Service
• Rehabilitation and therapy services including dietetics, physiotherapy, speech and language therapy, podiatry (feet) and occupational therapy

Victoria Infirmary ACAD Site:





Stobhill Hospital ACAD Site:









Stobhill Hospital Site Masterplan:

(The A-listed Stobhill Clocktower will be retained in the redevelopment - Listed Buildings outlined in dark red below)




Proposed Local Forensic Psychiatric Unit for Stobhill General Hospital. This facility allows patients to receive care and treatment within a safe, secure environment until they are well enough to be cared for in Glasgow's other psychiatric facilities, or to return to their own homes. There will be a further 111 bed psychiatric unit provided at Stobhill in order to replace those services at Parkhead Hospital.

http://www.show.scot.nhs.uk/ggpct/secure/LFPU1.jpg

Site Masterplan for Gartnavel General Hospital:

The present 465-bed in-patient services are planned to be retained at the site and expanded upon as the services provided at the Western Infirmary relocate and integrate with this site. The existing Hospital already operates in close partnership with the Western Infirmary, including at present, the provision of a shared campus for the Beatson Oncology Centre. In the future it will be established as the base for the West of Glasgow's ambulatory care facilities. Gartnavel already has a 4 theatre day surgery unit, endoscopy suite, imaging department (including CT and radiology), and the main concentration of out-patient accommodation. The range and complexity of services provided at Gartnavel General Hospital has been progressively expanded over the past few years, with the development of the Brownlee Centre for communicable diseases, which replaced services previously offered by Glasgow's Infectious Diseases Hospitals which have been phased out over recent years as such conditions declined in number. The new Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital, and a new ophthalmology department have also been developed on site in recent years. As Gartnavel General and the Western Infirmary are effectively a monolithic acute service facility spread across two sites, the long-term plan is to gradually transfer and modernise services from the Western Infirmary site to the Gartnavel site, resulting in the ultimate closure of the Western Infirmary and centralisation of all services and facilities at Garnavel.

This plan includes the development of a new, state-of-the-art 112 bed mental health facility to replace Gartnavel Royal Hospital whose redevelopment is likely to take the form of very high quality residential accommodation and the conversion of the surplus East and West Houses for residential/hotel or leisure use.





Gartnavel Royal Hospital:



New Beatson Oncology Centre:



Glasgow Royal Infirmary:



Glasgow Royal Infirmary provides 1077 in-patient beds, and provides a vast range of local, regional, and national services. The current in-patient compliment is planned to be sustained for the forseeable future.

Development is currently underway on the second phase of a redevelopment programme originally envisaged in the 1960’s to replace the James Millar designed hospital buildings dating from 1914. Over £60 million of the new capital development programme has already been completed.

These new developments include;

-The Princess Royal Maternity Hospital. Facilities include the provision of 100 beds, 14 delivery rooms, two operating theatres, 18 day beds, neo-natal care and full antenatal services.



-Plastic Surgery and Burns Facilities: these replace the previous facilities at Canniesburn Hospital. They provide six operating theatres, 85 inpatient beds, outpatient facilities, medical photography facilities, and support accommodation.

-New A&E Department located within the new Jubilee Building: these replace previous on-site accommodation dating back 100 years. They are planned to handle 70,000 accident and emergency cases per annum and include integral Emergency Receiving and Coronary Care facilities, eventually also replacing services presently offered at Stobhill Hospital.

New 1000 space multi-storey Car Parking Arrangements:

http://www.youngandgault.co.uk/portf...rcial/002.html



New Southern General Hospital:



This phased new-build, state-of-the-art, integrated hospital facility will be Britain’s largest. It is planned to retain over 955 modern inpatient beds.

This new hospital will provide all the acute in-patient services for the Southside and West of Scotland/Nationwide services for Neurosciences and Spinal Injuries. It would also be the home of the principal Accident and Emergency\trauma centre service on the Southside, readily accessible off the M8/M74 Extension, M77 Ayrshire link and Clyde Tunnel.

