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Gotham City
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sanders Makes His Last Stand

By Philipe Schoene Roura on May 26, 2016

SAN JUAN–The closer the Democratic Party inches to the finish line in this presidential primary campaign, the more difficult the securing the nomination seems to become. Nearly two months ago, most observers were looking at the Puerto Rico contest with 67 delegates at stake as a mere afterthought because Hillary Clinton had a seemingly insurmountable lead in May.


Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Bernie Sanders evenly split the 14 delegates at stake in Wyoming with Clinton, and now it looks like Sanders could take the Puerto Rico primary to be held on June 5. “We thought Hillary’s team would be a formidable foe, given their enormous victory over Barack Obama during the 2008 primary,” said one source tied to the Democratic Party in Puerto Rico. “Now, we’re seeing that the [Vermont] senator has nearly twice as many volunteers to work the polling stations than the former [U.S.] Secretary of State.”
Clinton, who took 38 of Puerto Rico’s 55 delegates in 2008 because she obtained 66% of the vote, will need foot soldiers manning the polls because certain Democratic safeguards are not being met “In the Democratic primaries, they aren’t going to use voting booths, they aren’t going to ink their fingers and will not use electronic vote count,” said Liza García Vélez, president of the State Elections Commission. She said that in the case of the electronic vote count, Democratic Party functionaries waited too long to make the arrangements and there was not enough time to have the system programmed.
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Role reversal: GOP unites behind Trump, Democrats in disarray

Updated 9:50 PM ET, Thu May 26, 2016

Story highlights


  • Julian Zelizer: A month ago, it looked like the GOP was headed for convention chaos
  • Now Democrats are enmeshed in a battle of principles that Bernie Sanders warns may be "messy"
  • Donald Trump clinches nomination; Hillary Clinton's path to uniting party isn't clear, Zelizer says
(CNN)Just when it seemed that the election could not get any crazier, it has.

A month ago, it seemed that the Democrats were sitting pretty. Republicans were in disarray. All the talk revolved around a contested convention in Cleveland as Sen. Ted Cruz kept winning delegates in state conventions who would vote for him on the second round. The #Never Trump Movement was gaining steam as prominent members of the GOP announced that they would not be able to support the New York billionaire's candidacy.
In contrast, the Democrats had themselves an apparently solid nominee. After a series of strong wins, including in New York and Pennsylvania, it looked like Hillary Clinton would finally bring her competition with Bernie Sanders to an end. Clinton, it appeared, was poised to run a campaign that could replicate the events of 1964 when Lyndon Johnson trounced Barry Goldwater in a landslide victory that produced huge liberal majorities in the House and Senate.

Yet only a few weeks later, the story looks very different. Now it is the Democrats who are struggling through some fierce internecine divisions. Sanders' attacks have intensified in recent weeks. He has raised the volume of his comments about Clinton and charged that the entire nomination process has been problematic and unfair. His supporters have flooded the airwaves to complain about the superdelegates, while Sanders announced he would support Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz's primary opponent given her alleged favoritism toward Clinton. Sanders warned that the convention could be "messy," adding, "Democracy is not always nice and gentle."
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In Pursuit of GOP Unity, Ryan Endorses Trump

By Caribbean Business news services on June 2, 2016


House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks during an interview with The Associated Press Thursday, June 2, 2016, in Janesville, Wis. (AP Photo/Andy Manis)

JANESVILLE, Wis. – House Speaker Paul Ryan endorsed Donald Trump’s bid for president on Thursday, bringing an end to the extraordinary public split between the GOP’s presumptive White House nominee and the nation’s top Republican in office.
“I had friends wishing I wouldn’t support him. I had friends wishing I would,” Ryan said in an exclusive interview with The Associated Press. “I really didn’t feel any pressure, other than my goal is to make sure that were unified so that we’re at full strength in the fall so we can win the election.”
The Wisconsin Republican’s announcement, made in a newspaper column published in his Wisconsin hometown, marks a significant step for a Republican Party trying to come together ahead of a general election matchup against likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.
And Ryan made clear he had Clinton on his mind when he decided to join the ranks of Republicans who have slowly come around to backing Trump, the brash billionaire few expected to emerge as the party’s nominee when the campaign began in earnest last year.
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What a shock!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sanders acusa a Clinton de copiar su opinión y ser poco clara con Puerto Rico

