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A Feast of Family Heirloom Recipes– Lillian Borromeo’s Living Legacy


Thank God for extended vacations! Just when you thought Holy Week was over, an extra holiday mercifully happened. And so our stay-cation allowed us one last food trip.
Along with dear friends, we made our way to Mexico,Pampanga to the home of Lillian Borromeo. A gracious lady who met me with a smile, a beso and a hug. A lunch spread was waiting for us on a buffet table cum banggerahan.




First, a pitcher of pandan water greeted us. No sugar, just the natural flavor of pandan. It sort of cleansed the palate, getting our taste buds ready for the feast. Atching Lillian prepared an array of traditional Calutong Capampangan (Kapampangan dishes): If my memory serves me right, we had: Suam na Mais (corn soup)Bobotung Asan (Steamed bangus in Tangle Sauce), Sisig Antiguo (Kapampangan Traditional-style Sisig), Ensaladang Paku (Fiddlefern Salad), Bringhi (Kapampangan style of the Spanish Paella), Fried Itu with buro (Catfish with fermented rice), Mixed veggies akin to chopsuey, a tokwa dish, Bulanglang (stew of backyard veggies), Tidtad (Kapampangan’s version of the pork blood stew or dinuguan) and Embutido . I think Atching was worried we’ll eat the table off, she added chicken adobo for good measure. For dessert, there was a bowl full of summer fruits, Panecillos de San Nicolas (San Nicolas Cookies) and Tibok-tibok (milk custard).
Hailed as the guardian and steward of Kapampangan Cuisine, Atching Lillian unselfishly shares her recipes by teaching in school, through a regional television show and as of late through her book ” Atching Lillian’s Heirloom Recipes “.
While I love all of it, my top choices are Tidtad, Tokwa, Sisig and Bringhi. Tidtad is not like the dinuguan I grew up with where the pork blood is part of the sauce or sabaw. Instead, they add clotted pork blood and sliced into cubes, resembling liver. I tried to balance all that porky goodness with the veggies, which could not possibly be eaten without rice!


Unlike other dining by appointment- this includes cooking demo, further adding appreciation to the culinary history not only of her family but of Pampanga as a whole. A few steps away is her personal museum she calls Cusinang Matua (Old Kitchen). Here, you will see a bric brac of her family’s history. Most interesting are the cooking implements, wooden cookie molds, antique rolling pins, copper pots that she inherited from her mother and grandmother.

She showed us how easy it was to make San Nicolas cookies from mixing to gently kneading the dough to flattening it on the cookie mold with a rolling pin. The Kapampangan Brazo de Mercedes aka Brazo de Mais or Brazo de la Reina is distinct because of the creamed corned incorporated in the custard filling. This sort of reminds me of the corn maja blanca, only a bit richer because of the egg yolks. We also got to pipe the meringue with strokes that mimic the corn kernels when cooked.


What was thrilling for me was the use of her antique wooden cookie molds thereby making panecillos exactly the way they were made three centuries ago. Her collection of wooden cookie molds is inspiring me to start my own. Seriously.





We tried making our own cookies and ate the newly-cooked Brazo de Mais right there and then. I tried the other mold for making Dulce Prenda aka Hopiang Kapampangan or La Naval Pastry. Basically a deeper mold so you can put a ball of yema as filling. And to un-hinge it, you have to whack it hard on the table. THAT was fun.

The place is unpretentious, the way you would partake in a fiesta in someone’s backyard in the province. In truth, Atching Lillian is a celebrity in her own right—being a Maya Cookfest winner, a TV personality, a guest chef in hotels among other things. And yet, she is so unaffected, a lovely storyteller of the topic that she is most passionate about: Calutong Capampangan.

For those who would like to have a piece of this experience, there are reproductions of wooden cookie molds for sale. I did one more step and got myself her cookbook, with her autograph, of course!
Needless to say I am going back, and this time to try her breakfast fare.
Call her for your next foodie trip: 09157730788
“Friend” her on facebook: Key-in Atching Lillian Borromeo


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San Fernando, Pampanga Poblacion
Posted on April 23, 2012.