It will provide in-patient services for:
general medicine
Acute geriatric assessment
general surgery
orthopaedics
gynaecology
urology
vascular services
clinical haematology
ENT
nephrology
dermatology
ophthalmology (although its needs for in-patient beds is
expected to decline significantly, thus in the long term will only be an outpatient service)
maxillo-facial surgery (the only unit in the city, replacing services previously offered at Canniesburn Hospital in Bearsden)


As most ‘Urban Explorers’ from Hidden Glasgow will already be well aware, the reform and consolidation of the city’s NHS estates has already been underway for some time, initially concentrating on the closure of redundant hospitals and facilities such as Ruchill Hospital, Robroyston Hospital, Belvidere Hospital, Leverndale Hospital, the Glasgow Royal Maternity Hospital, Canniesburn Hospital, Bellshill Maternity Hospital, Woodilee Hospital, Lennox Castle Hospital, Gartloch Asylum etc…Many of these buildings will be or are currently in the process of being converted to residential and/or commercial use.

Here are some cases in point:

Site Plan of Woodilee Hospital redevelopment as part of the wider Kirkintilloch Initiative:





The former Woodilee hospital site will now be home to a brand new housing development boasting a diverse range of over 900 new residences developed by Cala, Miller, Persimmon and Redrow, as well as new leisure and community facilities. Development of this area is a principal objective of the Kirkintilloch Initiative and is central to bringing new life, customers and income to the local economy. The ‘Kirkintilloch Link Road’ will further link this site with the town centre and the motorway system. It will also be linked to the town centre by the countryside access network.

-----------------------

-Approval was granted on Thursday April 28th to develop a private housing estate, containing homes valued up to £200,000 each in the former infectious diseases hospital at Ruchill. To my knowledge, all the existing listed buildings, in particular the spectacular Watertower, are to be refurbished and integrated into the new residential development. The buildings were designed in 1900 by Glasgow's City Engineer and Surveyor, Alexander.B.MacDonald in his preferred Renaissance Style with Tudor motifs. His other Glaswegian works include; The People’s Palace 1893-8, The Prince of Wales Bridge, Kelvingrove Park 1894, The Sanitary Chambers 1895-7 and the gates and lodges of the Botanic Gardens 1904.

Ruchill Hospital Watertower:


All of this has caused a bit of a stushie throughout the local community, as was reported in the Glaswegian. Councillor Jim Mackechnie has branded it a betrayal, as it goes against the conclusions of the Joint Community Consultation Group that was formed by the then owners of the site, Scottish Enterprise Glasgow regarding the demand for socially rented homes in the area as opposed to the owner-occupied residentials which is part of the Ruchill & Keppoch New Neighbourhood Initiative. They say they are dismayed by the Council and GHA’s persistence that there is in fact negligible demand for public sector housing in Ruchill, and claim that it will exacerbate issues of social inclusion in the area. I don’t necessarily agree, it all really hinges on the boring details of the proposals, this could in fact be the primary catalyst to bringing a transfusion of the prosperity of the West End into the fringes of Northern Glasgow. This of course will hopefully turn out to be a well integrated development, that will expand the West End and mitigate the residents bone of contention. Following the example of other local regeneration projects such as the Maryhill and Glasgow North Canal Regeneration Project, it should hopefully form an important, symbiotic conduit between the communities of Firhill, Maryhill, Ruchill and Possilpark. As I have said before, I don’t think this rejuvenation can come fast enough, considering the disgraceful state that quite possibly Glasgow’s finest Victorian hospital was left in by the Greater Glasgow Health Board.

http://www.glasgowcitycouncil.co.uk/...e_#2804DRS.pdf

-----------------

Canniesburn Hospital Masterplan:

This Masterplan was prepared by the Holmes Partnership for Cala Homes who have achieved a successful bid to redevelop the site. It incorporates the redevelopment of the 21 acre hospital site into 3 distinct areas, namely the millennium apartments, the art-deco flats and the ‘garden city’. The development will comprise of the integration of newbuild, refurbisment and restoration of existing B listed art-deco buildings, coupled with a sympathetic landscaping strategy, insuring the retention of mature woodland where possible, which will create an enhanced and attractive residential environment.







------------------

Gartloch Hospital Masterplan:

http://www.gartloch-village.co.uk/

This strategic Masterplan undertaken by Bishoploch proposes the creation of a new village at Gartloch comprised of several hamlets formed around a town centre, forming an interconnected hierarchy of small scale settlements. Each hamlet is seen as a small scale, low key intervention within the landscape, integrated as far as possible with the existing topography. In addition it is hoped that each hamlet will have a unique character and its own sense of place which will be achieved through varied theming of the architectural and landscaping treatments within each area.

