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Historian, photographer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A thread on UrbanPlanet proved popular, so I thought I'd get the guns running here. Input your own abandonment photography!

Mt. Sterling, Kentucky High School: Abandoned in the 1990s, I received permission to conduct interior photography of this historic structure. Unfortunately, the owner has no plans for the building, so it remains neglected and open to the elements. There are currently 16 photographs at Abandoned.

1. Auditorium


2. Auditorium: If you can't see it, there are people in the photo :)


3. Hallway: Much of the school is in disarray, as portrayed in this photograph.


4.


--

Mt. Sterling, Kentucky Baptist Church: Closed only a few years ago, the active congregation relocated to 'greener' pastures on the outskirts of the city. I will soon upload some photographs, including a rendering, to the site soon. There are currently 16 photographs at Abandoned.

5. Chapel


6. Offices


7.


8. Preaching: Jay is preaching to... no one! :)


Enjoy!
 

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Historian, photographer
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tennessee State Penitentiary

Located in the heart of a major city, the Tennessee State Penitentiary was closed to all prisoners due to its unsafe housing conditions and general lack of maintenance. Today, several film production companies utilize it, along with other smaller industrial businesses.

1. Administration building


Constructed of 800 single-occupancy cells in two cell-blocks, it also housed an administration building, offices, warehouses, and two factory structures. Outside of the prison walls was a working farm. Upon its opening in 1898, it housed 1,403 inmates, creating instant overcrowding issues.

2. "Chaos" in a cell block. This is five stories high.


Throughout the prison's life, it was the home of numerous staged mass escapes and riots, the last being in 1985. Mass overcrowding, inadequate facilities, poor ventilation, and "hellish" conditions earned it a class action lawsuit. The suit (Grubbs v. Bradley - 1983) stated that the Department of Correction was to never admit any new prisoner into the walls of that state prison due to its severe overcrowding, inadequate facilities, and non-existent ventilation.

3. Health clinic's isolation ward


In 1989, the Riverbend Maximum Security Institution opened its doors to house incoming inmates. The state prison, once hailed for its hellish and barren conditions, closed its doors in June of 1992.

4. Unknown building at the rear. It may have been a medical facility at one point (this prison housed the hospital for the entire state prison system), or a minimum security attachment. Some rooms were decorated in paint, while one had an elaborate "fireplace."


5. Power plant


6. Death row (that's not me)


I would like to thank the Tennessee Department of Corrections for showing us around the facilities and allowing us access to their buildings, and the Tennessee Film, Music and Entertainment Commission for helping coordinate the day-long trip! It was very much worth it. You can find many more photographs from this trip and prior trips at my entry on Abandoned!

Hope you enjoyed this photoset!
 

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Historian, photographer
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Army Ammunitions Plant (Part I)

Disclaimer: Do not even attempt to trespass or venture wayward into the sprawling facility. It is monitored 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by armed guards! We entered through the Army Corps. of Engineers, and the process was very laborous... but well worth it.

On July 1, we were allowed access into the Indiana Army Ammunitions Plant. Tours are not given, and general media are not allowed inside, since one government contractor still produces black powder on-site. It took nearly three years of calling and persistence, but it was well worth it! Over a span of five hours, we did a quick run-through of four buildings -- a power house, power plant, laboratory, and a sulfuric acid concentration house -- out of approximately 400 structures, and hundreds of igloos. Sprawling out over 10,000 acres, the complex housed a smokeless powder plant, a rocket-propellant plant, and a bag-manufacturing/loading facility. A rocket-propellant plant was never completed.

1. Igloo 4801. Hundreds of igloos, many of them still active, store black powder.


2. Igniter line area. These structures were extremely contaminated and were burned in 2006. Only six buildings could be burned on a given weekend and only if the wind conditions were favorable.


3. This was once the main shipping and receiving hub for the ordnance works.


4. Power Plant (Building 2541). This was a smaller power house for the shipping and receiving area.


5. Shipping house area. These World War II-era shipping carts feature full rubber wheels. This is to reduce sparks that may come from contact, especially when working around black powder.


