SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A neat website by a York University urban planning masters student, that may be useful in costing estimates for your fantasy subway project in whatever North American city you live in. The per km numbers are based on Toronto's subway system, and are in Canadian Dollars (CDN).

http://www.drlnow.ca/costanalysis.html

The following is a list of projects that have been constructed or proposed in the last ten years. Due to a difference in labour laws and regulations in Europe, the data has been limited to recent North American construction, where although laws may differ slightly, no major variations occur.

Precedents

Fyi, it should be noted that Vancouver's 20.3km Millenium Line (finished 2002) was built for $1.1 billion, only $160 million more than the 6km Sheppard Subway, but with 3 times the length and over twice the ridership. This was made possible because the line is elevated, which based on the below table is roughly half as expensive per km than that of a tunnel.

Typical costs per km of construction (in Toronto)


Two cities stand out when compared to the cost of projects in Toronto, which have more than doubled in cost estimates for the past decade. Montreal: and New York.

On the cheaper end of construction, Montreal should be studied as to why it is able to deliver subway at a substantially lower cost per kilometre than we have been able to in Toronto.

In Montreal, we have the benefit of seeing both a recently constructed project (the orange line to Montmorency in Laval) as well as a number of proposed projects. Costs range from $143 million to $173 million per kilometre, a cost half that of modern subways in Toronto such as the Spadina extension and the North Yonge extension. Unlike several other cheaper projects that have been constructed or proposed in North America, Montreal’s subway construction is entirely tunnelled, with no sections at grade. The Laval extension in particular had the challenge of tunnelling under the Rivière des Prairies, and still was able to complete construction at a cost of $143 million/km. As nice as it would be to be able to build the Downtown Relief Line for this sort of cost, unfortunately it is not feasible. As well as being of a different geology than the City of Toronto67, a more important factor for Montreal is the width of their trains. Due to thinner trains, Montreal is able to construct their system using one large bored tunnel with multiple tracks rather than being forced to construct two smaller tunnels54. This can reduce tunnelling costs substantially with half as much tunnel required for construction.

On the other end of the spectrum, New York suffers from significantly higher tunnelling and construction costs, with the MTA stating the following in regards to the costs of the Second Avenue Subway.

Our partners in the contracting community tell us that they are forced to charge more for our projects to protect against the perceived risks of working with the MTA and to compensate for the difficult environment of working around service and the complexity of each project. In addition, construction industry practices in New York tend to increase costs. As an example, tunnelling for the expansion projects has cost between three and six times as much as similar projects in Germany, France and Italy162

Because other cities may be substantially cheaper or costlier than Toronto, their estimates are not as relevant to the costing of the Downtown Relief Line, and are simply provided for the sake of comparison. Because we have recent construction cost estimates in Toronto, we can use those as a base for estimations of the cost of the Downtown Relief Line with much greater accuracy.


Source: http://www.drlnow.ca/costanalysis.html
 

·
Agenda 21 Advocate
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
I never knew the Red Line-Blue Line connector was that cheap. I guess Bostonians just like to whine.

Well, okay, perhaps "cheap" is a bit relative, considering that the T is up to its neck in debt.

*actually, is there a way to move my post to the US version of the thread or is it legit over here?*
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I quoted and responded to your question on the other thread. But yeah, $478 million per km isn't cheap.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It started out as roughly $2 billion, where the feds committed exactly 1/3 like they do for most transit projects in Ontario, which is $697 million. The estimate went up to $2.63 billion and the feds are expected to meet the 1/3 requirement. Haven't heard any new numbers since.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top