The masterplan comprises the following elements:



The Mews:

This sector forms an important focus for the development, sited on relatively high ground, it boasts excellent views north towards the Campsie Fells. The proposed form of development here is that of a central mews courtyard that will form the centrepiece of the scheme, creating a windbreak on the plateau and a strong focal point when viewed from the entrance.



The Avenue:

This 'hamlet' is connected to the Mews Village via a new road link formed through an enlarged break in the tree belt separating the two land parcels. The nature of this hamlet is self contained and enclosed which is brought about by the equillibrium formed with the adjacent forested areas.



The Woods:

This site is the smallest of the proposed hamlets and is envisaged as a secluded enclave within the surrounding mature woodland, which will be appropriate for a high value cluster of development. There currently exists a natural clearing within the woods which would form the basis of the development of this land parcel. Access is gained to the site via an existing, upgraded road.

The Courtyard:

The Hamlet sits in a prominent parkland setting in view of both the main core and the Bishop Loch itself. The central east/west axis passing through the core will be extended by the form of the new development, possibly in the shape of a residential courtyard block. The scale and form of the courtyard block could be used to visually integrate the new build development with the adjacent core buildings.



Gartloch Crescent:

This site is characterised by it's inherent proximity to the core of Listed Asylum Buildings and by its gentle gradient south towards the Bishop Loch. Therein exists an exciting opportunity to create a strong formal composition of buildings and open space which relate to the geometry of the main group, and form an integrated whole with it.



The Deco Village:

The hamlet takes it's inspiration from the original, simple geometric forms of the B-Listed Nurses Home (dating from 1937), it's refurbishment and integration will form the basis of this new residential zone.



The Town Centre:

The core of the development will be sited around the original, converted listed buildings of the former Asylum. The re-landscaped roundel formed at the main facade of the old Administrative Block will act as a ‘Village Green’, forming a communal public space for the entire community, which will also include the provision of a children’s play area. Convenience is the key in this site, as it is optimally located within 400 yards of 95% of the homes on site. This connectivity will be enhanced by the provision of a network of pedestrian and cycle friendly routes linking the Town Centre with the surrounding Hamlets. The roundel will also form the principal transport conduit for the Town, being the location of a new bus loop and drop-off point.





Some interesting overviews of original 1960’s era masterplans for the redevelopment of the Royal Infirmary, Western Infirmary and Gartnavel General Hospital by the then Western Regional Hospital Board. (Originally posted by 'My Kitten' on HG)

Western Infirmary Redevelopment by Keppie Henderson & Partners, circa 1970-’74





Gartnavel General Hospital by Keppie Henderson & Partners, circa 1967-’72





Glasgow Royal Infirmary Phase 1 & 2-(unbuilt) by Sir Basil Spence, Glover & Ferguson, circa 1973-’79









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Old May 23rd, 2005, 11:00 AM   #2
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jeaz, very comprehensive. Well done!
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Old May 23rd, 2005, 01:25 PM   #3
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what an informative thread on health care development in glasgow J sweeny . just goes to show the confidence of investment from the health board towards Glasgow, all the different hospital developments round the city for the future must be hitting near the £billion mark ??..
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Old May 23rd, 2005, 08:09 PM   #4
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very comprehensive posting jsweeney, reading it you get the feeling that trying to address or even relate to design issues or architecture in any real sense would be like trying to change the direction of the tsunami.

It's no wonder architects of any note choose not to get involved. 8 Billion pounds of investment there may be mo but not a single building, new build or refurbishment really worth a damn as far as quality of design is concerned. The new royal infirmary extension to the maternity wing is an architectural horror story.

Now you must therefore ask yourself why that is, in my view it is those who are commissioning building see the quality of the design environment as something secondary to the provision of the physical requirements of providing space where medical care can be given and basic shelter obtained.