6. A shipping house is visible in the distance.


Part II, covering the Propellant and Explosives district, will be forthcoming! Enjoy this photo set! As always, you can see hundreds more with a full, detailed history at my entry.
 

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Historian, photographer
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Disclaimer: Do not even attempt to trespass or venture wayward into the sprawling facility. It is monitored 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by armed guards! We entered through the Army Corps. of Engineers, and the process was very laborous... but well worth it. See more photographs and history at my entry.

Part II: Propellant and explosives area

7. These unmodified World War II-era flatcars are in excellent shape!


8. One power plant... we didn't enter this one.


9. Sprouting buildings up like weeds.


10. From the interior access roads, you really could not see much for the heavy vegetation. But from the roof of a power plant...


11. ^


12. The pump house is immediately visible.


13. Laboratory (Building 706-3). Although mostly empty, this fantastic building is akin to walking into a time portal. Vintage signs, equipment, and papers lay scattered about. The building itself is in excellent condition, given that it has been closed for nearly 40 years!


14. ^


15. Change House (Building 707-29). The triple X's indicate that black powder may be present -- on anything from clothes to shoes and even hair. The plant took the safety of the workers very seriously.


16. Sulfuric Acid Concentration House (Building 303-2). I have no idea on the purpose of this four-story building, but I'm pretty sure it involved sulfuric acid and wasn't too pleasant.


17. ^


18. ^


19. Pump House (Building 402-3). Cooling Tower Chlorinator...


20. ^


21. ^


22. Power Plant (Building 401-1). Chemox Gas Mask.


23. ^. Holy light.


24. ^.


25. ^. Cart.


26. ^. Going higher.


27. ^. At the top interior floor. Don't look down. I'm very much afraid of heights, and I was literally taking baby steps all around the upper floors!


28. ^. Peering up.


29. ^. Peering down at the top interior floor.


30. ^. I couldn't resist.


Pshew! You can see all the photographs from the propellant and explosives area here, and view hundreds of more photographs and history at the main article here. Comments/questions welcome. Enjoy!
 

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Civilization
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WONDERFUL THREAD IDEA! I'm afraid I don't have any abandoned building pics right now, but I'm sure I could find some or [take some] in the near future and post them on this thread.
 

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Artist
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The Bridger Building, on the left, has been abandoned for about a decade. Reportedly it replaced a classical building designed by Frederick de Longchamps, but I have not been able to find historical photos of that yet.


The Lady Luck hotel was gutted for renovation and then the developer promptly ran out of money and it has sat abandoned for the past couple years.


A fire at the Stardust hotel a few weeks before demolition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Bodie, California: Are the buildings being maintained? At Thurmond, West Virginia (pop. 7), the remaining structures are being saved but most are not in use. Exterior restorations, but interiors remain gutted or bare.... money issues.

Bridger Building: I can only imagine what the interior must look like. Great 1960s architecture right there! :p
 

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Bodie, California: Are the buildings being maintained?
No, they are being allowed to decay naturally and all the interiors are exactly as they were when the people left. But there are Park Rangers protecting the place from vandalism and stealing. It's 13 miles up a dirt road to get to it north of Mono Lake. In 1880 it had a population of 10,000 with 65 saloons. The population decline started in 1892 after the first major fire and the second major fire destroyed all but what is now left.

Bridger Building: I can only imagine what the interior must look like. Great 1960s architecture right there! :p
I haven't seen the inside, but there was a major aspestos removal project years ago and it's slated for demolition but they keep putting it off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Here are a bunch of randoms that I've uploaded to Abandoned over the past week. I've almost gone through my 2007 photograph collection, which means that I can start going through some 2006 directories! :)

1. Kentucky School for the Deaf: No real information here, just that some buildings are abandoned.


2. Exteriors at the Mt. Sterling High School in Kentucky.


3. Raccoon Furnace: Constructed in 1833 along what is today Kentucky Route 2, it closed in the late 1800s.


4. Along the road next to the Old Taylor Distillery.

 
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