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Old July 7th, 2008, 08:36 PM   #1
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SPECIAL REPORT: ABANDONED HOMES Buffalo, New York

http://www.buffalonews.com/home/story/385917.html

SPECIAL REPORT: ABANDONED HOMES
Neglected homes and vacant lots leave Buffalo residents angry
Who owns thousands of these dangerous properties? City Hall. First of three parts
By Phil Fairbanks NEWS STAFF REPORTER
Updated: 07/06/08 8:00 AM


(These slum houses, owned by City Hall, have helped make Ruhland Avenue ground zero in the fight against vacant and abandoned housing and the crime and blight that comes with it.)


(“When I first moved here…. It was a beautiful street and everyone pitched in.” — Dorothy Bobb, head of the block club on Ruhland Avenue where seven out of 10 properties are abandoned)


(Neighbor Paul Graefser has called the city to complain about this city-owned house on Pooley Place, which is full of debris, garbage, an abandonded car and collapsed garage.)


(The City of Buffalo owns these two houses, at left and right of alley, and all but a handful of lots on Ruhland Avenue. The house across the street is one of only a few still occupied.)


(An abandoned and decrepit house which is owned by the City of Buffalo on Massachusetts Avenue.)


(Myo Thant looks at the damaged condition of two vacant houses across the street from his house on Normal Avenue, one of which is owned by the City of Buffalo. Another neighbor described children playing on this property.)


If there’s a forgotten Buffalo neighborhood, a street abandoned and left for dead, it’s Ruhland Avenue. Walk down the quiet, tree-lined avenue, and you might think you’re in rural North Collins instead of the East Side. Walk a little farther and you’ll discover seven out of every 10 properties on Ruhland are vacant and abandoned.

And City Hall owns almost all of them. The two-block-long side street, once home to 50 or 60 families, now has 10 families, five on each block. A few houses, scattered here and there, still stand. But most of Ruhland is vacant lots filled with overgrown grass and weeds.

“This was a nice, nice street,” said Monique Brown, one of the few people still living there. “But now it’s the worst street over here.”

Buffalo’s vacant housing crisis, decades in the making, has exploded in recent years and neighborhoods like Ruhland and nearby Harmonia Street are the poster children in the war against it.

Stroll down Harmonia, where 35 of the 53 properties are owned or targeted to be owned by the city, and you soon discover that vacant lots outnumber people.

And many of the lots, remnants of the homes abandoned and torn down, are often nothing more than dirt strewn with weeds and garbage.

“It’s a mess,” Robert Chapmon said of his street. “We don’t have any neighbors, and the city is neglecting its own properties.”

Buffalo has the third highest vacant housing rate in the nation, and nowhere is the problem more acute than on Ruhland and Harmonia.

But don’t mistake it for an East Side problem. Or even a city problem.

A Buffalo News analysis of property, census and other records found:

• One out of every 12 or 13 properties in Buffalo — a total of 7,000 to 8,000 — will soon be owned by City Hall, making it Buffalo’s biggest landowner by far.

• Thirty-five percent of the streets in Buffalo have at least one city-owned vacant lot or house.

• Buffalo’s vacant housing rate is the highest in New York and trails only Detroit and New Orleans among the 100 largest cities in the nation.

• The vacant housing problem is spreading into Black Rock-Riverside and the city’s first-ring suburbs.

• Crime is one of the by products of vacant housing. Six out of every 10 arsons in the city last year occured at abandoned buildings. They also act as a popular dumping ground for dead bodies — seven in 2 years — many of them murder victims.

Crisis explodes

Buffalo’s housing crisis, the result of 50 years of population loss, has rapidly accelerated in recent years. The city is now a community where 23 percent of the housing units are vacant, according to a 2006 census estimate.

That translates into about 18,000 houses, or about one of every five properties in the city. The lion’s share are on the East Side and West Side.

The crisis is so big, so widespread, experts say, it may represent the single biggest challenge facing Buffalo’s neighborhoods.

“This is a big one,” said Kathryn A. Foster, director of the University at Buffalo’s Regional Institute. “It’s fair to say the vacant housing issue is a tremendous test for the city.”

And one of the reasons why is because the crisis is spreading, quickly.

“Two-thirds of our city is under grave threat,” said Aaron Bartley, director of People United for Sustainable Housing, or PUSH, a grass-roots group working to rebuild the West Side.