I wondEr if there is a single hopital anywhere in the UK, which would delight the senses as much as satisfy a clinical need?
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Old May 23rd, 2005, 09:05 PM   #5
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Quote:
It's no wonder architects of any note choose not to get involved. 8 Billion pounds of investment there may be mo but not a single building, new build or refurbishment really worth a damn as far as quality of design is concerned
wowee!! £8 Billion is that scotland only or the whole of the UK alan?..how can they justify that kind of money investment in the health service without any quality and architechtualy merited buildings?, i would have thought the government would look for best value for money for the long term rather than fling up/fling out scenario.. after all its everybodys taxes that get hit to line up the administrators pockets and high sallarys, it should be highlighted to the westminester parliament and to the scottish executive of this subject
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Old May 23rd, 2005, 09:17 PM   #6
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the difficulty is that "commodity, firmness and delight" are not quantifiable elements. They cannot be measured, counted or empirically proven and until they can be architecture and good design will always be secondary issues in the building of hospitals, particularly to the accountants, managers and politicians, where every penny is a hostage and economics in the NHS is a deeply political issue.

All the new buildings on Jsweeny's posting are big sheds with a little tarra diddle added for flavour. No real investigation is being undertaken or analysis of what makes a good and epathtic enviroment for a hospital beacuse they are satifying a direct building need and the architects who are designing them have probably pared their fees to the bone to get the work

Hey it's probably more than 8 billion, the NHS bleeds money.
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Old May 23rd, 2005, 11:46 PM   #7
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The homeopathic is quack medicine, bleeding funds. The whole NHS is a ginormous black hole.

I cannot believe they were planning to bulldoze the Royal Infirmary back in the 60's (well, actually I can believe). Best news has to be the removal of the Western it'll have a massive impact on Kelvingrove.

The architecture varies, I like the look of the Beatson and SGH, incidentally is that a helipad on the roof? it looks to me to be built on the site of the existing air ambulance...
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Old May 24th, 2005, 10:59 PM   #8
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Ad at home, I tend to agree with you about wondering why any architect of any worth would get involved in the hardly believably bad built product the NHS delivers. Then again we could turn this around and wonder why the architectural profession has lamentably failed to make any impression of any note on the NHS - especialiy as it is one of the biggest generator of projects in the UK. I suspect that the truth is that architects have tried and given up in the face of the impossible nature of the client that the NHS would be.

I served for just over a year in the Greater Glasgow Health Council before I gave up over the pointlessness of it all. These Councils of volunteers ('approved' by the Health Minister of course)were supposed in some way to represent the interests of the patient and the public. I did not come across one jot of evidence that they had any impact or influence on the medicos and adminers that run the NHS. The NHS seemed to be one massive swarming battlefield of sectional interests - and not just the much-maligned senior consultants.Now even these Councils have gone - all wrapped up into one big 'national' one, The new national Council Chairperson (approved of course by the Scottish Health Minister) is a guy who already has his MBE gong, so I'm not sure why he's still doing it.

I found the NHS a really wierd Universe. Huge sums - millions and millions - are poured into things like 'community engagement' and 'patient consultation' and 'consultant-led transport reviews' without any evidence of any results. They also have this obsession with naming NHS hospitals and buildings after Royalty, like the ghastly-named Jubilee in Inverclyde.

I also participated in the recent public date on the future NHS in the Scottish Parliament some weeks ago. It was an impressive affair with an unusually high calibre public debate. However, I must admit that it was only on reading this thread today that I realised that not one contribution, or even reference, was made during that day-long debate to the issue of quality of the NHS estate.
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Old May 25th, 2005, 04:06 PM   #9
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Ironically or depressingly, what ever way you want to look at it, it's the projects and building types most in need of a good architect that's least likely to get it......hospitals being the most obvious.

It's a wonder really why the same dust is not kicked up for poor hospital buildings as ppp schools. It can only be that architects have recognised over time that is not worth the effort to try and secure commissions in this field.

A million years ago, seems like, we did the feasability study for the new maternity wing and the Royal Infirmary and the proposals for the possible reuse of the James Miller Building. Took some time over it too, more than we should have really hoping we'd get a shot at a new building but to no avail.

Think we talked ourselves out of it by emphasising urban design, gateway to the city, empathetic environments, daylight, warm materials, new public spaces, underground car parking........mustv'e scared them shitless really.

Breaks my heart to see the monsrosity that's at the head of the M8 into Glasgow, though
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Old May 25th, 2005, 04:47 PM   #10
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have sent an image or our proposals to Gleegie for posting if he thinks it worthwhile.

Sorry crusty, I know you explained to me how to post myself but I've only recently learned how to fully access the internet, emails and attachments.........one step at a time
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Old May 25th, 2005, 10:51 PM   #11
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Royal Infirmary masterplan, courtesy alan d.