I had the opportunity to do a project in San Fernando, Pampanga and went around the poblacion taking photos showing transport and traffic conditions in the old city center. To many travelers, perhaps the San Fernando they know is associated with what they see along the Gapan-San Fernando-Olongapo Road (also known as Jose Abad Santos Ave along this stretch in the city) after exiting the NLEX. There is much commercial development along the stretch of the highway between NLEX and McArthur Highway and of course, around the exit itself as mall giants SM and Robinsons have branches there. The “real” San Fernando is located only a few kilometers south from GSO via McArthur and the poblacion reveals a lot about the heritage or old character of the city and perhaps its potential for restoration as an example of urban development during the Spanish times.

Following are a collection of photographs from field work that we did in the city. We took a walk around the principal roads including McArthur, Tiomico, Consunji, Gen. Hizon., Abad Santos and Limjoco. Tiomico eventually becomes the Capitol Blvd. as it leads to the provincial capitol complex while Consunji becomes Sto. Nino Viejo when traversed westbound. The latter becomes Lazatin Blvd, which crosses GSO towards the north. Gen. Hizon appears to be the original alignment of the Manila North Road (McArthur), which passed through the heart of the city. Sometime in the not so distant past, a bypass road was constructed as traffic became constricted in the poblacion and many travelers not bound for San Fernando were inconvenienced by the congestion. This is clear from the maps of the area.

Poblacion preview
– The San Fernando cathedral as seen from the approach of the bridge along Gen. Hizon Ave. The bridge itself appears to be an old one. It is a two-lane structure and its lamp posts reminded me of a similar bridge in Melaka, Malaysia I saw only this year.​

The cathedral as seen from the bridge
– the junction immediately after the bridge is Gen. Hizon’s intersection with Consunji Ave. The latter is one way eastbound so left turns are prohibited at the junction. Vehicles may go through towards Tiomico (the next junction right after the cathedral) or right where travelers will immediately see city hall on the right side of the road and just across from the cathedral; the typical set-up of most old towns in the Philippines.

Gen. Hizon Ave. towards Tiomico
– the commercial establishments around the cathedral are very similar to those you would in many other old cities and towns around the country. Pedestrians are supposed to take the arcade sidewalks just in front of the ground floors of the buildings on the left and underneath their second floors. These seem to be blocked by merchandise or stalls so some pedestrians take the street instead. The photo also shows typical on-street parking in the poblacion.

Pedestrian flow
– the photo shows pedestrians crossing Gen. Hizon from the commercial establishments on the left towards the cathedral. The photo also shows people using the walkways integrated with the buildings (arcade), providing shelters against the elements, in this case the scorching sun.

Rotonda?
– at what seems to be the end of Gen. Hizon is a curious set-up which functions as a rotonda. Tiomico is also a one way street (westbound) and there is another intersection just ahead in the photo after turning right from Gen. Hizon.

Off-set intersection
– Gen. Hizon actually continues as B. Mendoza Ave. (which eventually leads to a junction with McArthur to the north) from the junction that is identified by the 7-Eleven on one of its corners that is visible in the photo. The public market is just across from the building housing the convenience store.

City hall
– the building is just across from the cathedral and the parking problems in the city are clear from this photo alone. City halls generate a lot of traffic due to the transactions, meetings and other activities associated with the institution. On weekdays, most parking in front of the building and across at the cathedral are probably by people with business at city hall. During Sundays, parking would be for church-goers.

Walkways
– the arcade/pedestrian walkways I were referring to earlier are much like the one shown in the left of the photo in front of a shoe store. The set-up allows for pedestrians to be shielded from the elements as they should be able to walk comfortably without getting wet during the rainy season or exposed directly to the sun during the summer. The street on the right is Consunji and leads to the public market, part of which is just behind the yellow building.

Jose Abad Santos Street
– the stretch was closed to motor vehicles at the time we walked around the poblacion. There was a sports event at the time and the street was being used for races – note the writing along the zebra crossing indicating the starting line for the race.

Consunji by the market
– the one-way street is lined with commercial establishments and part of the street is used as parking, a common problem in other poblacions in similar cities.

Prohibition?
– this is Tiomico Street in the public market area. The sign on the lower left says 3-wheelers are not allowed along this stretch of the street and yet we found most of the vehicles to be exactly what is supposed to be prohibited – tricycles and pedicabs. The stretch could have been nice if it were developed into a pedestrian street instead with limited access to motor vehicles (perhaps for deliveries only?) much like those market streets in Japan.