Bartley’s gloomy assessment is backed up by new figures from the U. S. Postal Service, which tracks the number of vacant homes where mail is “undeliverable.”

Late last year, the agency identified 18,411 addresses in the city where mail is no longer picked up.

Even worse, the Postal Service data suggests the city’s housing crisis is expanding into Black Rock and Riverside and into first-ring suburbs like Cheektowaga.

“It’s almost like a virus,” said Priscilla Almodovar, New York State’s top affordable-housing official.

In just six years, the city’s vacancy rate increased by 45 percent. And that was during a period when the city demolished at least 2,000 homes.

The owners of these vacant properties vary, but none owns more than the city itself.

By the end of this year, the city will own an estimated 7,000 to 8,000 properties, maybe more. About 60 percent of them are vacant lots.

The city’s property ownership is so great, there are now 44 city streets where City Hall owns more than 20 percent of the properties.

And nowhere is City Hall’s role as Buffalo’s single biggest landowner more evident than on the East Side.

An eerie tranquility

On streets like Playter, Ruhland and Harmonia, the city owns more than half the properties.

“When I first moved here, there were lots of houses,” said Dorothy Bobb, head of the Ruhland Avenue Block Club. “It was a beautiful street and everyone pitched in. Now, it’s all vacant lots.”

Walk down the southern half of Ruhland, off Sycamore Street, and there’s an almost eerie tranquility to the neighborhood. The dead-end street is mostly vacant lots, with a few houses, most of them vacant, scattered here and there.

With the overgrown grass lots and lack of people, there’s a rural quality to Ruhland. A stranger would be hard-pressed to believe he was on the East Side and not Wales or Akron.

“If I owned one of those fields, I’d be cited,” said Jameel Collins as he pointed to a series of city-owned lots. “And if I owned one of those vacant buildings, I’d be in Housing Court.”

On a warm, sunny day in May, the lots were overgrown with grass and weeds. Collins, who grew up in the neighborhood, said he used to mow the lots but stopped when he discovered City Hall owned most of them.

His sister, Monique Brown, is so fed up she wants to move and regrets not doing it sooner. Her son, Jamell

A. Wright, 17, was gunned down on Barthel Street in April and died a few days later.

Even now, Brown wonders if moving to a better neighborhood might have saved her son’s life.

“If it was up to me,” she said of the street she calls home, “I’d start all over.”

It’s a common lament. Start over. Start from scratch and rebuild the neighborhood house by house, block by block, street by street.

“My son keeps saying, ‘Let’s get out here, Mom,” said Zina Croom, a longtime resident of nearby Harmonia Street. “And I tell him, ‘Maybe someday you can take your Mom away from here.’ ”

Street changes

Croom and Chapmon, Harmonia residents for more than 20 years, have seen the street change from a neighborhood of homeowners to a neighborhood of renters and, now, a neighborhood dominated by vacant lots and houses.

“If it’s owned by the city, why isn’t the grass cut?” Chapmon said of the lots across from his house. “The city is neglecting its own property.”

On any given day, Croom can look down her street, and the only people she sees are the prostitutes working the corner at Sycamore.

She jokes about the problems she lives with, but it’s clear, as a mother with one teenage son still at home, she has fears. And, unfortunately for Buffalo, they’re not unique to the East Side.

On Pooley Place, a small residential street on the West Side, drug dealing and vandalism are the residue of its six vacant houses.

At one of them, 85 Pooley, a house targeted for demolition, the backyard is piled high with trash and clothes at least four feet deep.

The stench of garbage and dead animals fills the air. And in the middle of it all sits an abandoned car. Behind it, the remnants of a collapsed garage.

Neighbors say the house, which is open, is a playpen for drug dealers and an accident waiting to happen.

“This house is scary,” said Paul Graefser, a neighbor. “We have a lot of young kids on the street. This place is going to hurt someone.”

Karen Podmore, one of the street’s self-appointed watchdogs, said the houses have been a longtime problem and yet City Hall continues to turn a blind eye.

“We’ve been complaining for years about these houses,” Podmore said. “It’s embarrassing. My family comes down here and wonders how I can live in a slum.”
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Old July 7th, 2008, 08:49 PM   #2
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Old July 7th, 2008, 09:05 PM   #3
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http://www.buffalonews.com/home/story/386633.html

SPECIAL REPORT: ABANDONED HOMES
Buffalo wants to tear down its abandoned homes
Critics say the demolition effort is destined to fail, lacks plans for renovation
Second of three parts
By Phil Fairbanks NEWS STAFF REPORTER
Updated: 07/07/08 2:50 PM


(Buffalo wants to tear down 5,000 vacant houses in the next five years.)