El Expresso de Puerto Rico 30 mayo, 2016

(EFE) – El senador y precandidato presidencial demócrata Bernie Sanders dijo hoy que “las opiniones constantemente cambiantes” de su contrincante Hillary Clinton sobre los problemas que enfrenta Puerto Rico son “demasiado poco” y las ofrece “demasiado tarde”.
“Así como ha ocurrido en muchas otras ocasiones anteriores, la secretaria Clinton ha cambiado de opinión y está acercándose cada vez más a las opiniones que yo he expresado”, afirmó Sanders en un comunicado a seis días de que se celebren las primarias demócratas en Puerto Rico.
La campaña del aspirante a candidato a la Casa Blanca por el Partido Demócrata apuntó en ese sentido que la ex secretaria de Estado de EE.UU. inicialmente se mostró a favor de la medida legislativa preparada por el Congreso federal para imponer una junta de control fiscal sobre el Gobierno de Puerto Rico designada por Washington.


Hillary Clinton


“Después de que Sanders se pronunciara en contra del proyecto de ley, Clinton ahora ha expresado que tiene reservas poco claras acerca de la medida”, dijo la campaña del precandidato en un comunicado.
Igualmente, puso de relieve que Sanders fue el primer candidato presidencial en exigir la excarcelación de Oscar López Rivera, “un preso político de 73 años de edad que está enfermo”, mientras que “ahora, una semana antes de la primaria presidencial de Puerto Rico, ella dice que ‘evaluaría el caso’”.
“Me agrada saber que quiere revisar el caso de Oscar López Rivera, pero el tiempo para la revisión ha terminado. Oscar López Rivera debe ser liberado”, defendió Sanders.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Clinton is close, but Sanders not ready to give up

By Maeve Reston, CNN

Los Angeles (CNN)Hillary Clinton is on the cusp of declaring victory as the Democratic nominee after a long and protracted battle with Bernie Sanders. But she has one very serious problem: The Vermont senator isn't giving up.

Clinton and her husband have barnstormed across California at a furious pace in recent days -- seeking to avoid yet another humiliating defeat by Sanders on the same night she should easily win the delegates needed to go past the 2,383 mark and clinch the nomination.
"I'm very proud of the campaign we're running here, and I believe, on Tuesday, I will have decisively won the popular vote and I will have decisively won the pledged delegate majority," Clinton said on CNN's "State of the Union."

By all objective measures, she and her allies argue that the race is over. The delegate math, the money, the millions of votes in her column -- all point to her inevitability as the nominee.
Sanders, however, shows no sign that he is preparing to exit the stage.
Facing a strong possibility that he could carry in California, he vowed, in no uncertain terms this weekend, to lead his "movement" on to the convention in Philadelphia.
At a news conference in L.A.'s Little Tokyo Saturday, he railed against the press and the news networks for counting superdelegates in their tallies.
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Elizabeth Warren declares herself ready to be Hillary Clinton's running mate

Massachusetts senator endorses presumptive Democratic nominee and puts herself in the frame as possible vice-presidential candidate

Senator Elizabeth Warren has declared herself ready to be Hillary Clinton’s running mate in the US presidential election.
The Massachusetts senator – popular among the progressive wing of the Democratic party – made the declaration shortly after endorsing Clinton, calling her “a fighter with guts” who would keep Donald Trump out the White House.
In an interview on MSNBC, Warren was asked by Rachel Maddow: “If you were asked to be Secretary Clinton’s running mate, do you believe you could do it?”

Her response was concise: “Yes, I do.”
In another interview with the Boston Globe on Thursday, Warren endorsed Clinton as the party’s presidential nominee, saying: “I’m ready to jump in this fight and make sure that Hillary Clinton is the next president of the United States and be sure that Donald Trump gets nowhere near the White House.”
According to the Globe she also praised Clinton’s primary opponent, Bernie Sanders, saying that he had run an “incredible campaign”.

