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In London:

- The poorer areas (most deprivation) are predominantly on the inner eastern side of the city geographically. The east London boroughs of Tower Hamlets and Newham always rank as the worst. Other boroughs in inner south-east and north-east London rank at the top.

- The most dangerous (high crime) areas are predominantly in the inner south side of the city: The south London boroughs of Lambeth, Southwark always rank as the worst. Other boroughs in inner south-east and north-east London rank at the top.

Map of London's Deprivation


- The rich part of town is the inner west side of London. Mayfair, Kensington, Knightsbridge and surrounding areas usually command the highest prices:

Map of London house prices



East London and South London are 'generally' considered poorer and more dangerous, whereas West London and North London are 'generally' considered richer and less dangerous.
 

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Rome is quite mixed, you may not always find a clear division between the "rich" neighbourhoods and the "poor" ones, although general patterns exist. Sometimes the same street can be expensive or cheap, depending on which end are you considering. However, if you ask you'll be answered that central and northern parts are rich while the eastern ones are poor.

The city center is, of course, very expensive, expecially in those streets nearest to the most important monuments and landmarks. But there are some spots which are comparatively poor, like some areas around the train station that are renowned for being full of chinese immigrants.
The northern neighbourhoods are often wealthy, expensive and full of green spaces. However there are some "less rich" spots mostly on the northenmost outskirts, far from the center.
The south side and the west side and also the southeast are well mixed: there are some neighbourhoods which have a reputation for being poor and dangerous, but usually these sides are not that bad and are mostly middle to upper middle class areas. The countryside around the Via Appia Antica (south-southeast of the center) is worth mentioning, it is one of the richest areas of the city and there are no flats or apartments but only large villas; however it is not a real neighbourhood.
The east side is the poorest one (and I'd say the ugliest), thus following an usual pattern in Europe.
 

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Mr.Br*gthside
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Lima is a very complicated case, its all mixed up. Traditionally the rich areas inside the city proper (purple) are the south and west parts, theres where rich people moved once the city centre started to run down in the 60s. This is because the poor always lived north of the city since colonial times, in the district of Rimac, outside the city walls. Althought there where some working class neighbourhoods in the south of the city walls too like Breña.

In the 60s-80s the huge rural-urban migration make up a cordon of poverty around the city, known as the "Cones". However the economic stability of the 90s and the subsequent economic boom since 2002 created the conditions for the arise of a big emerging middle class in the outskirts. Today the North Cone concentrates 70% of the city´s high class (in monetary terms). But the traditional european-inspired high class remains in the southern districts of the city proper (purple area).

The Metropolitan area is divided in 43 districts which are grouped in 5 macrodistricts as shown below:



The purple area is the city proper. Its mostly middle and upper middle class. However, it has very rich areas in the south part of it (Barranco, San Isidro, Surco, parts of Miraflores) and very rundown areas, specially in the north part of it (Cercado, Rimac, Breña).

This is an aerial view of part of the city proper (purple area). In green I delimited run down middle-low class areas. The rest is mostly middle and upper middle class.



City proper northern area (old, run down, poorer)



City proper southern area (newer, richer)






In the map the northern brown area is the city emerging area for excellence. Huge shopping centres and massive housing projects but still lot of poverty. The green area has some of the richest neighbourhoods in the city in La Molina district but also extended poverty. The yellow area is El Callao. Where the port and airport are located. Some of the most dangerous neighbourhoods like The Barracones are here but also some of the citys nicest like La Punta.

Finnally the southern cone and "little south" (orange area) that has some very depressed neighbourhoods bordering the city proper (purple area), but also some really nice places to live in front of the sea. I think the largest contrasts are here. However, this area is still mostly "virgin" with big valleys, expanded desert dunes (This is where this years Dakar started), beautiful coastline, etc.

In this picture you can see the big contrast of the southern cone, with high class neighbourhoods in the beach front and the shanty towns at the bottom of the picture, mixed with industry.



Rich beachfront neighbourhoods





Shanty towns



Contrast seen from a pre-inca ruin

 

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Mr.Br*gthside
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Cool. Im not fond on MVLL but I guess its worth checking them. I think other authors portrait that 20th century social differences better like Alfredo Bryce Echenique in his book A World for Julius. The famous Peruvian photographer Mario Testino has also made a copilation of pictures that shows the two sides of Lima.
 

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Lima is a very complicated case, its all mixed up. Traditionally the rich areas inside the city proper (purple) are the south and west parts, theres where rich people moved once the city centre started to run down in the 60s. This is because the poor always lived north of the city since colonial times, in the district of Rimac, outside the city walls. Althought there where some working class neighbourhoods in the south of the city walls too like Breña.

In the 60s-80s the huge rural-urban migration make up a cordon of poverty around the city, known as the "Cones". However the economic stability of the 90s and the subsequent economic boom since 2002 created the conditions for the arise of a big emerging middle class in the outskirts. Today the North Cone concentrates 70% of the city´s high class (in monetary terms). But the traditional european-inspired high class remains in the southern districts of the city proper (purple area).

The Metropolitan area is divided in 43 districts which are grouped in 5 macrodistricts as shown below:



The purple area is the city proper. Its mostly middle and upper middle class. However, it has very rich areas in the south part of it (Barranco, San Isidro, Surco, parts of Miraflores) and very rundown areas, specially in the north part of it (Cercado, Rimac, Breña).

This is an aerial view of part of the city proper (purple area). In green I delimited run down middle-low class areas. The rest is mostly middle and upper middle class.