Typical mayhem
– further down the street is a mix of people, bicycles, pedicabs, tricycles, and other motor vehicles. There’s potential here for re-development or transformation that would enable the revival of this commercial district that includes the public market.

Blast from the past
– aside from the typical tricycles and pedicabs providing for local public transport, we were a bit surprised that there were still calesas, or two-wheelers pulled by horses. At the time (2010), the kutseros or drivers charged PhP 10 to 20 (about 20 to 50 US cents) per passenger depending on the destination. These calesas are all registered with the local government, and they have license plates indicating their registration.

Queue
– most of the horses pulling the calesas looked healthy enough and well-cared for. The kutseros were kind enough to answer our inquiries about their operations. I think the city should carefully consider how to take advantage of its heritage/character to promote sustainable transport including walking, NMT and the calesas for moving around the poblacion and its immediate environs.

Two-seaters
– the passenger capacity for the calesas is two. To address the poop issue, there is a contraption just behind the horse and hanging under the carriage that catches dung and prevents it from being spilled unto the roads. I assume these are disposed of properly.

Alternative design
– the pedicabs in San Fernando are different from the conventional ones we see in other cities or towns. Noticeable from the photo is that this is not your regular bicycle with a sidecar set-up. These are fabricated 3-wheelers that seem to be sleeker if not more stable than the usual pedicabs we’ve seen.

Tiomico Street
– just after Gen. Hizon, one gets an idea of the challenges for transport and traffic in San Fernando. The one-way street has no pavement markings, obstructed signs (if any at all), no pedestrian sidewalks and vehicles each doing their own thing along the road (e.g., motorcycle zigzagging through traffic, jeepneys stopping anywhere, etc.).

Walkability
– people generally walk along the carriageway, as shown in the photo, due to a lack of proper facilities like sidewalks. Though there are remnants of zebra crossings, people also generally cross anywhere and so contribute to the mayhem along the streets. There was a proposal for a pedestrian overpass but such is so inappropriate given the narrow streets. No one will use such an overpass as it would be more an inconvenience to pedestrians. A more appropriate treatment would probably be traffic calming or other approaches that would prioritize pedestrians over motor vehicles in the poblacion area. The lot where jeepney terminal mentioned on the left side of the photo is now an SM mall.

Hazards
– the relocation of electric poles seem to have been an afterthought when they re-paved Tiomico. These are not easily seen at night and could lead to crashes should vehicles miscalculate their locations. The road drainage may be found beneath concrete covers on either side of the road such as those along which the people in the photo are walking over. These are supposed to be easier to maintain as crews can just lift the covers to remove blocks such as garbage.

Traffic mix
– I like this photo because it shows almost all modes of transport operating in the poblacion: calesas, pedicabs, bicycles, motorcycles, and jeepneys. Its a good thing trucks are banned from using these roads. Otherwise, traffic would be worse.

Junction
– approach to the junction of Tiomico, Lazatin Street (left) and Capitol Boulevard (right). There were no signs to indicate the approach to the intersection as well as for traffic control (e.g., stop or yield signs). There are also no pavement markings.​

Capitol
– the photo shows vehicles approaching from Capitol Boulevard, which comprise generous (wide) two lanes. Sidewalks were on either side of the boulevard except where there were driveways and parking spaces.

Junction
– approach to the junction of Lazatin St., Consunji Street (left) and Sto. Nino Viejo Road (right). Again, there are no signs and pavement markings are already weathered.

Old bridge
– there is a short, old bridge just after the junction. The bridge is over a creek connecting to the main river and has 4 lamp posts that are similar to the main bridge along Gen. Hizon, and perhaps the inspiration for the lamp posts along Consunji Street.

Consunji Street
– is also a two-lane, one way street. Some sections have pedestrian facilities like the sidewalk on the left. The pavement markings were already weathered but still visible during the daytime. There are also less electric poles along this street and the lamp posts are appropriate in design.

Heritage House
– the structure on the left is an ancestral house, of which there are many in the province of Pampanga and especially around San Fernando, which is one of the oldest towns in the province.