First, the site as was. My eyes were drawn to the exuberant tenements on the site of Strathclyde University's (now) car park. A valiant last stand against the encroaching hordes of ranked commieblocks. The actual sixties Hospital building I rank highly though. It's of good quality, thank god they ran out of money prior to reaching the edwardian buildings though...


The plan. The tower reminds me a lot of Glasgow university's library building. Hopefully Strathclyde university will eventually grow to fill the void between hospital and city.
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Old September 11th, 2005, 02:12 PM   #12
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Should be mentioned that Stobhill and Victoria ACAD's (and presumably the new South Glasgow Hospital) have been redesigned. For the better too.
http://library.nhsgg.org.uk/mediaAss...affnews013.pdf

Particularly the new Stobhill which is clean and elegant. Reiach and Hall are the architects.


and has an impressive full height atrium.


The Victoria though is still something of a hulk. It looks to be going on the playing fields opposite the terrace, I can't work out if the derelict adjoining school is to be saved.


The crescent is at least interesting, why an American ambulance?


The costs have escalated (quel suprise), such that Stobhill will come in at £80 million and Victoria at £112 million. Scheduled to start in, ummm "Spring 2005" with completion 2008.
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Old September 11th, 2005, 03:51 PM   #13
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What is going on with the Beatson? It looks great here...


In every other image I've seen however it looks appalling. Construction by Miller Group.


It's being designed by Hypostyle for £87 million over 5 levels. Construction commencing in July 2004 and scheduled for completion in 2007.
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Old September 11th, 2005, 04:10 PM   #14
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Thanks for this Geegie! The stobhill stuff looks like the new(ish) Wishaw General, but the new Viccy looks like hospital in "Carry on Matron". Do you think its a cert the old Viccy will go for flats then?
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Old September 11th, 2005, 06:48 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gleegieboy
The homeopathic is quack medicine, bleeding funds.
Whatever some may say to put it down, it cured my sister of severe eczema. I wonder how much you actually know about this area of medicine before you actually start knocking it.

I was at DSSR over summer 2004, on a Summar Placement thingy. They were all guns blazing at that point trying to get Beatson out the door. The firm has a very strong heritage in designing services for medical buildings, but I wasn't really involved in the team that does that stuff.

Interesting to see some of their old litearature, and that ghastly old logo! The new one is a considerable improvement!
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Old September 11th, 2005, 09:02 PM   #16
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according to the Lancet it's the thought that counts, empirical data published two weeks ago showed that homeopathic medicine was bunkum, in a group of 100 people with various mild symptoms half were given homeopathic "cures" , half a placebo..... cures rates were the same.
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Old September 11th, 2005, 09:56 PM   #17
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Interesting...

Anyway, back on topic. I just got back to Glasgow last night having lived down in Lonodn for the last 3 months. The newly opened UCL Hospital in Euston (another DSSR project!) has been the subject of controversy down there because of a £70,000 ornamental stone (that was paid for by charitable donations), that was placed at the entrance to the hospital.

Needless to say, the Sun (which is invariably full of shit) ran a piece saying that this money could have paid for 3 nurses instead, blah blah blah. Well in fact no - it couldn't. The money all came from donations, which can't go towards medical care.

Point is, if there's going to be uproar over just 70k - none of it from the NHS - going towards making the place look nicer rather than patient care, I can understand why there's so much hesitation over spending decent sums to get decent-looking hospitals. It's a fact of life, I'm afraid.

I'm not condoning it, just saying that I can understand where the NHS is coming from. Also, why can't these architects etc do better on a tight budget? Things don't have to be expensive to look good.
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Old September 11th, 2005, 10:35 PM   #18
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..............things don't have to be expensive to look good....aye right.


Last edited by ad at home; September 11th, 2005 at 10:42 PM.
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Old September 12th, 2005, 01:26 AM   #19
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Maybe I should have been clearer in conveying what I meant...

Cheap buildings don't have to look as bad as the proposed Victoria.

Last edited by Chief; September 12th, 2005 at 01:49 AM.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 02:01 PM   #20
maccoinnich
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Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Portland, OR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ad at home
..............things don't have to be expensive to look good....aye right.

Do you really think it's impossible to do good architecture on a budget? Any of the other actual architects on here care to comment?
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