City proper northern area (old, run down, poorer)



City proper southern area (newer, richer)






In the map the northern brown area is the city emerging area for excellence. Huge shopping centres and massive housing projects but still lot of poverty. The green area has some of the richest neighbourhoods in the city in La Molina district but also extended poverty. The yellow area is El Callao. Where the port and airport are located. Some of the most dangerous neighbourhoods like The Barracones are here but also some of the citys nicest like La Punta.

Finnally the southern cone and "little south" (orange area) that has some very depressed neighbourhoods bordering the city proper (purple area), but also some really nice places to live in front of the sea. I think the largest contrasts are here. However, this area is still mostly "virgin" with big valleys, expanded desert dunes (This is where this years Dakar started), beautiful coastline, etc.

In this picture you can see the big contrast of the southern cone, with high class neighbourhoods in the beach front and the shanty towns at the bottom of the picture, mixed with industry.



Rich beachfront neighbourhoods





Shanty towns



Contrast seen from a pre-inca ruin

^^ My, my, my... Those are stunning shots that made me believe, "hey, why not put those on Urban Showcase?" But, hey, you made a really good observation on how Lima's housing population situation is quite mixed... and it's fascinating to see that while such buildings in the central area may look grand, it's better to look down at street level and see what families are really up to. Sometimes, what you see from above may not necessarily tell you the whole story.
 

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XPC Fagua chinanuca
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In Colombia cities are "stratified" in accordance to the average income and quality of housing, this is so in order to distinguish public utilities tariffs and assign social security and investment priorities. Strata 1 and 2 are considered "poor", 3 and 4 "medium" and 5 and 6 "rich". Coincidently it has been also used as the politically correct way to refer to High or Low classes.

The following map reflects Bogotá's stratification


Generally the North is the richer area of the city, whereas the South is the poorest, the zones highlighted as "Estrato 1" are the worst shanty-towns in the city, inhabited mainly by people migrating from the countryside of Colombia, in many cases due to the armed conflict and violence. The poorest parts being Usme, Ciudad Bolivar and Bosa.

The usual rich zone was the City Centre (Santafé and Candelaria Boroughs), but throughout the 20th Century the rich continuously moved to the north, mainly to Usaquén and Chapinero.

Between the 1980s and the 1990s the traditional City Centre and CBD are seen as the most dangerous parts of the city (curiously the most prestigious universities, and the main Government institutions remained there) and so satellite CBDs have been built amidst the new rich zones. Since the turn of the century there has been a process of urban renewal and gentrification that pretends to stop the migration of business to the north and create an "extended CBD" mainly in Chapinero and Santa Fé boroughs.
 
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In Barcelona the upper city areas are the wealthiest. The right side of the city is generally speaking the poorest.

The largest wealth gap between bordering areas is the new swanky Diagonal Mar area on the coast and the working class area of Besos/Maresme next door.

In the old town the Gotic area has about an average GDP/capita but the Raval area on the other hand is much poorer.

 

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Dietrich von Welschbern
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In Brussels the worst areas are immediately to the west and to the north of the city center. It is, though, a city of contrasts. It can change from a decayed area to a wealthy posh neighbourhood within a couple of blocks.
 

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In NYC it varies by borough.

In Manhattan the dividing line would be 100th street. North is mostly lower and lower middle where as south of it is very posh and expensive. The middle class in Manhattan is almost non existent.

The Bronx is majority lower and lower middle. Brooklyn and Queens are mixed. Staten Island is mostly middle class with pockets of lower around stapleton.
 

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Mr.Br*gthside
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^^ My, my, my... Those are stunning shots that made me believe, "hey, why not put those on Urban Showcase?" But, hey, you made a really good observation on how Lima's housing population situation is quite mixed... and it's fascinating to see that while such buildings in the central area may look grand, it's better to look down at street level and see what families are really up to. Sometimes, what you see from above may not necessarily tell you the whole story.
Thanks. Im glad you like it.

Limas old historic centre is stunning but unfortunately very run down (as happened in Bogota like Chibcha says in his post). Today there are some important efforts to recover this area and in fact a lot of progress has been done with some major business moving back, opening of modern malls, making some streets pedestrian, banning informal commerce, some gentrification projects, improving access (BRT, Metroline, Expressways, etc). But still lots of buildings are in really bad conditions and with many poor families living in little space.
 

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Mr.Br*gthside
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Santiago, Chile

The darkest, the richest

The richest is in the North-east part: Lo Barnechea, Vitacura, Las Condes, Providencia

 

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amai
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In terms of income, the southeast of Brussels is by far the richest. But in general, income segregation in Brussels is much less severe than Paris for example.
 

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Dietrich von Welschbern
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In terms of income, the southeast of Brussels is by far the richest. But in general, income segregation in Brussels is much less severe than Paris for example.
You're right, there are no real ghettos, even though the difference between the neighbor districts of Saint Josse and the European District is striking.
Unlike Paris the outskirts are no places for segregation, since the poorest areas are next to the centre, to its north-east and to its south-west.
 

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Paris - Ile de France
Median income by consumer unit in 2004

Darker is the colors, higher is the median income

The reality is more complicated than a wealthy centers and poor outskirts.
The poor/rich separation is more East/West in Paris
 

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Discussion Starter #39
not all outskirts are poor in Paris , Paris has very wealthy outskirts to the west of Paris and some to the southwest
 

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Ars longa, vita brevis
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Paris - Ile de France
Median income by consumer unit in 2004

Darker is the colors, higher is the median income

The reality is more complicated than a wealthy centers and poor outskirts.
The poor/rich separation is more East/West in Paris
Great graphic, thanks. It confirms all my impressions.
Interesting to see how right above the dark-coloured Defense there is a fully white unit.
 
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