Speaking to MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow on Thursday evening, Warren said the Sanders campaign had been “powerfully important”.
“He ran a campaign from the heart, and he ran a campaign where he took these issues and really thrust them into the spotlight – issues that are near and dear to my heart – and he brought millions of people into the democratic process,” she said.

But, Warren said, “Hillary Clinton won. And she won because she’s a fighter, she’s out there, she’s tough. And I think this is what we need.”
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The Road to the White House Runs Past Disney World

Uncle Walt’s theme park transformed central Florida and helped create one of the biggest electoral prizes in America.

By CRAIG PITTMAN September 06, 2016

When Hillary Clinton delivered a national security speech Tuesday at the University of South Florida in Tampa, it was the fifth time that she has visited the city this year. Her rival is no less frequent a visitor. Tampa sits at the western end of the Interstate-4 corridor and Clinton and Donald Trump both know that the 132-mile, traffic-slammed slab of asphalt that stretches across the center of the Florida peninsula is in many ways the road to the White House.

Trump and Clinton have popped up along the I-4 corridor so much, in fact, they virtually qualify for a Florida resident discount at the theme parks.

Clinton met with survivors of the Pulse nightclub massacre in Orlando and picked a rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa to deliver a fiery response to Trump's convention acceptance speech. On top of big rallies Trump held in Tampa in June, July and August, the real estate mogul met with pastors in Orlando and held a rally in Kissimmee in August. His chief Florida strategist, Karen Giorno, told an interviewer that the I-4 corridor is “what we call the big enchilada. You have to win it.”

The highway—stretching from the sprawling suburbs of Tampa, through the fantasylands around Orlando to NASCAR fans’ nirvana in Daytona Beach—rounds up more than 40 percent of Florida’s registered voters. Its residents cover the political spectrum from die-hard right-wingers to hard-core left-wingers to swing voters who switch their allegiance with each election. The advertising dollars spent here by the campaigns tell just how precious this slice of the electorate is: the Orlando-Daytona Beach-Melbourne TV market ranked number one in the entire nation in ad spending for the presidential race in August, with $8.1 million, according to NBC News. Second place went to the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Sarasota market, with $7.6 million.

“It’s a microcosm of Florida, and of America,” explained historian Gary Mormino, author of the book Land of Sunshine, State of Dreams.

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Plopping down so many tourist attractions along one highway drew lots of hotels and motels to provide Mom and Pop and the sugared-up kids with a place to crash—all the Sheratons, Marriotts and Holiday Inns, not to mention the quirky ones that Disney itself offers with ginormous swans and dolphins on top. Those hotels and motels attracted thousands of Puerto Ricans to Central Florida seeking better paying jobs in a state that has no income tax. Some came from colder climes up North, but plenty more came straight from the island.

Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, and its residents have been free to travel to and from the mainland without dealing with the immigration authorities since 1917. But the South's history of racial discrimination discouraged many Puerto Rican families from settling in Florida. The few who did find their way to Florida worked as cutters in the sugar cane fields, a hard way to make a dollar.

Once Walt's kingdom arose from the swamps, though, they poured in by the thousands, and found a warm welcome in the Sunshine State. Florida’s Puerto Rican population grew from slightly more than 2 percent of all stateside Puerto Ricans in 1960 to more than 14 percent by the year 2000, according to a study by Jorge Duany of the University of Puerto Rico and Félix V. Matos-Rodríguez of Hunter College.

One savvy Florida developer, Landstar Homes, put on an aggressive marketing campaign on the island that enticed families to leave the island and move to its Buenaventura Lakes subdivision in Central Florida’s Osceola County. They targeted Puerto Ricans in New York and Chicago, too. Soon other developers followed suit. Now about 271,000 Puerto Ricans live in Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties, according to the Sentinel.

The ones coming from the island had no family tradition of voting Republican or Democrat, Healey explained. Those parties don't exist in Puerto Rico, because voters in the territory are not allowed to cast ballots for president in the November elections. So when they arrived in Florida, they were, politically speaking, “a clean slate,” she said.

At first neither political party recognized what this bonanza of new voters might mean, said David Colburn, a University of Florida history professor and the author of From Yellow Dog Democrats to Red State Republicans. Once they did, though, they began signing up new voters as quickly as they could, and candidates began paying the area more and more visits, he said.

