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Old May 1st, 2009, 12:30 PM   #61
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Olympic wasteland warning
1 May, 2009
By Ruth Bloomfield

The design review panel tasked with overseeing the London 2012 Olympics has warned that the Olympic Park could become a “wasteland” unless urgent action is taken to work up plans for the sites earmarked for temporary buildings.

Paul Finch, chairman of Cabe’s London 2012 panel, said he feared landmark Olympic buildings could be left isolated like the Millennium Dome if better legacy plans were not put in place.

Finch was speaking after his panel — which is due to be wound up this summer — issued a scathing verdict on the Olympic media centre, describing the RPS Group-designed International Broadcast Centre (IBC) as a work of “extraordinary banality”.

Finch said there was a danger that once the Olympics had finished and the temporary buildings had been removed, there would be “huge gaping holes” in the park.

“The big concern is that it will be a bit like the Millennium Dome, surrounded by huge areas of wasteland with literally nothing there,” he said.

“This is something that is being worked on now, but if you look at the Olympic site and consider what the map will look like a couple of months after the games once all the temporary facilities have been taken out, there are going to be an awful lot of great big gaps in the site… this is really the big challenge now.”

The London 2012 panel’s verdict on the media centre — the last major venue to be reviewed —described the IBC as a potential blight on Olympic legacy.

It said that more work was also needed to improve the “large monolithic block” of the other main media centre building, the Allies & Morrison-designed Main Press Centre.

Speaking about the IBC, the panel said: “In our view it is simply not good enough. “We would go so far as to say that its continued presence would blight, rather than enhance, the Olympic legacy.”

However, the ODA said the building was supposed to be functional and practical, and that over the last six months its cost — funded from the public purse — had been reduced to £355 million.
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Old May 27th, 2009, 04:12 PM   #62
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American regeneration expert is named to build Olympics legacy
Matthew Beard
27.05.09

The deputy mayor of Philadelphia was today named as the £200,000-a-year chief of the company chosen to deliver a legacy for the Olympic Park.

Urban development expert Andrew Altman will be responsible for attracting private investment in the 600-hectare park near Stratford to ensure it does not become a burden to the taxpayer after the 2012 Games.

As head of the “2012 legacy delivery company” established by London Mayor Boris Johnson, Mr Altman must find long-term tenants for the sports venues and developers to deliver thousand houses at the site.

He was recommended by Richard Rogers, the Mayor's architecture adviser. His appointment comes five months after he was named as a deputy mayor for planning and economic development in his home town of Philadelphia.

Mr Altman led the private sector regeneration of a swathe of waterfront in Washington DC, similar to the Olympic Park in that it had been dominated by industrial sites and had a history of deprivation.

His CV also includes public sector experience with senior planning roles in Washington, Los Angeles and Oakland.

Mr Johnson said: “Transforming this area into a thriving new district of London is one of the biggest regeneration projects in Europe. Andrew Altman is a big-hitter with his impressive record in leading and delivering huge development and regeneration projects in some of the largest cities of the US.”
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Old May 28th, 2009, 12:01 PM   #63
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Is there ANYTHING British about London 2012 other than taxpayer's money ?
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Old May 28th, 2009, 03:01 PM   #64
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Your Mum
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Old May 28th, 2009, 09:55 PM   #65
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Old May 30th, 2009, 08:56 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishKevin View Post
Is there ANYTHING British about London 2012 other than taxpayer's money ?
Well you've certainly provided the custom Great British moan to the whole thing. It's good to know then that the British always pull through in the end and will provide something unique and special so that everyone will have a spine-tingling moment come games-time.
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Old May 31st, 2009, 03:08 AM   #67
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Quote:
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Your Mum

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Old June 2nd, 2009, 10:09 AM   #68
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So that's a no then.
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Old June 2nd, 2009, 10:21 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishKevin View Post
So that's a no then.
Yep, there are absolutely no British companies or people working on the Olympics.
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Old June 2nd, 2009, 10:40 AM   #70
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Well if anyone expects mature trees in a brand new park they're out of touch with reality itself.Having said that,the few examples I've seen in bringing in SEMI-mature trees have been successful.Notably in the middle east and shopping malls.

I'm sure the park will look just fine and anyone with any common sense knows there's no such thing as instant mature landscaping.We know how to do parks.