Recognition
– the marker by the National Historical Institute recognizes the structure as a Heritage House. The smaller plaque provides a description of the house and those who lived or used it, highlighting its significance. There are other heritage houses as well as old houses that have not been given such a distinction (family not prominent enough?) but which deserve preservation.

Future and present site
– this lot was being used by jeepneys as their terminal at the time of our field work. The lot is bounded by Tiomico St. in the northwest and Consunji St. in the southeast, and is where the recently opened SM City San Fernando is situated.

Approach from Consunji
– there are no pavement markings (yellow box) defining the intersection and no signs to help in traffic control.

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Arayat: Aring Sinukwan’s Mountain | A Guide to Hiking Mt. Arayat National Park

12 04 2012 text | Carla Ocampo
photography | Yo Muan, Carla Ocampo and Lester Valle
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LOCATION | TRAILHEAD: Mt. Arayat National Park | Bgy. San Juan Baño, Arayat, Pampanga​
ELEVATION | DIFFICULTY: 1,030 meters above sea level (MASL) | Class 2​
COORDINATES: 15°11’47.94″N 120°44’37.68″E​
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The Filipino hiker is quite unique. Beyond following the established Leave-No-Trace principles, we also add another facet to respecting the Great Outdoors.
With animistic spirituality, deeply ingrained in the Filipino psyche, we make it a point to pay our respects to deities — spirits — that may be inhabiting the trails we tread on.
Some offer silent prayers before the start of every trek. Some call out “Tabi po!” excusing themselves for disturbing the ground. Even the most hardened atheists — and Catholics! — among local hiking circles do not question these practices, if only in the name of camaraderie.
These spirits, it would seem, appreciate sincerity. For one, Aring Sinukwan (or, The King, Sinukwan) was such a benevolent deity during Team KT’s trek up his lushly vegetated home, Mount Arayat.
Perhaps, as a token for our hushed behavior, the spirit king and his daughter Mariang Sinukwan gifted us with great weather, a spectacular sunset, and a clear view of the farthest plains of Central Luzon.
But we’ll tell you the story later. For now, here are the particulars.
HOW TO GET THERE (COMMUTE)
Any bus going to Cabiao, Nueva Ecija would pass by the junction going to the Arayat National Park, but to be sure, there are buses around the Monumento Rotonda with direct trips to Arayat. Fare is at around PhP115.
An hour or so later, Manong Konduktor hollers, “BANYO!” and he’s not talking about bathroom breaks here. “Banyo” signals the village of San Juan Baño, a pretty busy village at the foot of Mount Arayat. This is your jump-off point, and when you’re backpacked, the bus would assume that you are hikers. ”Banyo!” would then become “BANYO! BUNDOK! BANYO! BUNDOK!”.
(For our foreign readers, “bundok” means mountain, and “banyo” or baño — ”bathroom” for Filipinos — loosely means “bather” or “baptist” in Spanish. Arayat is historically a Spanish colonial bailiwick)
THE ARAYAT NATIONAL PARK
You alight right in front of the jump-off junction, where tricycles are ready to take you to either the Barangay Hall, or the DENR Forest Ranger Station at the mountain’s trailhead. Either here or there, you register your names and get the services of a local guide.
But some hiking groups refuse to do this. There has been much ado about guide rates of late, because sadly, some locals would overcharge from the normal PhP500… to PhP1,000, even PhP1,200.
Even then, there may be no need for war paint and seething anger. As visitors, we can always politely decline and look for other locals. A LOT others are principled enough to guide you along the trails for PhP500. And truth be told, the services of an Arayat guide is priceless, because a team can easily get lost among the many twists and turns at the foot of the mountain. It could be enough to say that Maria and her father Sinukwan would not readily welcome you up their home — at least, not so fast.
THE HIKE
If you choose to be dropped off at the DENR Forest Ranger Station, then your trusty tricycle has just negotiated some kilometer-and-half worth of hike for you. That IS a huge energy saver.
From the Ranger Station, it would be around 6-7 hours before you reach the summit, factoring in the recommended hour-long rest stop at the Viewpoint, about 200 meters below the peak. For newbies, the trek could stretch up to 9 hours.
Following the trail to Magalang would lead you to the first — and probably the only — water source where you can refill your Nalgenes. But it could actually be too early into the hike; this water source is still within the flatlands surrounding Arayat, you may not even have emptied your containers halfway, just yet. But be warned that there are no other water sources along the trail all the way to the summit, so you may want to take your chances right here.
Arayat’s surrounding flatland is a maze of wagon roads and cattle trails; one wrong turn and you’re bound to lose one whole hour just trying to find your way back in the right direction. Sinukwan plays tricks in these parts; humility is recommended: that is, listen to your guide, or if you choose to go without one, at least do not hesitate to ask wandering locals for directions. The Arayat landscape has changed immensely in the past few years, it is almost unrecognizable even to hikers who have been there just five years ago.
Arayat’s trail is one of the freshest we’ve seen, probably owing to the fact that this mountain is seldom included in the immediate must-hike list of hobbyists.
During the first hours of the hike, you will be wading through high cogon, encountering charcoal pits and the occasional carabao along the way. This should all be in the morning, before the sun beats down hellishly; only a few stunted bushes and some scattered tamarind trees are here to shade you from intense rays.
Halfway up the slope, even as the forest thickens, Sinukwan burdens you with his most difficult challenge: radically steep elevation gain. Think: Maculot Tourist Trail, length times five. This goes on until the Viewpoint vicinity.
At the Viewpoint, which offers a narrow but inspiring view of the Pampanga River and its embracing plains, your team may hie off to lie on the beds of igneous rock that are surprisingly ergonomic. Eat your late lunch or take a power nap, your call.
THE VANDALS
But this mountain was not spared the insensitivity of hard-headed vandals who dare call themselves mountaineers. Utter disrespect of the Leave No Trace Principles? Again, we’re letting the pictures talk.
FINAL ASSAULT, AND THE ARAYAT SUMMIT
Here is one nice breather: the Viewpoint signals the last leg of the hike. Past the slightly technical rockface of this station, the assault to the summit is a friendly one. The steepness that characterized Arayat’s first 3/4 would give way to rolling terrain and relatively relaxed ambling, with short sections of sharp inclines every now and then. This is where you could find civet droppings from rock to rock, and hear many different bird calls, evidence of the fascinating, biodiverse population that has made Arayat its home.
The forest becomes quite thick in places; you would, at times, have to sweep aside vines and hanging branches that block your way. Thorny twigs would rip your jerseys. Fallen tree trunks would require some limbo rock. All in all, it is a very textured trek, with enough interesting elements to distract you from your exhaustion. Before you know it, you have actually reached the summit!
Arayat’s South Peak camp is a clearing surrounded by shady trees that protect you from the searing sun. You could very well afford to pitch your tents even at 2PM, or wake up quite late the next day for break-camp at noon.
SINUKWAN’S GIFTS: TEASER
One struggles for words to describe the gifts of grateful Maria and Aring Sinukwan, but to receive these requires no secret formula: behave like a true, courteous mountaineer (read, no boisterous shouting, no garbage flailing) and he will probably bless you with an enchanting — we could even say, bewitching — experience. Team KT’s next post will let you take a peek at this splendor.
 

