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D & Y
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One way ticket to Mars—who on Earth wants to go?

In all likelihood, the first tickets to the Red Planet won’t come with the guarantee of a return trip.

For those on the maiden Mars voyage, it could mean goodbye forever to loved ones and the comforts of home.

Laughs aside, Reyno, who hails from Lower Sackville, N.S., admits his quest to propel the human race towards an interplanetary lifestyle would come with some major sacrifices.

But the 21-year-old remains determined, landing a spot among the final 1,000 candidates to be a part of the Mars One mission, which is being steered by a deep-pocketed entrepreneur and has a goal of settling on the planet’s surface in the year 2023.

Reyno is also in the early stages of launching a Canadian rocket company — Open Space — and has attracted hundreds of followers on social media to his Send Nova Scotia to Space campaign..



http://metronews.ca/features/missio...-way-ticket-to-mars-who-on-earth-wants-to-go/
 

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D & Y
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98,869 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·

An artist’s conception of the stationary NASA Mars lander known as InSight, set to launch in March 2016 with the goal of drilling into the interior of Mars to study the planet’s seismology and the amount of heat coming from its core.


Historically, more missions to Mars have failed than succeeded, but the success rate is climbing as technology improves and new missions build on the lessons of previous ones.

NASA has seen a string of recent successes, from the Spirit and Opportunity rovers in 2003, to the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2007, to the famous Curiosity rover that landed in 2012 and has been sending back high-definition imagery every since.

NASA’s next major mission, named InSight, is set to launch in March 2016 with the goal of landing a robotic drill on the Red Planet that will probe five metres into Martian soil.

http://metronews.ca/features/mission-to-mars/1016244/were-getting-better-at-going-to-mars/
 

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D & Y
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·



Peering into the coming decades, Glen Hiemstra has little doubt humans will one day walk on Mars.

“It’s a question of inevitability more than a question of feasibility,” the Seattle-based author, consultant, and founder of futurist.com told Metro. “We will eventually go there.”

While Hiemstra described the goal of the Mars One project to land settlers on the Red Planet in 2025 as “very ambitious,” he also believes the timeline isn’t all that far off.


In my opinion, optimistically, it’s the 2030s, not the 2020s,” he said. “Realistically, it’s probably the 2040s, 2050s before we’ve really assembled everything that we need.”

Len Rosen, the Toronto-based author of 21st Century Tech Blog, foresees a similar timeframe for humanity’s first footprints on Martian soil.

“The most optimistic people think in the 2030s – somewhere in that decade,” said the 65-year-old Rosen. “I’m hoping I’ll be alive to see it.”

Questions of how aside, both Rosen and Hiemstra had similar answers when asked the bigger question: Why should we go to Mars?

Neither thought it likely that, in the immediate future at least, humans would need another planet to escape some calamity on Earth. Rather, they said, it’s more a matter of satisfying our natural desire to explore.

http://metronews.ca/features/mission-to-mars/1016095/why-go-to-mars/#
 

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D & Y
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98,869 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Journey to Mars: Seven-month, non-stop flight



A depiction of how a spacecraft would go from Earth to Mars using a Hohmann transfer orbit.




The trip to Mars is a long one.

Next to Venus, the Red Planet is the second closest to Earth, but the direct distance from here to there is still measured in the tens of millions – sometimes hundreds of millions – of kilometres.

That’s because, as Earth and Mars each make their way around the sun, the distance between the two terrestrial planets varies widely. At its closest, Mars can be about 55 million kilometers away. At its furthest, it’s more than 400 million kilometers away.

Earth has the inside track around the sun, orbiting every 365 days, while the Mars year is longer – roughly 687 days. The difference between their orbital periods means that Earth “laps” Mars about once every 26 months.

These moments present an ideal launch window for spacecraft, although even then the journey is not a direct, A-to-B path.

A typical trip to Mars follows what’s called a “Hohmann transfer orbit,” in which a spacecraft leaves Earth on one side of the sun, slingshots around the sun, and meets up with Mars on the far side of the sun from where it began.

The entire journey spans hundreds of millions of kilometres and takes about seven months. This is the route that Mars One plans to use.

According to its ambitious schedule, the non-profit foundation aims to launch unmanned spacecraft carrying equipment and robots to the Red Planet in 2018, 2020, and 2022, and then send the first crew of human settlers – on a one-way trip – in 2024.

http://metronews.ca/features/missio...s-of-kms-on-a-slingshot-trip-around-the-sun/#
 

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L'amour du risque
Airbus A380
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10,006 Posts
7 months trip acctualy isn't a lot of time at all. I guess, 100 years ago we even could't imagine this. I guess it will pass more 100 and then we will be on the top of Mount Olympous. :cheers:
 
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