Hmmm....wonder how much a giant artificial London Plane would cost. :-)
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Old June 4th, 2009, 11:50 PM   #71
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Olympic site links to national waterways with new East London lock
Ashling O’Connor
From Times Online
June 5, 2009

For decades an intricate web of rivers and canals in East London has been populated by abandoned shopping trolleys, old tyres and a few stubborn anglers casting their lines between the industrial flotsam.

But a new era beckons for the Bow Back Rivers and tributaries of the River Lee as city planners try to entice visitors to a revitalised waterfront envisaged as the Amsterdam of the East End.

The ambitious vision takes a step towards reality with the opening of Three Mills Lock, the first lock to be built in London in 20 years. The £22 million project links a forgotten 3½-mile system of waterways around the Olympic Park in Stratford to the 2,200-mile national inland network that stretches from Bath to Ripon, North Yorkshire.

The opening of the “green gateway” means that barges, water taxis and pleasure cruisers could travel around the country before entering the Thames and mooring near the Olympic site.

RELATED LINKS
Canals to carry materials for Olympic site
Westfield has ongoing vision for Olympic site
Water will be one mode of transport for Olympic spectators in 2012. But the long-term aim of the project is to attract new inhabitants with a model of sustainable living made possible by holding back the tide to create a relatively constant water level.

Proposals include a “village of narrow boats” and a clutch of permanent moorings near the stadium.

Richard Rutter, the British Waterways regeneration manager, said: “Imagine the waterways of Holland and Belgium . . . We want to see riverside cafes, market boats, people hiring punts and materials being loaded from small wharves to be taken off for recycling. There is a massive demand in London for living on water and we need to meet it.”

Until then, it requires imagination to see past the graffiti, discarded beer cans and heavy brush on a stretch of brown water behind a Tesco carpark by the A12 in Bromley-by-Bow. Planners promise a transformation.

“We will have new towpaths and regrade the landscape so that it is less intimidating. People haven’t been able to get close to the water until now because industry has backed on to it,” Richard Jackson, the environment manager for the Olympic Delivery Authority, said.

Initial traffic through the new 62m (200ft) lock, with twin hydraulic water control gates and a fish pass, will be 350-tonne barges carrying construction materials in and waste out of the Olympic park.

Extensive dredging — removing 30,000 tonnes of silt, gravel and rubble — created a 2.4m-deep channel capable of transporting 12,000 tonnes of cargo a week. Olympic chiefs say that this equates to taking 1,200 lorry journeys off local roads each week, saving up to 4,000 tonnes of carbon emissions.

Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London, said: “By shifting noisy, dusty and heavily polluting freight vehicles from busy roads on to water, we can free up traffic and drastically improve the quality of our environment.”

The Bow Back Rivers, covering an area the size of the City, are one of nine national restoration priorities for British Waterways.

Major navigation works between 1931 and 1935 led to peak freight traffic of two million tonnes a year, but bombing during the Second World War devastated the East End and the rise of rail and road curtailed investment in the waterways, which fell into disrepair.

After 2012, it is predicted that use of the waterways could reduce local carbon emissions by 440 tonnes a year and generate 160,000 KWh of hydro power through a restored tidal mill capable of powering up to 40 homes or lighting the local towpaths.
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Old June 6th, 2009, 11:53 AM   #72
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[QUOTE=DarJoLe;37771100]Olympic site links to national waterways with new East London lock
Ashling O’Connor
From Times Online
June 5, 2009

For decades an intricate web of rivers and canals in East London has been populated by abandoned shopping trolleys, old tyres and a few stubborn anglers casting their lines between the industrial flotsam.

But a new era beckons for the Bow Back Rivers and tributaries of the River Lee as city planners try to entice visitors to a revitalised waterfront envisaged as the Amsterdam of the East End.

The ambitious vision takes a step towards reality with the opening of Three Mills Lock, the first lock to be built in London in 20 years. The £22 million project links a forgotten 3½-mile system of waterways around the Olympic Park in Stratford to the 2,200-mile national inland network that stretches from Bath to Ripon, North Yorkshire.

The opening of the “green gateway” means that barges, water taxis and pleasure cruisers could travel around the country before entering the Thames and mooring near the Olympic site.

RELATED LINKS
Canals to carry materials for Olympic site
Westfield has ongoing vision for Olympic site
Water will be one mode of transport for Olympic spectators in 2012. But the long-term aim of the project is to attract new inhabitants with a model of sustainable living made possible by holding back the tide to create a relatively constant water level.