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Legislation to restore veterans cemetery introduced

CLARK FREEPORT – United States Senators Kelly Ayotte and Mark Begich recently introduced a legislation aimed at restoring the Clark Veterans Cemetery, the resting place of more than 8,300 American service men and their dependents.
nice. I was actually the videographer "hired" (well, di ako binayaran actually) to video the current state of the Clark Veterans Cemetery.

good thing something came out of it :) GGLC was also delayed because Peregrine (the company doing GGLC) focused more in preserving CVC.

here are snapshots from the videos I took last year:























 

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^^relax lang sisigman, tagay ka muna. iba naman ang source nito para malaman ng mga cabalen kung saan din ang ibang publishing company yan na published :)
wrong logic. it is required to cite the source, pero it doesnt mean we post SAME content of different sources. e kung ilagay ko dito limang pare-parehong press releases. isa galing sunstar, isa galing MB, isa galing yahoo news, isa galing GMA News, isa galing Punto... base sa argument mo e, ok lang yun. kapag pareho ng word per word ang pareho ng article, iisa lang ang news source (kadalasan press release), and it doesnt matter kung sino-sino ang magpublish nito.

mas okay pa ring advice ang: magbasa muna ng past posts para di dumodoble ang mga pinopost. at i-quote yung dating post na yun in case you want to add a new remark. why would you post it again without additional information di ba? it just means you neglected the past post. mas logical at mas may respeto, di ba?

di lang kasi first time na ginagawa mo ito e.

ikaw rin, sige.
 

