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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is starting to generate plenty of debate. the State Government will release its 30 year plan for Greater Adelaide on July 7, which will include increasing density in exisiting suburbs and further sprawl.

One of the key things of the plan, is the 14 planned TOD developments at Bowden, Port Adelaide, Cheltenham, Elizabeth, Mawson Lakes, Noarlunga, West Lakes, Marion, Mitcham, Modbury etc. which will help increase density in existing suburbs.

Bowden Village (3km north west of the CBD) will be one of the biggest TOD projects, it will feature retail outlets, cafes, restaurants and around 1500 apartments (rising to 10-15 levels)

While the urban boundary will be likely be extended further out north, south and south east. Much of the growth will be centred around Gawler, Mt Barker-Nairne, Seaford-Aldinga-Sellicks and the planned northern satellite city for 33,000 residents with low-medium density apartments in the city centre.

Even Murray Bridge (75km east of Adelaide) will be included in the 30-year plan.

And who knows there could be a few surprises for the Adelaide CBD and inner burbs *fingers cross*

The plan is apart of the State Government's goal of 2 million people by 2050, though latest predictions show that SA will reach 2m by 2025-30.


Battle of Mt Barker's sprawl
http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/story/0,22606,25699927-2682,00.html

RENATO CASTELLO
June 27, 2009 11:30pm

MT Barker is becoming a battleground in the war between urban sprawl and rural living, with a secret consortium of developers invited to redraw its boundaries.

Planning Minister Paul Holloway has invited the developers to do their own review of land use in and around Mt Barker's current township boundary, without consulting the local council or community and keeping the identities of the developers secret.

The giant Walker Corporation, the developer behind the controversial satellite suburb of Buckland Park, north of Adelaide, is understood to be involved.

Concerns are emerging that expanding Mt Barker, SA's fastest-growing township, and nearby towns would lead to an onslaught of development at the expense of prime farming land and the area's rural character.

The Mt Barker invitation comes as the Sunday Mail has learned developers are also primed to build new satellite cities at Roseworthy and Concordia, north of Gawler, if the Government agrees to rezone them for housing.

The SA Farmers Federation (SAFF) has warned key agricultural parcels in Adelaide's north and on the Fleurieu Peninsula are vulnerable.

The Government is expected to release a 30-year plan for Greater Adelaide on July 7. It will recommend urban expansion on broadacre land in the Adelaide Hills, around Murray Bridge, the Adelaide Plains and the Fleurieu Peninsula.

Its aim is to provide a 25-year rolling supply of land to meet anticipated future housing demand and satisfy the Government's controversial population goal of two million people by 2050.

SAFF chief executive and Hills resident Carol Vincent said there was widespread concern around Mt Barker and among farmers about the impact of increasing development on existing infrastructure and on agriculture.

"I've been talking to people in the community, not just farmers, and there seems to be an overall disillusionment that they have no real ability to determine the future of the region," she said.

"In Mt Barker, the housing has crept on to the edge of farming properties and I know that developers are circling like piranhas and have made offers (to buy farming land).

"We have got to get this on a wider political agenda and in the public eye because it's not just Mt Barker, it's all the areas where there is good agricultural land."

Ms Vincent will chair a meeting organised by Greens MLC Mark Parnell at Mt Barker on July 7 so the public can "get some answers" about the impending planning reforms.

"This is a big issue, it is the battleground and I want to give people a genuine opportunity to be part of this debate," Mr Parnell said.

"The question is the future of the greater Adelaide area and whether we want dormitory suburbs further and further out of Adelaide.

"The Government keeps pushing out the urban boundary, but the reason it is there is to stop urban sprawl."

The Sunday Mail has learned major Australian developer Urban Pacific Limited has options to buy a big swathe of broadacre land at Concordia, east of Gawler - with 15,000 homes planned.

The Hickinbotham Group has significant land holdings at Roseworthy and also is spearheading lobbying by other landowners to have their land rezoned for housing.

Neither Urban Pacific nor the Hickinbotham Group would comment publicly and Mr Holloway did not respond to repeated calls to his office.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Heres a artist impression of Bowden Village @ the old Clipsal site. The precinct will also include office buildings and former warehouses will be transformed into apartments
 

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I agree, it looks nice, except for the token windmills. A bit... yeah.

I'm a bit suspicious of 30 year plans when we only have 4 year governments.
 

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I trying to think how much land there is at Mitcham for a TOD, and theres hardly any. Are they going to redevelop the shopping centre or something.

Also, I believe Plympton is being planned for a little TOD
 

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Mawson Lakes is one TOD already under-construction and so far its been pretty successful, with a whole bunch of apartment blocks completed and more have just started construction.

I've only got 2 small problems with it tho:

- there is nothing taller than 5 floors, but there is still plenty of land around, perhaps they will come later
- and buses from Mawson Interchange are useless for people who actually live in Mawson Lakes, the 411 as a feeder bus is frequent but it doesnt go into Mawson Lakes it goes to Salisbury via somewhere that isnt mawson lakes, the 222-224 is the most useless feeder bus ever, most of the time it arrives just after the Adelaide train has departed and departs just before the train to Gawler has arrived, timetables need to be adjusted IMO.
 

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Mawson Lakes wasn't really a TOD to begin with, it was originally going to be detached sprawl, like its southern areas are. The train station was an afterthought, even if it seems obvious today. The hight limits are there for obvious reasons. Parafield is home to many flight schools!

