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Ukrainian Chicago

While checking out the "Ukrainian Ex- Pat/Foreign Construction" thread earlier, I realized i still haven't posted the photos from my visit to Chicago in August of last year. I used that opportunity to visit the area called "Ukrainian Village"...please excuse the quality of some of these photos:)






































































 

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Pretty nice idea to make such thread about Ukrainian Village in Chicago, it's always interesting to see the life of immigrants away from their country, I guess it would be nice to see that thread sometimes updated, now I think may be to make the same one in Russian forum about the Russian district Richmond in San Francisco :lol:
 

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Interesting pictures. The Churches are very interesting, they look Ukrainian Orthodox but are Catholic. I liked this the most:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v127/Pupin11/UkrajinskiCikago/IMG_3885Large.jpg

Also I'm glad to see Ukrainians in Chicago being both proud of their heritage and respecting their new country with both flags always together. Unlike many other immigrants in America who live in U.S. and hate it from within.
 

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Interesting pictures. The Churches are very interesting, they look Ukrainian Orthodox but are Catholic. I liked this the most:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v127/Pupin11/UkrajinskiCikago/IMG_3885Large.jpg

Yes, but remember: the Ukrainian Catholic Church is a Church that follows the "Kyvian tradition", meaning that for the most part, it has much more similarities with Ukrainian Orthodoxism, then, for instance, Roman Catholicism. The traditions are the exact same as Orthodox, the sign of the cross same way, etc etc: In fact, the only thing that makes them different from Orthodox people is the fact that they recognize the Pope.
 

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So it's more of just a Ukrainian Church rather than being Catholic or Orthodox.
 

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You can say that, which brings me to my next point: these two churches need to unite. But there's just one main issue, I'm sure you know as well as I do what it is, and that issue will take a long time to solve. It can be done, though. They're already talking about uniting..
 

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I think most modern Ukrainians don't care much about being associated with Orthodox or Catholic religious institutions, there should definitely be Church of Ukraine without any association with anything else for all I care.
 

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Does Chicago have the biggest Ukrainian population in the U.S. or would NYC? I also wonder when Chicago is going to get airline service east of Warsaw in Europe. I am a bit surprised that there is no direct service to Ukraine considering the number of in Chicagoland. Hopefully AA, UA, or Aerosvit will get make the connection sometime soon.
 

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I think most modern Ukrainians don't care much about being associated with Orthodox or Catholic religious institutions, there should definitely be Church of Ukraine without any association with anything else for all I care.
Yea, exactly. Plus there's no major rivalry between the Churches, especially between Ukrainian Catholic and Ukrainian Orthodox KP, and especially among young people. For example, me, my dads side is Ukrainian Orthodox, my moms side is Ukrainian Catholic, so I especially want this. The only issue is communion with the Pope.
 

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I'm all Orthodox on both sides, but don't really feel any different towards Catholic Ukrainians. Ukrainian Jews are a bit different though.
 

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I'm all Orthodox on both sides, but don't really feel any different towards Catholic Ukrainians. Ukrainian Jews are a bit different though.
Yea, cos they all celebrate the same holidays and everything.... Thats why its stupid to have two different religions, they're the same without one thing. Its probably better to call them "uniate Catholic Ukrainians" though, since Catholic might imply they're Roman Catholic, which would be a totally different story. I agree about Jews, but thats cos' they have totally different holidays, traditions etc....
 

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I like both churches, they are different styles but both very nice. That neighbourhood is a nice 'Little Ukraine'.
 

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In Edmonton there is no village as pretty much the whole city became Ukrainian, Polish and Hungarian at the same time that they built the city instead of taking over a small section. Ukrainian and Polish churches litter throughout the whole city but are generally concentrated around the north end of the city.
 

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Searching in the web there is a lot of information about ukrainians in Canada, it seems that it is an important community, specially in central Canada
 

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Generally if you trace a line across Canada from Winnipeg to Edmonton, along that line is where you will find most of the Ukrainians on the prairies; Yorkton (Saskatchewan) and that area especially though, as around half of the population in that surrounding area is Ukrainian. There are some Poles in that area too... My mom grew up there, and all she can remember are fellow Ukrainians and some Polish people.
 

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This story appeared in the Travel section of yesterday's edition of free daily "Metro" newspaper in my city (Toronto) :

Published July 4, 2007

Slavic flavour dots east-central Alberta



A blacksmith demonstrates what life was like just over a 100 years ago when the eastern Slavs moved to Canada at the Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village in Mundare, Alta.






A costumed interpreter at the Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village in Mundare, Alta.


Drive east of Edmonton through the scenic countryside and you might think for a moment that you’ve landed in Ukraine.


Onion-shaped church domes dot the landscape, a reminder of the area’s heritage.


This is Kalyna country — a 20,000-square-kilometre area in east-central Alberta stretching to the Saskat*chewan border — and everywhere, it seems, there’s the legacy of the Slavic migration to the West that began just over 100 years ago.


The Ukrainians, Galicians, Ruthenians and Bukovinians left a physical impact in the form of over 50 exquisite Byzantine churches in what has been called the Church Capital of Canada.


As Arnold Grandt, head of the Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village, states: “They came here for a number of reasons, including that there were a number of similarities to their homeland in Galicia and Bukovina, with similar vegetation and temperature.”


To gain an understanding of the Slavic impact on Western Canada, visitors can make their way to the heritage village, about 60 kilometres east of Edmonton.


The interpretive centre explains the exodus from the eastern Slavic lands (today’s Ukraine and Poland) to Alberta. Interpreters on site, wearing period costumes, answer questions about the lumber yard, school or church they are stationed at. Authentic Slavic food such as perogies, holubtsi (cabbage rolls) and kubasa sausage is served in the restaurant.


Visiting the three churches at the heritage village is a must. The village’s St. Vladimir’s Ukrainian Greek Orthodox Church is a beauty, including interior paintings by Vadym Dobrolige, a well-known painter of religious art in Alberta. The church is still used by the community.


In the 50-odd churches mentioned in Kalyna by Alberta Tourism, there is a near equal split between Russo-Greek Catholic, Russian Orthodox, Ukrainian Catholic and Ukrainian Orthodox.


“Eastern Slavs were responsible for homesteading a large part of Alberta’s parkland belt and successfully transforming what had been wilderness into productive farmland,” says Jaroslav Balan, historian and the executive director of the Kalyna Country Ecomuseum Trust Society, which promotes tourism in the area.


“As such, they contributed greatly to the early economic development and eventual prosperity of Alberta.”


The region is named after the kalyna berries, or cranberries, that were a source of food for the early pioneers.


In the immediate area of the heritage village, at Mundare, there are two unique attractions: the Basilian Fathers Museum explains the contribution of the Ukrainian monks and priests in the area. And at Stawnichy’s Meat Processing you can tour the plant that produces the well-loved kubasa sausage. For more visit www.kalynacountry.comor tapor.ualberta.ca/heritagevillage.

Canadian Press

So, after Chicago, this could be my next destination:yes:
Along with that earlier-mentioned Russian district of San Fran.
 

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The Ukrainians, Galicians, Ruthenians and Bukovinians left a physical impact in the form of over 50 exquisite Byzantine churches in what has been called the Church Capital of Canada.

Hehe, maybe, "The Canadians, Onatarioins, Saskatchewanins, and Manitobins" will like to find out more about this whole thing :).
 

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Yeah that was hilarious ^^ but probably an innocent mistake :)
 
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