Proposals include a “village of narrow boats” and a clutch of permanent moorings near the stadium.

Richard Rutter, the British Waterways regeneration manager, said: “Imagine the waterways of Holland and Belgium . . . We want to see riverside cafes, market boats, people hiring punts and materials being loaded from small wharves to be taken off for recycling. There is a massive demand in London for living on water and we need to meet it.”

Until then, it requires imagination to see past the graffiti, discarded beer cans and heavy brush on a stretch of brown water behind a Tesco carpark by the A12 in Bromley-by-Bow. Planners promise a transformation.

“We will have new towpaths and regrade the landscape so that it is less intimidating. People haven’t been able to get close to the water until now because industry has backed on to it,” Richard Jackson, the environment manager for the Olympic Delivery Authority, said.



I live in a town that already has this and it's great.We don't need to look to Europe for this as we've always had it. Excellent idea for London although doesn't ' Little Venice' already have narrowboats ? Never call them Houseboats by the way.The owners are offended by that.

The Punts are a great idea too but then I come from Cambridge ;-)
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Old June 10th, 2009, 12:09 PM   #73
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Press Release

Mayor of London Boris

2012 legacy rising steadily from the ground as new homes for Londoners take shape
8-6-2009 292

The Mayor of London Boris Johnson revealed today that London’s 2012 legacy plans are firmly on track, with construction of the Olympic Village well advanced since the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) began building work a year ago. The Village, which lies adjacent to the Olympic Park site in the heart of east London, will provide first-class accommodation for athletes during the 2012 Games, before being transformed into thousands of new homes for Londoners.

Another major landmark has been reached with the start of work on the Chobham Academy - a world-class education campus to be built within the Olympic Village. With spaces for 1,800 students aged three - 19, the Academy will ensure that the local community and future residents not only live in a brand new, thriving district, but have access to world-class education facilities for a range of needs, including nursery, primary and secondary schools within the development.

In Walthamstow tonight, at a special Olympics-themed debate organised by the Mayor, Londoners will discover how the London Games are already delivering many other lasting benefits to the capital. With the help of over 1,000 workers currently on the Olympic Village site, seven of the 11 residential blocks that will make up the Village are starting to take shape and make their mark on the east London skyline. Work is also complete on key parts of the new infrastructure to create transport links between the Village and the surrounding communities. This includes the lifting into place of two major railway bridges and new railway sidings to allow delivery of construction materials by rail to minimise congestion and pollution in east London.

In addition to the 11,000 workers, including many local people, who are expected to be employed on the Olympic Park and Olympic Village sites at the peak of construction, 20,000 training opportunities will be provided over the next five years in a range of construction related skills. These opportunities will allow Londoners to develop the right skills to continue to help deliver the venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Games and other large-scale projects taking place across the region, such as Stratford City and Crossrail.

People attending the debate will also be able to have their say on all aspects of the 2012 legacy planned for east London.

The Mayor said:

“This is a very welcome landmark and marks major progress in the lasting regeneration of the East End. We now have a very clear vision and direction for our legacy, which is being expertly managed through the 2012 legacy delivery company. The ODA is making terrific progress and our vision of a vibrant, thriving district of new communities surrounded by beautiful parklands and reclaimed waterways with outstanding sporting, educational and cultural facilities, is taking shape. The 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games will deliver much more than just six weeks of sport and it is clear from progress to date that the future for this previously deprived area is spectacularly bright.”

Sebastian Coe, Chair of the London 2012 Organising Committee, said: “Our vision for London 2012 is to use the power of the Games to inspire lasting change – and leaving a legacy for generations of Londoners is a key part of our promise. With the Olympic Park now already starting to shape the East London skyline, everyone involved in this project is working towards delivering a positive sporting, social, economic and environmental legacy for our capital city. The employment, skills, training and business opportunities we have already created, along with the new homes and sporting facilities we are building, are ensuring we are delivering the 2012 legacy right now. I’m proud that sport has been the catalyst for this transformation.”

Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) Chairman John Armitt said: “The Olympic Village will be one of the strongest legacies from the Games, delivering world-class accommodation for athletes in 2012 and creating essential new housing for new and existing communities for generations to come. Along with the thousands of new homes that are rapidly taking shape, the Village will also deliver a range of community facilities and the start of work on a world-class new education campus within the Village is another significant milestone.”
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Old June 12th, 2009, 12:29 PM   #74
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Olympic bosses to rethink 10,000-home legacy plan
12 June 2009
By Joey Gardiner

Plans for Olympic park after 2012, including conversion of stadium into school, may be altered

Olympic bosses have decided to rework the development plan for the Olympic site after 2012, four months after it was launched by London mayor Boris Johnson and Olympics minister Tessa Jowell.

This will include looking again at the legacy use of the Olympic stadium, which was to be used as an athletics stadium and sports-themed school.

A well-placed source close to the 2012 legacy delivery company understands that Baroness Ford, the recently appointed chair of the organisation, wants to have a “second look” at the masterplan that was launched in February.

This laid out plans for 10,000 homes, commercial developments that will create 10,000 jobs, and using the stadium as a school.

The review follows the departure of Tom Russell, head of the London Development Agency’s (LDA) Olympic Legacy Directorate, last month. Russell was in charge of drawing up the masterplan, as well as instigating the process that led to the formation of the Olympic legacy company.

Russell appointed a consortium of architects made up of EDAW, Allies and Morrison and KCAP to develop the masterplan.

“If they want to look at it again, then I welcome it and I’m not surprised”
Conor McAuley, Newham council
Ford was appointed to chair the as yet unnamed company in April. Last month Andrew Altman, the deputy mayor of Philadelphia, was named chief executive of the body, which will begin work later in the summer.

The review will come despite the fact that a planning application for the legacy is due to be submitted in the summer.

The source said: “There’s been good feedback on the masterplan, but we want it to be more ambitious, crisper – and it’s important that the new chief executive has some input.

“This will include looking at how we might use the stadium, which has to be worthy of a second look. The view is we’re not doing anything like enough with the sporting legacy.”

Separate sources said the original framework was viewed as “pedestrian” by the local boroughs. Conor McAuley, head of regeneration at Newham council, said: “If they want to look at it again, then I welcome it and I’m not surprised.”

A spokesperson for the LDA said following the February consultation that there would “inevitably be some further alterations” to the masterplan.

THE BEST LAID PLANS
Building revealed in February that the Olympic stadium was to be turned into a new type of sports-themed school following the London Olympics.
After agonising for two years over whether to sell the venue to a football club, the Olympic Delivery Authority finally decided that the cost of removing the running track was too much.

Instead, the stadium was to be reduced from 80,000 seats to 25,000 and used as an occasional athletics venue. Other parts of it were to be redeveloped into a “studio school” for children with special needs, using the Olympic heritage to inspire children who were struggling in the state sector.
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Old June 12th, 2009, 09:54 PM   #75
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Is this part of the legacy?

I guess the legacy will also include some of the new or refurbished training venues that will be dotting up around the country.

In my little town just over an hour from London, we're getting a fantastic 50m Pool on the back of the games. We were getting a new pool anyway but it was extended in the hope that it will be chosen as a training base for one of the visiting nations in 2012. Don't see why it shouldn't as it looks fantastic and it doesn't open until next month...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northamptonshir..._feature.shtml





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Old June 18th, 2009, 01:13 PM   #76
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‘New vision’ needed for the Olympic legacy, says Rogers
18 June, 2009 | By Kieran Long

Richard Rogers has warned that the Olympic legacy could be wasted if a new vision for the site and the surrounding Lower Lea Valley in London does not emerge soon

Speaking at a meeting of crossbench peers at the House of Lords this week, Rogers said: ‘I’m concerned about the overall strategy [to the Olympic legacy]. In the Thames Gateway we have seen the opportunity lost because of an appalling standard of buildings. We need a vision [for the Lea Valley], because this will be here for hundreds of years.’

Baroness Ford, appointed in April as chair of the 2012 legacy delivery company, admitted that her powers beyond the Olympic park were limited. ‘There’s a red line around the park, but I’ve never been one to observe red lines,’ she said. She also suggested that a new version of the legacy masterplan would be drawn up, and that the current version, by EDAW, Allies and Morrison and KCAP, ‘was by no means the finished article.’ She added that if the process took an extra six months, it would be worth it.