Their impact began being felt in 2004, when former Orange County chairman Mel Martinez beat better known Anglo politicians to become the state's first-ever Hispanic U.S. Senator, Mormino said. Although Martinez himself is Cuban, “the Puerto Ricans won that one for him.”

Since then, though, their votes have swung back and forth between the parties, making their support unpredictable.

“They are the true swing voters,” Healey said.

In recent years the Puerto Rican exodus from the island has swollen from a trickle to a flood as people flee a rocky economy, a government in crisis and the spread of the Zika virus. As they arrived in Florida, they were frequently met by Clinton campaigners helping them register to vote.

Some of the Puerto Rican boom, Colburn said, has been balanced out by the influx of white seniors, particularly at The Villages, the fastest-growing metro area in America and the largest gated over-55 community in the world. Built on a site that once held pastures, orange groves and a mobile home park northwest of Orlando, it's now occupied by more than 100,000 residents in an area bigger than Manhattan, In 2005, they set a Guinness record for the world's longest golf cart parade. The Villagers are reliably Republican and likely to vote for Trump, even though his campaign canceled his only scheduled appearance there in May a mere seven minutes before it was supposed to start. True to Villages style, his supporters held a golf cart parade for him in March. One cart featured a blond combover on top.

The corridor's unpredictability is what makes it so vital to the election, and guarantees that the candidates will continue to pop up all over I-4 over the next two months.

“Of the state's 67 counties, it's possible to say today how 60 of them will vote,” explained Clark, the University of Central Florida historian. The four southeast counties—Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach and Monroe—always go to the Democrats. So do Alachua County, where the University of Florida is located, and the counties around the state capital of Tallahassee, home of Florida State University and Florida A&M, he explained. The rest of the state usually votes Republican.

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It's gonna be too easy for her. If Republicans would've chosen Bush, Kasich or Rubio they probably would've won, not saying they're better than her just saying how the electorate would've reacted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
FACT CHECK: Trump, Clinton Deny their own Words in Debate

By The Associated Press on September 27, 2016

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump walk their separate ways after the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

WASHINGTON – Donald Trump’s habit of peddling hype and fabrication emerged unabated in the first presidential debate while Hillary Clinton played it cautiously in her statements, though not without error. They both denied making statements that they are on the record as saying.
A look at some of the claims in the debate and how they compare with the facts:
TRUMP, denying Clinton’s accusation that he supported the Iraq war: “Wrong. Wrong.” Later: “That is a mainstream media nonsense put out by her. I was against the war in Iraq.”
THE FACTS: There is no evidence Trump expressed public opposition to the war before the U.S. invaded, despite his repeated insistence that he did. Rather, he offered lukewarm support. He only began to voice doubts about the conflict well after it began in March 2003.
His first known public comment on the topic came on Sept. 11, 2002, when he was asked whether he supported a potential Iraq invasion in an interview with radio host Howard Stern. “Yeah, I guess so,” Trump responded.
On March 21, 2003, just days after the invasion began, Trump said it “looks like a tremendous success from a military standpoint.”
Later that year he began voicing doubts.

CLINTON, denying Trump’s accusation that she called the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal the “gold standard” of trade agreements: “I did say I hoped it would be a good deal.”
THE FACTS: Trump is correct. On a 2012 trip to Australia as secretary of state, Clinton called the deal that was taking shape the “gold standard” of trade agreements. She championed it in other venues around the world. She did not merely express the hope it would turn out well.
Clinton flip-flopped into opposing the trade deal in the Democratic primary when facing Bernie Sanders, who was strongly opposed to it.
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Inmensa mayoría de los boricuas de Florida votarán por Hillary Clinton
Mientras, el 56% quiere que Puerto Rico sea el estado 51 de Estados Unidos



WASHINGTON - El 74% de los boricuas de Florida está inclinado a votar por la demócrata Hillary Clinton, de cara a las presidenciales de noviembre, según una nueva encuesta.

Solo un 17% dice que consideraría votar por el republicano Donald Trump.

La encuesta – ordenada por el Center for American Progress Action Fund y hecha por Latino Decisions -, indica además que una mayoría de los electores boricuas de ese estado quieren que Puerto Rico sea el estado 51 de Estados Unidos.

