SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 20 of 441 Posts

·
WARREN
Joined
·
8,135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Time to split this off from the global warming thread.

I was in the NSW Southern Highlands this morning and the smoke haze was apocalyptic, just like it has been for the last two weeks.

And that was even before tomorrow, when the Mittagong area is looking likely to be smashed from the north... and that's not even thinking about the Currawang fire burning from the south which is likely to hit the southern villages along the rail line if it crosses the Shoalhaven River.

Many don't realise the massive scale of these fires just because of how uninhabited most of the land surrounding the Sydney Basin is. It's monsterous.



Stay safe people, and try to enjoy your NYE :nuts:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,103 Posts
The entire stretch from Batemans Bay to Eden may become completely isolated from everywhere else by tomorrow.
Princes Hwy into Victoria closed (Eden right through to Bairnsdale).
Bega to Cooma now also closed.
Batemans Bay to Canberra has been closed for a number of days.
Batemans Bay via Ulladulla to Nowra open again, but subject to closure at any time.
 

·
Champagne Socialist
Joined
·
11,886 Posts
This has an all too familiar Black Saturday feel about the past 24 hours and what's currently happening along the NSW South coast.
 

·
WARREN
Joined
·
8,135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Looks like the NSW South Coast got hit far worse than expected today, as did East Gippsland especially Mallacoota. RIP to those who lost their lives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
745 Posts
Looks like the NSW South Coast got hit far worse than expected today, as did East Gippsland especially Mallacoota. rIP to those who lost their lives.
It came as no surprise to me. I grew up in Ulladulla, the bush was never allowed to get that overgrown when I was growing up. State forests were regularly subject to fuel reduction burns. Every winter, smoke would be coming from somewhere in the bush nearby. Private landowners also burnt off, including my grandfather. Yes, there were still bushfires, but they were nowhere near as frequent or intense as they have become. Then in the late 1980s, early 1990s, that all stopped. The government stopped burning state forests and the burning of private land was banned. So the fuel load grew, the undergrowth became overgrowth. On the last few drives up the south coast to visit family, I could see the overgrown bush, the thick "jungle", the "bearding", that these forests had become, far too far gone for a "controlled burn". It was ready to burn in a catastrophic bushfire. Now here we are.
 

·
Environmental Busybody
Joined
·
13,030 Posts
It's more complicated than that. Too frequent control burns can create more fuel load not less. Amongst other things. Some areas are considered too dangerous to even do control burns, firefighters won't do it.
 

·
Environmental Busybody
Joined
·
13,030 Posts
Like the firefighters were trying to say, the soil moisture has been declining for decades. That means that control burns are getting more and more dangerous to do.

Please lets not make this one more shitty denial thread, with the stock standard ideas trotted out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
745 Posts
Denying what? If it's "more complicated" then we find a more complicated way to reduce fuel load rather than just sit around like lame ducks waiting for the next disaster.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
Like the firefighters were trying to say, the soil moisture has been declining for decades. That means that control burns are getting more and more dangerous to do.

Please lets not make this one more shitty denial thread, with the stock standard ideas trotted out.
Australian rainfall has steadily increased over the last 100 years according to BOM, not decreased:

BOM annual rainfall trend 1900-2018
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
It came as no surprise to me. I grew up in Ulladulla, the bush was never allowed to get that overgrown when I was growing up. State forests were regularly subject to fuel reduction burns. Every winter, smoke would be coming from somewhere in the bush nearby. Private landowners also burnt off, including my grandfather. Yes, there were still bushfires, but they were nowhere near as frequent or intense as they have become. Then in the late 1980s, early 1990s, that all stopped. The government stopped burning state forests and the burning of private land was banned. So the fuel load grew, the undergrowth became overgrowth. On the last few drives up the south coast to visit family, I could see the overgrown bush, the thick "jungle", the "bearding", that these forests had become, far too far gone for a "controlled burn". It was ready to burn in a catastrophic bushfire. Now here we are.
You’re probably on the right path with that thought:

 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
Thanks Danukoz, do you have a source for that image? I would like to follow it up for some personal research.
I don’t have the data set for it as I had it saved in my own notes and research, but didn’t save the link. But I believe it’s from Government of WA fire reduction burning data, crossed with fire frequency data set.

Here is a similar one on page 4, although not quite as up to date.

Prescribed burning
 

·
Environmental Busybody
Joined
·
13,030 Posts
Chasing your tails again seeking to validate what is a simple persons ideology. You must all think we're idiots. Why don't you just bulldoze everything, get it over with, it's what you really want.
 

·
Environmental Busybody
Joined
·
13,030 Posts
I don’t have the data set for it as I had it saved in my own notes and research, but didn’t save the link. But I believe it’s from Government of WA fire reduction burning data, crossed with fire frequency data set.

Here is a similar one on page 4, although not quite as up to date.

Prescribed burning
This paper came out of the same organisation.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318229766_Long-term_studies_of_post-fire_reproduction_in_an_Australian_shrubland_and_woodland
 
1 - 20 of 441 Posts
Top