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Arayat Park Groomed For Tourism

ARAYAT, Pampanga — Governor Lilia Pineda revealed yesterday that Mt. Arayat Park here will be groomed as the next big tourist spot in Pampanga after shedding off its image as a “cradle of rebels in Central Luzon.”

“Considering the potential and strategic position of the mountain, which is located at the central plain of Central Luzon as well as the current development in the peace and order efforts of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and the Philippine National Police (PNP), Mt. Arayat can emerge as one of the best tourist spots in the Region 3,” said Pineda.

Pineda is now looking for new investors who will develop the Arayat National Park to bring back its old glory as the prime tourists spot in the province.

“We want to develop the full potentials and bring back the glorious days of Mt. Arayat National Park,” she said.

Earlier, the provincial government allotted 70 hectares of the Mt. Arayat National Park for its agro-tourism project in line with President Aquino’s pro-environment activities.

With this, the leadership of the 703rd Infantry Brigade of the Philippine Army through its Commander Col. Gregorio Catapang assured the investors of continuing effort to promote Arayat a crime free town.

“This is now the right time to buy lots and invest here in Arayat. We would assure you (referring to investors) that your investments would not go to waste,” Catapang said.

Earlier, the army commander declared Pampanga, including Arayat as insurgency free.

Amador Pineda, executive secretary of Mayor Luis Espino, said the recent development in the town’s peace and order is vital in getting the trust and confidence of business owners.

He said the business in the town is getting boom with the construction of some business establishments.

Aside from PureGold, other business establishments who are also willing to invest here are Jollibee and Metrobank.

Article source: http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/356015/arayat-park-groomed-for-tourism

Yan ang dahilan kung bakit dapat pagandahin uli ang Arayat Park at bantayan para di na ito ma-vadalized ng mga pasaway na tosser.
 

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Porac Pampanga Visita Iglesia



We left the house around 845am. We arrived at Balintawak Toll at 919am, paid 45 toll fee. Arrived 950am at San Fernando exit, paid 112.




We arrived at Brgy Pio in Porac at 1030. There is only one road going to Barangay Pio and the Chapel can be easily seen from afar. The Chapel was closed when we arrived so there was nothing to except take pictures of the Church and surrounding Buildings. At the Back of the Church is a Cemetery and on the right is an Old House.

We Left Barangay Pio at 1036am then proceeded to Porac Town. Arrived 1043am. The Church was open so i was able to take pictures of the Inside, we left Porac at 1052am.


Arrived Hacienda Dolores at 11am. There is only one main road in Hacienda Dolores and the church is along the main road so it is hard to miss it. The Church was closed also like the one in Pio, and even the gate was closed too. But i was able to get pics of the church. We Left 1110am. Proceeded to Angeles City for Lunch.

Arrived at Everybody’s 1130am. We ordered Kare Kareng Baka, Morcon, Inihaw na Hito. Our total Bill totaled P1300 (hmmmm it would have been cheaper if we ate at Balay Kapampangan). We finished lunch at 12. We then went to susie’s to buy Tibuk Tibuk.


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Ayala expands socialized housing

Bella Vita, the socialized housing brand of property group Ayala Land, Inc., is steadily expanding its reach in various areas of the Philippines five months after it was officially launched in November last year.

The brand, which caters to the D segment of the residential market is set to unveil its second community development by the second half of the year in Alaminos, Pangasinan, according to Lyle Abadia, president of Bella Vita developer South Maya, Inc. The third development would be located in Batangas,

The brand, whose housing units would cost not more than P650,000, is also looking at more locations untapped by most commercial developers in the country, said Abadia.

“We are always on the lookout for new areas, continuously talking for new lands to acquire but so far there are no definite agreements yet except for the two,” said Abadia.

