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there is not such pattern or classes in Japan
even though rich people live in poor area, they would not move
i think rich Japanese homes are traditionally surrounded by walls. so they dont care about outside
and there is no inconvenient things in neighborhood..
and the Japanese tend to pretend poor.
Isn't those living in "danchis" are lower or working class?

 

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^^ But usually in the West, public housing is mostly populated by working class.
 

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^^ But usually in the West, public housing is mostly populated by working class.
Japan has high class to "low" class "public" housing. I would say most danchi tend to be for more working class people but that doesn't answer the thread at all since it says "areas"...you can have a poor danchi next to semi rich houses or expensive condominiums for example.
 

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^^ Hmmm, your two maps show a very telling story about wealth and poverty in São Paulo and Londrina. With São Paulo, the concentration of high-wealth communities seem to be clustered in the central part of the city, and as one moves further away from it, it becomes poorer. In Londrina, however, there is a small rich area in the center and another in the southwestern part of the city, while the rest are like middle class going down the ladder, and what strikes me is that with the southwest, immediately north of it is a very poor area. Hmmm, what are those districts, and what makes one of them very rich and its next door neighbor very poor?
It's funny because the contrast between rich and poor areas are way strong in São Paulo than in Londrina (the inequality is smaller in the southern states). Also, you'll see extreme wealth areas in São Paulo with some pockets of slum nearby. Also we must bear in mind the cost of living is way smaller in Londrina

Anyway, about the red vs purple in Londrina:



In the upper left we have the Olímpico, the "red" district. The "purple" are the several gated communities, west of Catuaí Shopping Mall. On the upper centre we have the University of Londrina (UEL) and on the upper right, part of Downtown (the quadrilateral) and the booming district, Gleba Palhano (south shore), just across the Igapó lakes.
 

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in peru richest areas would be the capital Lima with areas south of peru
 

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This idea of west being wealthy ath centurynd east being poor can be traced back to early industrial Europe. The Atlantic winds would blow in from the west, and push all of the smog from downtown towards the east. The wealthy would be able to live away from the smog, while the poorer people would live in the low valued east because that was the only area they could afford.
Thanks for the explanation. I read in Hobsbawm's The age of revolution that this is almost a universal European pattern, but he never explains why.

There could be many reasons to deviate from this rule however. In Brussels for example, the rich parts of town are in the east (uptown), while the lower western parts of town have always been poor. Until the second half of the 19th century, the Senne river valley was a very unhealthy place because the river was litterally an open sewer. On the other hand, this river (and later the canal) could be a source of income for the poor.

Edit:
Well nevermind, I see that it has been explained already :)

In Antwerp, the north is poorer, more industrial and more working class because fo the docks and the south is more posh and residential. Still, it's hard to generalize and it has varied over time. The famous posh southern quarter, for example, has been impoverished for some time during the 20th century when the whole city centre was declining and the rich people were moving to the suburbs. Today the evolution has reversed and even the area near the old docks in the north is gentrifying rapidly.
 

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In Leeds, the northern parts of the city are vastly wealthier than the other parts. East and south Leeds are more working-class with higher levels of poverty (generally speaking). There are exceptions to this rule, obviously.
 

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in peru richest areas would be the capital Lima with areas south of peru
Broer si no entiendes el tema del hilo o no hablas ingles mejor ni comentes porque quedas mal. Estan hablando de ciudades no de países. Yo ya hice una explicación bien detallada de Lima en la página dos. Sobre Peru en general, salvo la costa sur, la región sur es la más pobre (Puno, Ayacucho, Apurimac y Huancavelica son los 4 departamentos mas pobres, todos en el sur).
 