El 74% que votaría por Clinton se divide entre el 61% que está convencido de votar por la exsecretaria de Estado, un 8% que no está totalmente seguro y un 5% que está “inclinado” hacia la también exsenadora.

En el caso de Trump, solo un 12% está seguro de votar por él. Mientras, un 2% lo favorece sin darlo como un hecho y otro 3% está meramente inclinado a respaldarlo.

En 2012, un 83% de los puertorriqueños votó a favor de la reelección del presidente Barack Obama, según un estudio realizado a la salida de las urnas por la firma encuestadora demócrata Bendixen & Amandi.

De acuerdo a la encuesta de Latino Decisions, dada a conocer hoy, el 82% de los electores respalda candidatos que apoyen asistencia para Puerto Rico. Un 76% da su voto a los que quieren expandir el programa federal Medicaid y un 74% a los que favorecen aumentar el salario mínimo federal.

Mientras, el 77% respalda candidatos que estén a favor de ofrecerle a los indocumentados un proceso para normalizar sus vidas y obtener la ciudadanía estadounidense.

El 46% de los entrevistados dice que sigue las noticias sobre Puerto Rico diariamente.

Al enumerar sus temas prioritarios, los entrevistados destacaron temas de economía y trabajo (33%); salud (19%); inmigración/deportaciones (13%); educación (12%); la crisis financiera de Puerto Rico (11%); y asuntos sobre la discriminación contra los latinos (10%).

En términos de status, el 56% dijo favorecer la estadidad para Puerto Rico, un 25% la continuación del llamado “Estado Libre Asociado” y un 8% la independencia.

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http://www.elnuevodia.com/noticias/...uasdefloridavotaranporhillaryclinton-2248236/
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Florida's Puerto Ricans strongly favor Clinton: poll

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledges the crowd at a campaign rally in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder


By Luciana Lopez | NEW YORK
Florida's rapidly growing Puerto Rican population heavily favors Democrat Hillary Clinton over Republican Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential race, according to a poll released on Wednesday by groups with links to the Democrats.
Seventy-four percent of Puerto Ricans now registered to vote in Florida said they would likely pick Clinton in the Nov. 8 election, versus 17 percent for Trump, according to the poll from the Center for American Progress Action Fund and Latino Decisions.
Puerto Ricans, who traditionally lean toward voting Democratic in Florida, are a big enough group to swing the closely-fought state.
Florida, the third-largest state in the country in terms of electoral college votes needed to win the White House, has seen an influx of people from Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, as the Caribbean island's economy has floundered in recent years.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Donald Trump forced into apology as sex boast tape horrifies Republicans

Party and rivals condemn candidate over 2005 recording bragging about being able to grope women because of his fame

Ben Jacobs and Sabrina Siddiqui in Washington
Saturday 8 October 2016 05.41 EDT Last modified on Saturday 8 October 2016 05.53 EDT

Donald Trump has been forced to apologise after a storm of condemnation and disavowals by fellow Republicans and opponents alike over obscene boasts about using his fame to sexually prey on women.

Trump’s presidential campaign was plunged into crisis on Friday when a tape recording from 2005 emerged in which he brags to a TV host that when approaching beautiful women he can “grab them by the pussy” and kiss and grope them because he is a star.
In the conversation taking place on a bus, Trump tells Billy Bush – a cousin of George and Jeb Bush who was the then host of Access Hollywood – about his approach with women as they prepare to meet a soap opera star for a segment.
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sanders supporters seethe over Clinton's leaked remarks to Wall St.

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledges the crowd at a campaign rally in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

By Luciana Lopez and Jeff Mason | NEW YORK
Supporters of former Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders on Saturday expressed anger and vindication over leaked comments made by Hillary Clinton to banks and big business that appeared to confirm their fears about her support for global trade and tendency to cozy up to Wall Street.
Clinton, who needs Sanders' coalition of young and left-leaning voters to propel her to the presidency, pushes for open trade and open borders in one of the speeches, and takes a conciliatory approach to Wall Street, both positions she later backed away from in an effort to capture the popular appeal of Sanders' attacks on trade deals and powerful banks.
The excerpts of remarks by the former secretary of state, made in 2013 and 2014 in closed-door meetings where audiences paid to attend, were published online on Friday by WikiLeaks, which sourced them to the email account of John Podesta, Clinton's campaign chairman.
Reuters could not independently verify the authenticity of the speech transcripts. Clinton has previously declined to release any such transcripts.
"This is a very clear illustration of why there is a fundamental lack of trust from progressives for Hillary Clinton,” said Tobita Chow, chair of the People's Lobby in Chicago, which endorsed Sanders in the primary election.
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
FACT CHECK: Trump, Clinton and their debate claims