The meeting brought together a high-level group to discuss concerns that the legacy lacked strategic thinking. The launch of an All Party Parliamentary Group of Urban Regeneration, Sport and Culture was announced, which will look at the legacy of events such as the Olympics, Commonwealth Games and the European Cultural Capital.
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Old August 13th, 2009, 10:33 PM   #77
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London 2012: designing for legacy
13 August, 2009 | By Andrea Klettner


Olympic Park in legacy mode

AJ SPECIAL REPORT: How plans for the Olympic Park are shaping up under legacy chief Baroness Margaret Ford

When London won the 2012 Olympic Games in 2005, its success was based on the promise of a legacy – a new East London providing future-proof housing design, thousands of jobs, improved transport links and new communities.

As former London mayor Ken Livingstone puts it: ‘I only bid because of the regeneration potential, otherwise we could never have justified it. I would like to see allotments set among sports pitches and an area that allows people to walk from Enfield right down to the Thames.’

But with three years until the big event, questions remain about what exactly will happen to the Olympic Park once the Games are over. Just a few weeks into the job and newly appointed legacy chief Baroness Margaret Ford has already torn into the existing post-Games plans to scale down Populous’ 80,000-seat Olympic Stadium into a smaller, 25,000-capacity version. Ford would prefer to keep the arena at its full size, although it is doubtful she will be allowed to force this through without consensus from her board, due to be appointed in September.

While more certain plans exist for the other Olympic venues (see map), there are still large chunks of land in the park masterplan – some designated for temporary infrastructure and venues during the Games – that remain blank in legacy mode. According to one source close to the project, ‘there is a map doing the rounds with big white areas on it that no one knows what to do with yet’.

Ford, who heads up the Olympic Park Legacy Company, admits there is still a lot of work to be done on the park’s legacy masterplan, due to be submitted for planning in early 2010. ‘A lot of excellent work has been done in planning the legacy up to this point,’ says Ford. ‘But there should be a greater emphasis on celebrating the sporting legacy we will inherit from the 2012 Games.

‘Just as South Kensington is a destination for museums, the Olympic Park should be a visitor destination for a unique sporting experience – whether you play sport or not,’ adds Ford.

What has been decided is that the park will be divided into five main quarters, each with its own residential areas and community facilities including marinas, schools, nurseries and parklands. According to Markus Appenzeller, design co-ordinator for the Olympic Legacy Masterplan Framework and a director at KCAP Architects, ‘each housing area will have a certain focus, like the family-orientated area in the north’. Ford places emphasis on the parkland aspect of the site: ‘The Olympic site will be defined in legacy by the use of its parkland. We will inherit one of Europe’s largest urban parks and I want it to be beloved by Londoners in the same way Central Park is in New York.’

MJ Long, chair of CABE’s masterplan design review panel, doesn’t think the lack of clarity regarding the legacy plan is something to worry about. ‘Plans might seem a bit vague right now, but no one is hiding anything or being cagey. It’s really just all happening as we speak,’ explains Long. ‘That’s not to say there aren’t unresolved questions,’ she continues. ‘For example, during the Games there will be extra toilets and hamburger stands and we need to decide what to do with these. All options are being looked at – they might be recycled, whole buildings might be moved to somewhere else, or their long-term use might simply change on site.’

Ford agrees: ‘The development of the Olympic Park site will take place over a period of 25 years and beyond. We will be working with the Olympic Delivery Authority [ODA] and the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games to ensure we can begin work on site as soon as possible after the 2012 Paralympics has finished.’

One option is using spaces that will not be immediately developed to house cultural events, giving the public access to parts of the site that would otherwise be closed. ‘It could be similar to the Potsdamer Platz programme in Berlin, where there was a big exhibition hall to show people what it would look like,’ says Appenzeller. ‘The area was also opened up in the summer and cultural events were held there for the public.’

The shape of the masterplan is not the only aspect of the legacy plan still undecided. What is also unclear is how planning and design vetting for the park will work. The area currently falls under the jurisdiction of the ODA, but it is hoped that planning conditions for the park in legacy mode, which straddles four London boroughs, will be decided by a joint planning committee. Newham Council’s divisional director for the 2012 Games, Nick Williams, says: ‘Anything we do will be coloured by what the aspirations for the park are, and in legacy the obvious place for these decisions to be made is with a central committee made up of representatives from all the boroughs.’