By venturing into the socialized housing segment of the residential market, Ayala Land has completely covered all the various sub-markets of the residential market starting with its core brands of Ayala Land Premier which caters to the high-end market with a price range of P6.5 million to P35 million; Alveo Land for units costing between P3.5 million and P10 million; and Avida Land, P1.2 million to P4.5 million.

Bella Vita was unveiled last year together with the fifth brand Amaia which sells units at a range of P600,000 to P1.25 million.

The lowest price at Bella Vita is P400,000.

Bella Vita unveiled its maiden project in Gen. Trias, Cavite, a 21-hectare community of 1,378 housing units and a one-hectare mini-retail area to be called Fiesta Market. Units are between 21 square meters to 56 square meters.

Bella Vita Cavite’s three-phase development is now on the second phase. Abadia said the first phase which has 602 units is 50 percent sold. Development of Fiesta Market will start soon.

Fiesta Market will be an open-air retail area whose locators are residents themselves.

Bella Vita units are positioned for families that can cover a monthly amortization of P2,500 to P2,800 which are mostly minimum-wage earners.

Antonino Aquino, Ayala Land president, earlier expressed how Bella Vita together with sister-company Amaia will position the group in the end-user segment of the residential market. Based on government estimates, housing backlog in the Philippines will reach 7.55 million by 2016 with most of it in the lower-end of the income bracket.

Jaime Ysmael earlier said segments where Amaia and Bella Vita are active in contribute about 17 percent in terms of value but they will comprise about half of the group’s housing developments in the future.

In both Alaminos, Pangasinan, and Batangas, Abadia said Bella Vita will develop a community of around 15 hectares.

Abadia said Bella Vita is also eyeing the development of communities in Quezon, Nueva Ecija, and Pampanga, though no particular areas have been selected yet.

Aquino at Ayala Land’s recent briefing said the company eyes to have sub-urban community development in various areas in the Philippines, apart from its in-city projects. Market observers aver that these sub-urban developments could be the location for Bella Vita projects.

Source

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So mala xevera pala ito....swerte ng mapipiling lugar since sigurado beside nyan, e dun din itatayo yung Fiesta Market na ibinalitang itatayo din sa Pampanga
 

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I find it freakish to see incessant friction in this thread lately. Ceasefire muna, puede?
 

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From this google map you presented, if you try to dissect Clark into Angeles & Mabalacat sections based on the red line, it seems like SM Clark Annex (in the blue box) would still be mostly within Angeles zone and just "maybe" partially Mabalacat.
 

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so for example, when SM Clark was being built (which is inside Angeles territory), it still needed negotiation with Angeles government. hindi mo maaasahan ang resibo ng mga estblishments sa loob ng Clark. Ang makikita mo lang ay "Clark Freeport Zone, Pampanga".
Some receipts would show "Clark Freeport, Angeles, Pampanga," "Clark Freeport, Pampanga," and "Clark Freeport, Brgy Malabanias, Angeles City." Pretty much discrepant receipts from every store I guess. But one thing's for sure, hindi sakop ni Boking yan!
 

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From this google map you presented, if you try to dissect Clark into Angeles & Mabalacat sections based on the red line, it seems like SM Clark Annex (in the blue box) would still be mostly within Angeles zone and just "maybe" partially Mabalacat.
But the thing is, hindi yun ang boundary ng Angeles-Mabalacat which starts from the Arc, google map is kinda meh at this
 

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But the thing is, hindi yun ang boundary ng Angeles-Mabalacat which starts from the Arc, google map is kinda meh at this
But regardless of the arch, it's not even a mile away from where the creek is. It won't, in any way, affect "much" the Angeles-Mabt boundary. This is my thought that doesn't mean to contend with yours. :)
 

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But regardless of the arch, it's not even a mile away from where the creek is. It won't, in any way, affect "much" the Angeles-Mabt boundary. This is my thought that doesn't mean to contend with yours. :)
Actually, it greatly does :)

using the same map



The Arc is very near the Shell Station (Yellow arrow)...

In fairness sa google map, Updated sa GGLC road works huh
 

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^^ Sometime two years ago I traveled to the edge of Mabalacat just to see this bridge up close. I was disappointed. The pictures were deceiving. If you go there, the bridge isn't as imposing as shown in pictures of it. And I'm saying this objectively, not because I hate Mabalacat and its mayor.
 

