Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Suspended
Joined
·
733 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I know the title is in bad taste.


I made the short 65 mile drive from Pittsburgh to the nearby city of Johnstown. Johnstown is the closest Pennsylvania "city" of any real significance, to Pittsburgh.

First I stopped along the way in the small town of Blairsville.











Johnstown is still very much industrial. Much more so than Pittsburgh is. It kind of reminds me of a small 1960's style Pittsburgh. The city is very gritty, but not really slummy. There is no large nasty area unless I missed it. The neighborhoods are for the most part decent. Due to the extremely rugged topography, the layout of the city is very haphazard. A good amount of the urban areas lie outside the city limits, thus the city is actually a good bit bigger than it's population indicates.





There are few rowhouses here, but the common Pennsylvania stoop front houses are here. Double houses, so common in Pennsylvania, abound here.




Downtown.































The Inclined Plane.








From the top of the incline. (Note the factories)





















Found a row!




This style of house can be found in nearly every Pa. town.











This could be virtually anywhere in Pennsylvania outside of Philly.














Bye!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,973 Posts
I've actually heard a lot of reference to the great flood that hit this city... anyone know how serious it was? Did it like wipe out everything? And weren't there two?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,034 Posts
Holy pictures, Batman!

Nice looking city. It's good to see that some places can still rely somewhat on manufacturing/factory jobs and still survive.
ROCguy said:
I've actually heard a lot of reference to the great flood that hit this city... anyone know how serious it was? Did it like wipe out everything? And weren't there two?
I've heard it related to Buffalo blizzards a few times. Johnstown seems to have a similar [even more undeserved] stigma, I think to alot of people the city is defined by that one event. Just like we're not buried under 16 feet of snow in July, Johnstown doesn't spend 95% of the year underwater. A one-time, freak event. (Though I think there were 2 as well?)

I used to have a t-shirt or something with the Inclined Plane. My grandparents used to visit there occasionally, not entirely sure why. My grandfather enjoys caves, aren't there several around that area? Maybe that's why.
 

·
7th generation SoBoean
Joined
·
666 Posts
My Great Grandmother was born in Wales in 1886 and was sent to live with her grandmother at the age of three in 1889, in Johnstown. I don't know if it was before or after the flood, which I believe occurred in today's date, May 30th....or was it the 31st? Either way, she and my great-great-great-grandmother survived the flood. I'm not sure of the details, because my great grandmother died from the Spanish flu of 1918, when my grandmother was only 9. Anyway, I have a connection to Johnstown, and its great flood, so I really appreciate this tour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,397 Posts
Great pictures, as always. I think the cities of PA and the upper Ohio Valley are, on the whole, the most beautiful in the country. The combination of old buildings and rugged topography are unmatched anywhere else in the US. Great work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,111 Posts
The flood was caused by a dam break during a really bad spell of heavy rains. The dam was originally built to create a canal system over the mountains but was eventually abandoned. Some rich steel barrens bought the dam and lake that it created for a country hunting retreat but never carried out routine maintenance on the dam. The break sent a massive wall of water and mud down the valley slamming into the town. I think remnants of the dam are still in place. There is a really good book out there that describes the whole thing.

Interestin thing. Most of those buildings shown here are from after the flood. They would be the buildings built to replace the destroyed town. The people that built them may have included some of survivors
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
SoBoChris said:
My Great Grandmother was born in Wales in 1886 and was sent to live with her grandmother at the age of three in 1889, in Johnstown. I don't know if it was before or after the flood, which I believe occurred in today's date, May 30th....or was it the 31st? Either way, she and my great-great-great-grandmother survived the flood. I'm not sure of the details, because my great grandmother died from the Spanish flu of 1918, when my grandmother was only 9. Anyway, I have a connection to Johnstown, and its great flood, so I really appreciate this tour.
Your great grandmother survived the Johnstown flood, but died from the 1918 Spanish Flu? That's a very interesting family history!
 

·
7th generation SoBoean
Joined
·
666 Posts
Huck said:
Your great grandmother survived the Johnstown flood, but died from the 1918 Spanish Flu? That's a very interesting family history!
Yeah, my grandmom was only nine when her mom died, and she left home at the age of 10 because her step father was an ass. Either way, she knew very little about the actual events, but once I started working on my family tree, I found out all of the facts. I'd definitely found out a lot about my family. One branch I can trace back over 560 years! It's amazing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,973 Posts
How the hell does a 10 year old girl make it on her own.... I seriously hope it's not what I'm thinking.
 

·
7th generation SoBoean
Joined
·
666 Posts
ROCguy said:
How the hell does a 10 year old girl make it on her own.... I seriously hope it's not what I'm thinking.
She was a housekeeper. She worked for one woman for a number of years until she got a job at the Hotel Bethlehem. She worked there until she became pregnant (out of wedlock), and the hotel fired her. It was 1925, America didn't respond well with that sort of situation. Trust me, I could write an entire book on my grandmother. You'd think after such a hard life, she'd have an easy death, but that wasn't even to be the case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,973 Posts
That's really sad. The coolest thing in my family is how on my mom's side, there is a town named after us, Trumansburg , NY(formerly Tremainsburg but the dumbass residents were arguing over the spelling of my great great great however many great's Grandfather Abner TREMAINE spelled his last name, because when the town was founded in the 1790's, it was pronounced sort of like Truman, but now, we pronounce it Tree-main.). It's in Tompkins county, Northwest of Ithaca. Abner TREMAINE served under George Washington in the battle of Saratoga. So my family has a LONG history in Upstate NY.
 

·
Suspended
Joined
·
733 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
ROCguy said:
How the hell does a 10 year old girl make it on her own.... I seriously hope it's not what I'm thinking.
My grandad lost both his parents before age five (1880's). After living with an adult sister, and her abusive husband, his 9 year old brother struck out on his own. One year later, my 7 year old grandad joined him. They were independent from that point on. (Both lived into their 80's). In the rural south at that time, urchins could survive by going from farm to farm, begging and doing odd jobs.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top