Adelaide Metro does seem to fail miserably at feeder buses for trains.

The Government is expected to release a 30-year plan for Greater Adelaide on July 7. It will recommend urban expansion on broadacre land in the Adelaide Hills, around Murray Bridge, the Adelaide Plains and the Fleurieu Peninsula.

Its aim is to provide a 25-year rolling supply of land to meet anticipated future housing demand and satisfy the Government's controversial population goal of two million people by 2050.
Sigh. If that's how the government wishes to meet the population targets, then many of the infrastructure problems predicted by naysayers may actually come true.
 

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found another article on this 2day on Adelaide now:

http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/story/0,22606,25739496-5006301,00.html



RUSSELL EMMERSON, STATE POLITICAL REPORTER

July 06, 2009 12:11pm

ADELAIDE will become a city of green transport corridors and mixed housing-business developments under a new 30-year development plan.

The existing city will be the focal point for an expected 560,000 people in 258,000 new homes, according to the State Government plan, and will give rise to another 282,000 jobs.

Urban Planning Minister Paul Holloway said about 70 per cent of the new housing will be within the current city limits - a ploy designed to reduce the sprawl, but also to cater for an ageing population that is within walking distance of public transport.

"These (suburbs) will be walkable, connected and safe precincts that allow people to work, shop and access services near their homes, and which are located near parklands, waterways and vibrant cultural centres," he said.

Transport corridors will receive a special planning designation to cut across council boundaries and politics, and a new planning scheme would allow for more flexible developments in these areas, he said.

Expansion outside Adelaide will target a doubling of Roseworthy, and a steady expansion of Murray Bridge, Mount Barker and Goolwa.

The plan has also included a Hills railway to connect Murray Bridge to Mullala in the Barossa Valley.

While the plan will be open for consultation and submissions until the end of September, Mr Holloway said there was a need to put forward a plan that would guide the city's development over the long term.

"What we need to do is rebalance our growth," he said.

He said Virginia, McLaren Vale and the Barossa Valley had been protected to save agricultural and wine regions from intrusion.

Local Government Association president Felicity-Ann Lewis said the plan was needed, but the state government needed to ensure it took an inclusive approach.

"At the local government level, we must be assured that the three spheres of government work together to ensure that the development and ongoing maintenance of current and new infrastructure is well researched and appropriately funded," she said.

"Where there are plans for housing developments there must also be plans for schools, parks and open spaces, community sporting facilities and other vital infrastructure required to create and support new communities."

The head of South Australia's Urban Development Institute, Ian Marker, said the group had already identified a need for more land to be released to house the state's growing population.

"We urge the Government to implement the 30-year Plan promptly and monitor the supply of appropriately-zoned land and the pipeline for controlled development of the greater Adelaide area," he said.

"Maintaining an adequate supply of developed allotments during the next few years - at both greenfield and inner-city sites - will be critical to avoid price escalation and decreasing affordability."

Property Council executive director Nathan Paine said the plan was likely to draw criticisms, but the city needed a longer-term overview to avoid the mistakes of ad-hoc growth.

"This plan builds on all the good work to date by promoting further growth through urban in-fill aligned with a massive investment in public transport," he said.

"There is no doubt that there will be critics in the community of this plan. It is time for these naysayers - opponents to economic growth, jobs and affordable housing for South Australia's youth - to take a back seat and allow the state to grow along its natural path.

"We need sustained and sustainable population growth to ensure we can cater for the needs of our aging population. Without it, our state faces terminal decline and the denial of our potential."
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Full kudos to the State Government, very happy with this plan.

"These (suburbs) will be walkable, connected and safe precincts that allow people to work, shop and access services near their homes, and which are located near parklands, waterways and vibrant cultural centres," he said.

Transport corridors will receive a special planning designation to cut across council boundaries and politics, and a new planning scheme would allow for more flexible developments in these areas, he said.
Good news, this will cut red tape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Another good read.

Planning the Adelaide we all want - plan for Greater Adelaide
http://www.dplg.sa.gov.au/plan4adelaide/index.cfm

70% of the expected population growth (392,000) will happen in existing Adelaide, with the main focal points being the CBD/inner suburbs and along major transport corridors. While the other 30% of growth (170,000) will happen on the urban fringe.

Total = 560,000 extra people (size of the Gold Coast) will be living in Adelaide when the state turns 200 in 2036, though population growth could be even higher.

If it all goes to plan density levels in the city and suburbs will increase dramatically in the future, making Adelaide a very different city to what it is now.
 

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It is a very interesting document and is worth the 40mb download to read.

Some of the timelines and 'proposed' new transport corridors look interesting as well such as:
Rail to Aldinga
Rail to Buckland Park
Rail to Roseworthy

I am still sifting through the plan but it seems quite good at the moment. Lets hope most of it comes into fruition - especially considering I live near one of these corridors :)
 

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Very interesting, thanks for posting and updating :)

I imagine that there will be a fair amount of opposition to greater densities etc, just like in Brisbane, but it is a good idea and that artist's impression looks great!
 

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Can someone explain to me where the 560,000 people are coming from, based on Adelaide's current population growth of about 13,000 per year?
 

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I think it is to do with the fact that after the GFC is over, we are expected to have a huge mining boom, as well as further cementing ourselves as the defense capital of Australia.
 
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