As for design delivery, Appenzeller says: ‘You can have the nicest plan, but if the delivery mechanism isn’t properly in place then you won’t get the quality you set out for.’ The responsibility of ensuring appropriate designs are picked for permanent structures will fall to the legacy company – but how this will be done remains uncertain. ‘The Olympic Park Legacy Company has to define its own agenda. Within it there has to be some sort of design supervision or design control,’ says Appenzeller. ‘This could come in the form of a CABE-type review, or a separate department within the company that focuses on design. It’s all very much in discussion.’

The future of most larger venues, whose delivery is the responsibility of the ODA, is more clear-cut. Zaha Hadid’s Aquatics Centre will be slightly downsized, while the VeloPark – comprising the Hopkins-designed, 6,000-seat Velodrome, road circuit and BMX track – will remain very close to its Games-mode design.

The Media Centre, designed by Allies and Morrison with RPS, will be eventually transformed into a commercial structure. CABE has had its issues with early designs for the Media Centre, effectively a giant warehouse, and exactly how the building will be successfully split remains to be decided. But it has been agreed that the ‘modular’ design will be chopped up and replaced in phases by ‘permanent structures for different uses’.

For now, much of the detail regarding the legacy plan is a work in progress. To fulfil their brief, the Olympic Park Legacy Company will need to form a robust long-term strategy – one that allows for change and evolution, but keeps to its original agenda.

Legacy plans for the permanent Olympic venues

Olympic Park legacy map



1. Olympic Stadium

Architect Populous
Games mode Host venue with 80,000-seats for opening/closing ceremonies and track and field events
Legacy May become a smaller 25,000-seat venue, or remain at full size
Issues Baroness Ford has questioned the reasoning behind building a half-temporary stadium, especially since the UK is hosting the 2015 rugby World Cup and bidding for the 2018 football World Cup
Certainty of plans 20%


2. Aquatics Centre

Architect Zaha Hadid
Games mode 17,500-capacity venue hosting swimming and diving events
Legacy Wings will be removed to reduce capacity to 2,500
Issues Spiralling costs, up to £300 million from £75 million, were brought under control by simplifying the design. A £40 million, post-Games, add-on leisure centre and public wave pool was ditched last November
Certainty of plans 90%

3. Media Centre

Architect Allies and Morrison
Games time Host venue for 20,000-strong international press and broadcast media
Legacy Designed to be converted, in phases, into commercial spaces by being dismantled and rebuilt
Issues Essentially a gigantic metal warehouse. Innovative cladding and reworking of the facade has dispelled most fears that it will sit as an eyesore at the edge of the park. However, no tenants have been found post-2012
Certainty of plans 10%

4. VeloPark

Architect Hopkins
Games mode Host to all cycling events. Includes the 6,000-seat Velodrome
Legacy The Velodrome and road circuit will remain intact. BMX and mountain bike courses will be redesigned
Issues Costs escalated early on because the site was used as a landfill in Victorian times, resulting in a huge clean-up operation
Certainty of plans 95%

5. Eton Manor

Architect Stanton Williams
Games mode Training venues
Legacy Stanton Williams is responsible for turning these three areas into a 3,000-capacity hockey stadium, indoor and outdoor tennis courts and allotments
Issues The last major venues to be designed in the park, but also the least challenging
Certainty of plans 99%

6. Handball Arena

Architect Make
Games mode 7,000-capacity venue hosting preliminary handball and Paralympic goalball
Legacy The first venue to be opened in legacy mode, the arena will be used as a multi-sports venue and will host cultural, entertainment and business events
Issues Making the design as flexible as possible in legacy mode
Certainty of plans 99%

7. Olympic Village

Architects include Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, CF Møller, Denton Corker Marshall, dRMM, DSDHA, Glenn Howells Architects, Ian Simpson Architects, Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands, Make, Niall McLaughlin Architects, Panter Hudspith Architects, Patel Taylor and Piercy Conner
Games mode Home to 17,000 Olympic athletes in 11 residential blocks
Legacy Will be converted into 2,818 apartments, with 1,379 taken on by Triathlon Homes as affordable housing. The rest will be sold to developers for private resale
Issues The Olympic Village is currently owned by the taxpayer, so a value-for-money sale to future developers is essential. The conversion to apartments will take three years to complete
Certainty of plans 50%