(“All of a sudden, it was down. It’s too bad. The building had a lot of potential, a lot of character.” Peter Roetzer, who tried to buy a vacant house from the city before it was torn down)


(West Side residents hold a protest in front of a city-owned house at 288 Hudson St.)


(“There’s no plan. Their strategy is a demolition-only strategy. There’s no sense of what should be saved.” Catherine Schweitzer, Baird Foundation)


(“We’re targeting the worst. We’re convinced those structures must go. There’s really no choice.” Mayor Byron Brown about 5,000 houses the city plans to demolish)


(A vacant house on Ruhland Avenue bears markings on the condition of the interior.)

Peter Roetzer stumbled across the building at 454 Rhode Island St. during a tour of West Side homes last year. What some saw as a run-down, vacant house — a blight on the neighborhood — Roetzer saw as an intriguing brick structure full of character.

The Amherst construction contractor liked it so much that he offered the owner $3,000, with the intention of spending another $100,000 or more to fix it up.

Eight months later, the house was gone, demolished at a cost of $20,000. The owner? City Hall.

“All of a sudden, it was down,” Roetzer said. “It’s too bad. The building had a lot of potential, a lot of character.”

Housing activists say Roetzer’s tale — he and the city differ on who dropped the ball — speaks volumes about the failures of Buffalo’s strategy for dealing with its growing vacant housing crisis.

There is too much demolition, critics say, and too little effort at saving and reusing one of the city’s best assets — its low-cost housing.

“There’s no plan,” said Catherine Schweitzer of the Baird Foundation, a Buffalo group that the city approached for money to help pay for the demolitions. “Their strategy is a demolition-only strategy. There’s no sense of what should be saved.”

An hour down the Thruway, Rochester city officials are using a different strategy — saving, fixing and reselling vacant homes.

Every year, like clockwork, Rochester acquires and repairs 50 to 60 vacant homes and then sells them to first-time homebuyers.

Buffalo, a city with an even bigger vacant-housing problem, revamps an average of about seven homes a year.

“The numbers don’t lie,” said Aaron Bartley of PUSH — People United for Sustainable Housing — Buffalo, a West Side community group at the forefront of the housing crisis here.

Buffalo’s answer to its vacant housing problems is to tear the buildings down, rather than fix them up, a strategy many think is destined to fail.

Barely a year old, the city’s high-profile demolition effort — the goal of which is to tear down 5,000 homes in five years — is coming under attack. And the critics range from grass-roots neighborhood groups to the mainstream philanthropic community.

“Right now, demolitions are scattershot,” said Michael Clarke, director of the Local Initiatives Support Corp. in Buffalo, a nonprofit group studying the city’s vacant-housing crisis.

“There’s no systematic, thought-out approach. There’s no effort at making demolitions part of a larger redevelopment strategy.”

‘No choice,’ Brown says

No one disputes the need to tear down vacant homes in Buffalo. The question rub is how many and where, and what many see as the city’s haphazard, willy-nilly approach.

“People are calling for these demolitions, begging for them,” Mayor Byron

W. Brown said. “You have to understand these buildings are often a nightmarish situation for a neighborhood.”

Brown has made demolition — the “5 in 5” plan is his term for it — the focal point of his strategy for dealing with the city’s vacancy problem, now the third worst in the nation.

Buffalo is home to at least 12,000 vacant buildings and maybe as many as 18,000 if you accept estimates from the 2006 census.

“We’re targeting the worst,” Brown said of the 5,000 homes he wants to demolish in five years. “We’re convinced those structures must go. There’s really no choice.”

The mayor is by no means alone in suggesting that thousands of houses need to come down, or in arguing that residents have suffered too long with the consequences.

“The city is doing everything it can,” said Mark P. Reed, the Buffalo firefighter who nearly died while fighting a fire in a vacant house on Wende Street last year.

Reed, who later lost a leg because of his injury, may be the poster boy for what’s wrong with Buffalo’s vacant buildings.

Last year alone, 60 percent of the city’s arsons were set at vacant and abandoned buildings. Even worse, 27 firefighters were injured while battling those fires.

“They know the dangers,” Reed said of city officials. “They’re the same dangers facing people living on those streets, the same dangers facing kids in those neighborhoods.”