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Broer si no entiendes el tema del hilo o no hablas ingles mejor ni comentes porque quedas mal. Estan hablando de ciudades no de países. Yo ya hice una explicación bien detallada de Lima en la página dos. Sobre Peru en general, salvo la costa sur, la región sur es la más pobre (Puno, Ayacucho, Apurimac y Huancavelica son los 4 departamentos mas pobres, todos en el sur).
lo dije por arequipa es una ciudad con algo de mejor calidad de vida que las ciudades norteñas como trujillo,piura,...

si arequipa,moquegua,tacna, tienen algo de ricos que las del norte
 

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lo dije por arequipa es una ciudad con algo de mejor calidad de vida que las ciudades norteñas como trujillo,piura,...

si arequipa,moquegua,tacna, tienen algo de ricos que las del norte
...igual eso no tiene nada que ver con el tema...

...instead in Peruvian cities there is not a special pattern, the wealthiest areas always have been closer to the city centre and the poor areas in the far surroundings. The different geography at our cities makes it change, like in Trujillo were the wealthiest area is in the south, or in Cusco were is at the east; trying to take advantage of a better weather or the views of an elevated zone(or other amenities like private forest areas or the country side)......
 

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In Charlotte, NC it seems to be the opposite: The higher value neighborhoods lie to the south and east, while the poorer ones cluster to the west and northern parts of the city.
 

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Amsterdam

The average income per capita in the red areas is about 4 times as high as in the deep blue areas. Income distribution in the Netherlands is reasonably equal.

Municipalities of Amsterdam, Amstelveen and Ouder-Amstel


Larger metro:


(I hope linking to Picasa Web works.)
 

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Discussion Starter #75
I am loving this thread , I am glad I started , a lot of great responses and very interesting also where I live in very unusual , I live in a nice condo complex but it is mixed income , some are renters , some are owners and some are vacationers . We have mix of college students , families with young children and some with older teens , young professionals , senior citizens ( some are snow birds , others are all year ) we even have multiple generations in some households . we have poor / section 8, working class , middle class , upper class and even wealthy people living in our complex . We also have some units for people with special needs . Around our condo complex we are surrounded by every type of income from extremely poor neighborhoods to multimillion dollars homes and everything in between .
 

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Behold! the city of Jakarta!


despite our country ranking quiet low in wealth gap this is still happening! rich and poor housing are scattered throughout the city, there are many rich suburbs but as well rich residential within the city and the coast, while the poor exist in many part of the city. Those housing there are called "kampong" its more or less mid-low housing area...

The southern part of the city are the "beverly hills" of Jakarta housing politician, actresses, business people and no doubt you will see rows of mansions and condos on this part of the city! The Central area is more or less the middle-upper class area with many condos, west part of the city are more or less middle-lower but, north is similar but there are quiet a few rich housing there, while the east is probably the poorest among all but not extremely and industrial zone of the city.

slums? they are mostly along the riverside and outside town
 

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Obviously, poverty in most parts of Western and Central Europe isn't the same thing as in developing countries, however, there are also some areas where the social divide is very present.

Here is a shot of an outer borough of Berlin:
The railroad tracks in the south are some kind of a "wall" between an average middle-class area and social housing projects. The same goes for the large avenue in the center of the photo, which really tends to "segregate" middle-class houses and historic mansions from the "blocks".

 

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Japan has high class to "low" class "public" housing. I would say most danchi tend to be for more working class people but that doesn't answer the thread at all since it says "areas"...you can have a poor danchi next to semi rich houses or expensive condominiums for example.
It is a different case with Japanese cities are there are no distinctive rich or poor areas.
 

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There is no distinctive division between poor and wealthy here in Izmir(Turkey). But there are less poverty in western and northwestern parts of the city. And you generally cannot tell who is rich or who is poor in Turkey, someone who looks like a homeless may turn out to be a millonaire and someone who looks quite wealthy may be poor as shit lol

This also applies to districts and neighborhoods. A rather shabby neighborhood may be quite rich and vice versa. Turks have a really different perception of wealth so it's hard to tell if a place is wealthy or poor.
 
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