By The Associated Press on October 10, 2016


Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016.

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump mischaracterized the record on Hillary Clinton’s defense of her husband and her own treatment of women when he brought up Bill Clinton’s sexual history and other episodes of the past. Clinton didn’t give a square account of the fallout from her email practices.
A look at some of the claims in the second presidential debate:
TRUMP, asked whether the predatory behavior with women that he described in a 2005 video amounted to sexual assault: “No, I didn’t say that at all.”
THE FACTS: He certainly didn’t own up to sexual assault in his boastful remarks in 2005. But he clearly described groping and kissing women without their permission, using his celebrity to impose himself on them.
“I don’t even wait,” he bragged in the video. “And when you’re a star, they let you do it. You can do anything.” He went on: “Grab them by the p—-. You can do anything.”
He described a specific sexual advance toward a married woman. “I moved on her like a bitch. But I couldn’t get there.”
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TRUMP on Hillary Clinton’s behavior when, as a young public defender, she was assigned to represent an accused child rapist: “She’s seen on two separate occasions, laughing at the girl who was raped. Kathy Shelton, that young woman, is here with us tonight.”
THE FACTS: At no point was Clinton seen laughing at the victim.
In 1975, at the age of 12, Shelton was sexually assaulted in Northwest Arkansas. Clinton was asked by a judge overseeing the case to represent her alleged attacker. After the prosecution lost key evidence, Clinton’s client entered a plea to a lesser charge.
In an interview a decade later, Clinton expressed horror at the crime, but was recorded on tape laughing about procedural details of the case. The audio has been seized on by conservative groups looking to attack Clinton’s presidential candidacy but does not convey mirth at the girl’s fate.
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TRUMP on women linked to Bill Clinton sexually: “Hillary Clinton attacked those same women and attacked them viciously.”
THE FACTS: There is no clear, independent evidence that Hillary Clinton “viciously” attacked women who alleged or confirmed sexual contact with her husband.
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Will Puerto Ricans be the ultimate swing voters in Florida?

The growing number of Puerto Ricans in the battleground state looks like an electoral gift to Clinton – and volunteers are banking on new voter registration

In public spaces across central Florida – from schools to churches, restaurants to supermarkets, fairgrounds to DMV car licensing offices – a massive scramble is drawing to a close to register Puerto Ricans to vote in what could prove to be a tipping point in next month’s presidential election.

The cut-off for voter registrations in Florida is this week and as the deadline has approached, efforts to cajole hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans to sign up for a ballot have reached fever pitch. (On Monday, a federal judge extended the 11 October deadline by one day to allow for the disruption of the hurricane.) Volunteers mobilized by a new coalition of Hispanic groups called Que Vote Mi Gente – my people vote – have been stationed for weeks now outside favored gathering spots accosting newcomers from the island about their civic duty.
“Are you registered to vote? Are you ready to vote?” is the battle cry, and even the most superficial of glances at the statistics tells why. Florida is famously the swing state to end all swing states, ever since George Bush squeaked past Al Gore in the 2000 race for the White House with a disputed 500 votes.

Within Florida, the rapidly expanding Puerto Rican community along the I-4 corridor that runs from Orlando to Tampa has become the ultimate swing vote within the ultimate swing state in the 2016 campaign. “This is the new mecca for Puerto Ricans and it’s changing the electoral map,” said Betsy Franceschini, Florida director of the Hispanic Federation, which is participating in the voter drive.
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Trump on sex assault allegations: 'I am a victim'

Updated 9:15 PM ET, Fri October 14, 2016

(CNN)Donald Trump on Friday called himself a "victim" as more women continued to come forward on Friday accusing him of sexual assault and harassment.