8. Basketball Arena

Architects Sinclair Knight Merz, Wilkinson Eyre and KSS Design Group
Games mode 12,000-seat venue for basketball events
Legacy The ODA plans to recycle the majority of the structure. Plans to reuse it as a market hall have been ditched
Issues Designed as a temporary venue, it is likely to be pulled down
Certainty of plans 50%

A-E. Other temporary venues and infrastructure

Although the builders’ merchant and training facilities (A) and the fuel farm and waste consolidation centre (E) will revert to parkland in legacy mode, the future of the concrete batching plants (B), the Olympic Park health centre (C) and the logistics and command offices (D) remains uncertain
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Old August 13th, 2009, 10:44 PM   #78
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A very good, balanced read.
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Old August 16th, 2009, 06:29 PM   #79
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London 2012 | Regeneration | Host Boroughs

Ken Livingstone: "I only bid because of the regeneration potential, otherwise we could never have justified it."

With the Olympics three years away, and the weather being nice this week-end, I had a very long walk through the areas surrounding the Olympic Park to see how things are shaping up. I was impressed and very disappointed at the same time.

The Olympic Park island site is impressive and appears well organised. After having seens it from so close I am convinced the ODA is doing an excellent job; I have no doubts left that they will deliver a fantastic park and solid infrastructure.

However, at the same time I was very disappointed that the Olympic project does not appear to being taken advantage of by the host boroughs (Newham, Waltham Forest, Hackney and Tower Hamlets). There are some shockingly poor and neglected neighbourhoods around the olympic site and it really strikes you when you take the time to walk through them. The public realm ranges from very bad to average.

For sure there is a considerable amount of investment in public transport, but bar the capacity upgrade of Stratford Regional, all of these projects would have gone ahead as well without the Olympics.

What I was looking for was any sign that the host boroughs were leveraging on the Olympics to clean up the poor public realm in some of the finge areas. With only three years to go, there was not the smallest sign of this. In that respect, they could as well have located the Olympics anywhere. It is an island site and there are no visible spill-over effects. It appears nothing is being done about the poor state of public housing, potholed streets, shabby pavements, poorly maintained communal spaces, etc. Even Westminster is currently doing more with its pavement upgrade programme for the Olympics!

I then had a look on the internet sites of the Host Boroughs to see whether something is about to happen. Again, big disappointment. They all seem to suffer from the "London Thames Gateway Development Corporation Disease", i.e. perpetual debating groups, multiple publications, but no action on the ground whatsoever.

Newham clearly comes out the worst, a lot of spin and nice pictures of politicians but nothing concrete.
http://2012games.newham.gov.uk/2012games/

Hackney comes out second worst, a complete internet site with aspirations and spin, but OK they are going to invest £3 mio in upgrading the facilities of the Hackney Marshes.
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/2012-games.htm

Tower Hamlets seems to have just woken up with its High Street 2012 plan but it is not clear whether this is just another document (and internet site) or whether they will do something.
http://www.towerhamlets.gov.uk/lgsl/..._olympics.aspx

Waltham Forest seems to have done the most work, with its Northern Finge Plans, but it is unclear whether these are just publications or whether they will also execute them.
http://www.walthamforest.gov.uk/inde...pic-fringe.htm

The LDA clearly has too many employees; the number of publications and masterplans are incredible, but without any sign that anything is actually going to be done. They even had the time to make an internet site dedicated to the topic, but again without any indication of what will be done. I assume that in July 2012 they will still be launching new masterplans.
http://www.legacy-now.co.uk/designin...ound-the-park/

With only three years to go, one would have assumed there to be a clear plan of how to address some of the omni-present neglect in the fringe areas such that there would be a visible spill-over effect of the Olympics. Whilst the public realm is only one aspect of the regeneration, it is the most visible one. It seems that the Host Boroughs are missing a unique chance to improve the opportunities and environment for the existing residents and businesses, to attract new businesses and residents and to portray themselves to the country and the world as a dynamic, ambitious, up-and-coming, progressive and pleasant area of London.

Last edited by JGG; August 16th, 2009 at 06:50 PM.
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Old August 16th, 2009, 06:45 PM   #80
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Most of what you say will not happen until later next year. Much of the regeneration programmes that the LDA mention will now take longer thanks to Boris slashing their budget. The regeneration potential for East London that Ken used as impetus for hosting the Olympics was always a long term goal, many of the masterplans are looking forward to 2040 and how the locale will be shaped once the Games have gone.
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