It’s a compelling tale, and arsons are just one chapter of the story.

People who live near these houses, many of them owned by City Hall, tell horror stories about drug use, vandalism and violence.

Sometimes, the houses even double as dumping grounds. Over the past two years, at least seven dead bodies, some of them crime victims, have been discovered in or around vacant buildings in Buffalo.

Aid sought

Patricia Almodovar, the state’s top affordable-housing official, thinks Brown is on the right track and is quick to remind people that the first-term mayor inherited the city’s housing crisis.

She also knows that not everyone in Buffalo is happy with the city’s approach. That’s why the state is working closely with groups like PUSH.

“We’re sensitive to the criticism,” Almodovar said.

Late last fall, at a closed-door meeting, Brown met with the city’s wealthiest philanthropists and asked them for a no-strings-attached donation of $2.5 million to help with the demolitions.

The answer wasn’t a flat out “no,” but Brown walked away empty-handed, one more sign that Buffalo’s answer to its vacant-housing crisis is viewed by many as shortsighted and heavy-handed.

“We are demolishing the very places that could revitalize the city,” the Baird Foundation’s Schweitzer said.

Publicly, the philanthropy community — more than eight foundations were at the November meeting with Brown — say the city’s request is still active.

Privately, they’ll acknowledge that without a more comprehensive approach, providing the money is unlikely.

“They wanted us to just give them a check,” said Robert Gioia, head of the Oishei Foundation. “We don’t work that way.”

Brown is quick to note that his “5 in 5” plan — which is on track to tear down its first 1,000 homes this year — has been lauded by the people who live each day with the crime and blight that comes with vacant property.

“I don’t think they have any concept or understanding of what conditions people are living with,” the mayor said of the foundations’s heads. “I would invite them to take a tour with me of some of these properties and see the magnitude of the problem.”

No one questions the links between vacant housing and crime, or the impact these houses have on a neighborhood. The criticism of Brown’s approach is more about what City Hall isn’t doing.

For many, it prompts begs a question: Can City Hall deal with the magnitude of its vacant housing crisis?

“Categorically, the answer is no,” Bartley said.

The city doesn’t have the staff or strategy to deal with a problem as big as vacant housing, he said. He also thinks the Brown administration suffers from “clinical paranoia” when it comes to dealing with outside groups, like PUSH, that could help.”

‘City has no plan’

There’s a sense that Buffalo needs to focus, not just on tearing down buildings, but also on what will take their place once they’re gone.

In some neighborhoods, it might be rehabilitated housing. In others, it might be green space.

“We don’t think ahead,” said Michele Johnson, a neighborhood liaison to Buffalo’s Housing Court. “The demolitions are all scattershot. Obviously, the city has no plan.”

City officials bristle at the suggestion that their demolitions are unfocused or that they’re closed to alternatives such as rehabilitation or land banking, a system of acquiring large chunks of property for redevelopment.

“The mayor’s strategy is much more than just demolitions,” said Richard Tobe, former commissioner of economic development, permits and inspection services.

To make his point, Tobe, who has since been let go by the city, pointed to two major East Side projects where demolitions are just one piece of a larger redevelopment plan.

One of them, Crescent Village, was spurred by dozens of Muslim families moving into the neighborhood around the Darul-Uloom Mosque at Sobieski and Sycamore streets.

The 16-block project started with the targeted demolition of vacant, derelict properties but includes plans to acquire, repair and resell other vacant homes.

The Crescent Village recipe also calls for other ingredients, most notably new housing and apartments, as well as home-improvement grants for low-income homeowners who are already living there.

“No one aspect is a silver bullet,” said Marlies Wesolowski, director of the Matt Urban Center, the East Side group overseeing the Crescent Village project. “The fabric of the Broadway-Fillmore community is so threadbare, we need multiple approaches.”

Even now, long before the real work is under way, the neighborhood is showing concrete signs of a turnaround. One of the most dramatic is the presence of seven Muslim doctors now living in and around nearby Sweet Avenue, once a hotbed of drugs and violence.

“This was an abandoned neighborhood,” said Dr. Zulkharnain, one of the first to move there. “People were afraid to come here. Now, our ladies can walk at night. It’s a much safer place to be.”

Peter Roetzer wanted to be part of the neighborhood turnaround on Rhode Island Street, but his dream ended when City Hall tore down the building he wanted to buy.

City officials say the house was demolished because Roetzer never responded to their request for a formal rehabilitation and financing plan. Neighborhood leaders say it was City Hall that dropped the ball and that a top city official assured them Roetzer’s purchase would be approved.

