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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would be interested to know if anyone knows of any other bridges using this mode of construction:

The Geelong (Barwon River) Ovoid Sewer Aqueduct: Victoria, Australia



This bridge was designed and constructed by Edward Giles Stone & Ernest J. Siddeley, and as a reinforced concrete replica of the Firth of Forth Bridge in Scotland, it's a rather unique piece of engineering.



Constructed 1912- 1915, it carried the sewerage from Geelong to an outfall into Bass Strait from 1915 till it was superseded in 1992.



At 756 metres in length, and comprising 13 main spans (14 cantilevered pylons), it is difficult to get an overall idea of its size. It lies behind private property- farms and factories- in the suburb of Breakwater. Deterioration of the concrete is apparent in the image below:



Each span is about fifty metres:



Cracks in the concrete were identified as early as 1922. Although there is a substantial walkway on top of the pipe, Barwon Water (its owner) makes it quite clear that no access to the bridge is now permitted. The southern-most pylon is now supported by steel framework: and heavily guarded by fences and numerous notices threatening indefinite detention should one jump the fence ... note the patch-work on the lower right.

 

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Most probably yes, a very interesting design, never seen sth like that before! And it looks far larger than it actually is
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Most probably yes, a very interesting design, never seen sth like that before! And it looks far larger than it actually is
Certainly not particularly high, but about 3/4 km long. My concern is the concrete is corroding: it should be saved. Especially if it's the only one in the world, and even if it was only used to cart crap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Interesting indeed. The Lafayette Bridge is indeed a reinforced concrete structure, but it a truss bridge, not a cantilever bridge (there are varieties of truss bridge, and I might once have been able to name this particular form of truss, but it escapes me for now).

Do you know when it was built? It looks reasonably and well maintained. Undoubtedly the same engineering problems involved in fixing reinforced concrete members together would have arisen here.

The cantilevered bridge which I started this thread off reflects the design of the Firth of Forth railway bridge north of Edinburgh, Scotland: I don't have an image of it readily available, but it was constructed of metal (steel tube for the big bits, I believe), rather than reinforced concrete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
That looks like a concrete cantilevered bridge to me! Can anyone confirm that the truss work is indeed reinforced concrete, not steel?
 
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