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@mnemonick where is sm clark annex located?
sa likod ba sa alfresco area with fountain? maluwag din kasi un leftside going to clark..
 

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^^ Sometime two years ago I traveled to the edge of Mabalacat just to see this bridge up close. I was disappointed. The pictures were deceiving. If you go there, the bridge isn't as imposing as shown in pictures of it. And I'm saying this objectively, not because I hate Mabalacat and its mayor.
Ganun ba? Ill try to take a recent pic within this week, last time na nakita ko kasi to, meron ng Welcome Sign, Vandalisms at Campaign Posters :bash::bash::bash:

@mnemonick where is sm clark annex located?
sa likod ba sa alfresco area with fountain? maluwag din kasi un leftside going to clark..

Based sa ongoing construction pictures na napost ni Mr. Sisigman last time, sa likod yung annex in front of the Alfresco Area....yung left side ata gagawing bus terminal or something, not sure tho kasi pa ko nakakakita ng plan ng expansion
 

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Ayala expands socialized housing

Bella Vita, the socialized housing brand of property group Ayala Land, Inc., is steadily expanding its reach in various areas of the Philippines five months after it was officially launched in November last year.

The brand, which caters to the D segment of the residential market is set to unveil its second community development by the second half of the year in Alaminos, Pangasinan, according to Lyle Abadia, president of Bella Vita developer South Maya, Inc. The third development would be located in Batangas,

The brand, whose housing units would cost not more than P650,000, is also looking at more locations untapped by most commercial developers in the country, said Abadia.

“We are always on the lookout for new areas, continuously talking for new lands to acquire but so far there are no definite agreements yet except for the two,” said Abadia.

By venturing into the socialized housing segment of the residential market, Ayala Land has completely covered all the various sub-markets of the residential market starting with its core brands of Ayala Land Premier which caters to the high-end market with a price range of P6.5 million to P35 million; Alveo Land for units costing between P3.5 million and P10 million; and Avida Land, P1.2 million to P4.5 million.

Bella Vita was unveiled last year together with the fifth brand Amaia which sells units at a range of P600,000 to P1.25 million.

The lowest price at Bella Vita is P400,000.

Bella Vita unveiled its maiden project in Gen. Trias, Cavite, a 21-hectare community of 1,378 housing units and a one-hectare mini-retail area to be called Fiesta Market. Units are between 21 square meters to 56 square meters.

Bella Vita Cavite’s three-phase development is now on the second phase. Abadia said the first phase which has 602 units is 50 percent sold. Development of Fiesta Market will start soon.

Fiesta Market will be an open-air retail area whose locators are residents themselves.

Bella Vita units are positioned for families that can cover a monthly amortization of P2,500 to P2,800 which are mostly minimum-wage earners.

Antonino Aquino, Ayala Land president, earlier expressed how Bella Vita together with sister-company Amaia will position the group in the end-user segment of the residential market. Based on government estimates, housing backlog in the Philippines will reach 7.55 million by 2016 with most of it in the lower-end of the income bracket.

Jaime Ysmael earlier said segments where Amaia and Bella Vita are active in contribute about 17 percent in terms of value but they will comprise about half of the group’s housing developments in the future.

In both Alaminos, Pangasinan, and Batangas, Abadia said Bella Vita will develop a community of around 15 hectares.

Abadia said Bella Vita is also eyeing the development of communities in Quezon, Nueva Ecija, and Pampanga, though no particular areas have been selected yet.

Aquino at Ayala Land’s recent briefing said the company eyes to have sub-urban community development in various areas in the Philippines, apart from its in-city projects. Market observers aver that these sub-urban developments could be the location for Bella Vita projects.

Source

*****************

So mala xevera pala ito....swerte ng mapipiling lugar since sigurado beside nyan, e dun din itatayo yung Fiesta Market na ibinalitang itatayo din sa Pampanga
Wow 400K lng isang unit kukuha ako nito kung ang location nito ay SF/ANGELES.. pag iipunan ko to babayaran ko cash..
pwd pa idaan monthly amortization 2,500 a month..
bakit ang mura naman considering na ayala ang developer..
 
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