“This is typical,” said Harvey Garrett, executive director of the West Side Collaborative. “It’s just one more example of our neighborhood trying to work with city officials on saving a house and getting no help at all.”

Next: Youngstown, Ohio, is planning to shrink, not grow. What are other Rust Belt cities doing to combat their vacant housing crises?

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Old July 8th, 2008, 01:40 AM   #4
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sounds just like utica but buffalo always reminded me of a big utica anyway.
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Old July 8th, 2008, 01:53 AM   #5
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Thanks for another Buffalo hit-job thread. Not sure what the underlying point is...but yeah, there are a lot of vacant homes. Buffalo is a post-industrial American city.
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Old July 8th, 2008, 02:43 AM   #6
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No big surprise here. Buffalo has lost half of its peak population. It's in the same boat with Cleveland, Detroit, Pittsburgh, & St. Louis. And Buffalo & Pittsburgh are alone in terms continuing to lose metropolitan population. Add to that the reality that Buffalo has the oldest housing stock of any major city.

And in contrast to say St. Louis, where the housing stock is from the same age, but overwhelingly brick & more durable, Buffalo must lead urban America when it comes to the share of housing that's made of wood. Especially on the East Side, a lot of the houses are one & two story cottage & bungalow type houses thrown up hastily during the late 19th century. After a century & a half, the've become little more than shacks.

The Buffalo area has attracted even fewer new immigrants than most of the other cities that continue to lose population. The only way that places like Buffalo have any chance of coming back is to start attracting a decent share of the ten million or so new immigrants who've been coming to this country each decade. The new immigrants will do what the city can't, that is to start fixing up the housing stock, block-by-block. They'll also start opening new businesses & by their presence keep what's left of Buffalo's industrial base & attract new sectors.

Really, there's no need to re-invent the wheel here. Those are the proven strategies that other older cities in the Northeast & Midwest that have made comebacks have used. Bigger cities like NYC, & whole blocks in parts of the South Bronx & Brooklyn were abandoned just a few decades ago, Chicago, Boston, & Washington DC. Smaller cities like Jersey City, Providence, New Haven, Minneapolis, St. Paul. The challenge that many of these cities have been facing is just the opposite of Buffalo, the lack of housing.

Particularly with current challenges we face now with energy, sprawl, & lack of sustainability, it just seems to make more sense to refill older cities like Buffalo than to continiue to promote Sunbelt sprawl. As part of any national immigration reform, lets provide incentives for new immigrants to settle in places like Buffalo rather than say Pheonix!
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Old July 8th, 2008, 05:13 AM   #7
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No big surprise here. Buffalo has lost half of its peak population. It's in the same boat with Cleveland, Detroit, Pittsburgh, & St. Louis. And Buffalo & Pittsburgh are alone in terms continuing to lose metropolitan population. Add to that the reality that Buffalo has the oldest housing stock of any major city.

And in contrast to say St. Louis, where the housing stock is from the same age, but overwhelingly brick & more durable, Buffalo must lead urban America when it comes to the share of housing that's made of wood. Especially on the East Side, a lot of the houses are one & two story cottage & bungalow type houses thrown up hastily during the late 19th century. After a century & a half, the've become little more than shacks.

The Buffalo area has attracted even fewer new immigrants than most of the other cities that continue to lose population. The only way that places like Buffalo have any chance of coming back is to start attracting a decent share of the ten million or so new immigrants who've been coming to this country each decade. The new immigrants will do what the city can't, that is to start fixing up the housing stock, block-by-block. They'll also start opening new businesses & by their presence keep what's left of Buffalo's industrial base & attract new sectors.

Really, there's no need to re-invent the wheel here. Those are the proven strategies that other older cities in the Northeast & Midwest that have made comebacks have used. Bigger cities like NYC, & whole blocks in parts of the South Bronx & Brooklyn were abandoned just a few decades ago, Chicago, Boston, & Washington DC. Smaller cities like Jersey City, Providence, New Haven, Minneapolis, St. Paul. The challenge that many of these cities have been facing is just the opposite of Buffalo, the lack of housing.

Particularly with current challenges we face now with energy, sprawl, & lack of sustainability, it just seems to make more sense to refill older cities like Buffalo than to continiue to promote Sunbelt sprawl. As part of any national immigration reform, lets provide incentives for new immigrants to settle in places like Buffalo rather than say Pheonix!
wonderful ideas, but it kind of relates to what I said in the Niagara Falls thread.