"As you have seen, I am a victim of one of the great political smear campaigns in the history of our country," he said at a rally in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Friday night. "They are coming after me to try and destroy what is considered by even them the greatest movement in the history of our country."
Trump's comments came as he once again alleged it's "all false stuff" and there is a "concerted effort" to take down his campaign, ignoring calls from his campaign advisers to focus on economic issues rather than responding to the allegations.


Trump on accuser: She would not be my first choice 00:47

"My people always say, 'Don't talk about it, talk about jobs, talk about the economy,'" Trump explained to his supporters in Greensboro earlier on Friday. "But I feel I have to talk about it because you have to dispute when somebody says something."
And during his two rallies on Friday, Trump did just that, forcefully denying the allegations that he kissed and groped several women without their consent -- actions he had bragged about being able to do in a 2005 tape -- and arguing that if just a sliver of voters believe those allegations, he will lose the election.
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Trump’s path to an electoral college victory isn’t narrow. It’s nonexistent.

By Stuart Rothenberg October 18 at 6:00 AM
Trump: Election is 'rigged,' sex assault allegations 'proven false'

The trajectory of the 2016 presidential race — which will result in a Hillary Clinton victory — remains largely unchanged from May, when Donald Trump and Clinton were in the process of wrapping up their nominations.
But what has changed recently is Clinton’s likely winning margin. For many weeks, even months, I have believed that Clinton would defeat Trump by three to six points. If anything, that range now looks a bit low, with the Democratic nominee apparently headed for a more convincing victory, quite possibly in the four-to-eight-point range.
Trump continues to be his own worst enemy, saying or tweeting things that only fuel chatter about his current and past views, values and behavior. His comments about people — from Vladimir Putin and Alicia Machado to some of the women who have accused him of sexual assault — have kept the focus on him at a time when he should be making the election a referendum on Clinton.
No, Trump’s supporters have not turned on him. But he trails badly with only a few weeks to go until Nov. 8, and he must broaden his appeal to have any chance of winning. That is now impossible.
Major national polls show Clinton leading among likely voters by anywhere from as few as four points, in the Oct. 10-13 Washington Post-ABC News poll, to as many as 11 points, in the Oct. 10-13 NBC News-Wall Street Journal survey.
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Puerto Ricans Really Don’t Like Trump But Activists Want Clinton To Do More

Polls show that Puerto Ricans, a key group in the true swing state of Florida, strongly favor Hillary Clinton. But activists caution that engaging newly arriving Puerto Ricans is tough, and want the Clinton campaign to ramp up efforts in Central Florida.
posted on Oct. 18, 2016, at 8:00 p.m.https://www.buzzfeed.com/adriancarrasquillo?language=en

There are two realities in Central Florida.

Three thousand Puerto Ricans leave the island every day, already US citizens and able to register to vote in Florida, where many end up.
And most of those Puerto Ricans will vote for Hillary Clinton.
From there, however, everything gets a bit dicier. In a state where the smallest margins matter — and demographic trends now may represent significant electoral changes in the future — just how many Puerto Ricans will actually vote remains unclear. Like the young Cubans decoupling from the Republican Party and the retirees flooding into The Villages, Puerto Ricans represent one of the biggest changes to Florida’s political landscape, something that could change not just this election but the next few.
And that’s where the fighting begins, about what Puerto Ricans really want (how important is statehood?) and whether the Clinton campaign really has reached out to these voters in a robust way.
The campaign insists it has not slept on Puerto Rican outreach in Central Florida, pointing to island-style “caravanas” — loud, musical processions that are a hallmark of Puerto Rican retail politics — which it held throughout the state on Sept. 24 in South Orlando and Kissimmee targeting majority Puerto Rican neighborhoods. Processions ended with block parties at lechoneras, Puerto Rican restaurants, where campaign organizers awaited. They’ve worked with the owners of Lechonera Jibarito restaurants and Melao Bakeries to register voters during high-traffic hours. They’ve descended on Spanish-language concerts, and food and art events, along the I-4 corridor, particularly in Osceola County, where more recent arrivals, who need voter education if the campaign wants to get them to vote, reside.
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