Im sure the attitudes of the people in charge of Buffalo are a little more easy going than in the Falls but there are still going to be challenges.

Why would an immigrant want to move to Buffalo from Africa when crosses are being burned in front lawns.

See what I mean?
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Old July 8th, 2008, 05:28 AM   #8
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Buffalo does actually have a decent size & growing population of recent African immigrants, but that's beside the point. One incident of cross-burning is one too many and is quite embarrassing for our city, no doubt, but I don't think it's going to affect whatever little in-migration Buffalo has unless there is some kind of pattern developing.
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Old July 8th, 2008, 05:32 AM   #9
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Buffalo does actually have a decent size & growing population of recent African immigrants, but that's beside the point. One incident of cross-burning is one too many and is quite embarrassing for our city, no doubt, but I don't think it's going to affect whatever little in-migration Buffalo has unless there is some kind of pattern developing.
good point but when they get here they are going to see that mentality.
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Old July 8th, 2008, 05:53 AM   #10
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Buffalo will come back. The inner cores of America's cities are just starting to get hit pretty good with development...some cities more than others. Buffalo needs to do like alot of older cities: Take advantage of your older abandoned buildings and bring them back into commerce. Don't tear them down. It will happen. Buffalo will be fine. It's going through the urban cycle. We started to witness the City of New Orleans come back just after 2000, and then, of course, we had Katrina, which set us back and changed priorities, but, even with Katrina and recovery now in full force, we are seeing the same trends return to Downtown that we were seeing develop pre-Katrina. Renovations galore Downtown have returned. The high price of gasoline could be a blessing in disguise for many of America's older cities that have inner-city issues.
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Old July 8th, 2008, 04:19 PM   #11
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Now is a good time to buy some of these properties and FLIP 'em!

. . . or is that a bad idea?
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Old July 8th, 2008, 04:47 PM   #12
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I just looked at this area on Google Streetview. It looks very rough.
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Old July 8th, 2008, 04:50 PM   #13
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welcome all the polish potential immigrants to these empty houses
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Old July 8th, 2008, 05:44 PM   #14
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Sadly, I'd be surprised if every major Northern city didn't have at least 10,000 abandoned houses.
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Old July 8th, 2008, 06:54 PM   #15
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Now is a good time to buy some of these properties and FLIP 'em!

. . . or is that a bad idea?
judge for yourself

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Old July 10th, 2008, 05:37 AM   #16
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Quote:
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Sadly, I'd be surprised if every major Northern city didn't have at least 10,000 abandoned houses.
It's not only Northern cities...but any city that's been a large city for at least 100 years would have a decent number of abandoned houses, especially if the city has seen any significant population declines. 100 years seems like enough time for many different areas of a city to become popular/experience growth, then experience decline and eventually decay. In Atlanta, most of the problem is found around in-town neighborhoods - many of which are recently seeing gentrification. But there is a huge growing problem in suburbs because of large numbers of forclosures. There are also abandoned home problems in cities like Memphis, New Orleans, Charlotte, etc.

Abandoned Atlanta homes:
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2400400471/

image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2400405521/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/

image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/
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Old July 10th, 2008, 01:36 PM   #17
ChrisZwolle
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Those old homes should be demolished and replaced by new ones.
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Old July 10th, 2008, 03:20 PM   #18
skydive
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homes like these makes Dubai look so modern, what kind of lucky people live in these houses
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Old July 10th, 2008, 04:13 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeimieLvr View Post
It's not only Northern cities...but any city that's been a large city for at least 100 years would have a decent number of abandoned houses, especially if the city has seen any significant population declines. 100 years seems like enough time for many different areas of a city to become popular/experience growth, then experience decline and eventually decay. In Atlanta, most of the problem is found around in-town neighborhoods - many of which are recently seeing gentrification. But there is a huge growing problem in suburbs because of large numbers of forclosures. There are also abandoned home problems in cities like Memphis, New Orleans, Charlotte, etc.

Abandoned Atlanta homes:
image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2400400471/

image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2400405521/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/

image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/rkemp/2...n/photostream/
interesting pictures
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Old July 10th, 2008, 04:41 PM   #20
WeimieLvr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skydive View Post
homes like these makes Dubai look so modern, what kind of lucky people live in these houses

Well...no one lives in these houses - they are ABANDONED.
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