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Theres no doubting that the increase in Go Zones would have boosted patronage overall, but the number of people losing their nearest route was quite high. Adelaide would have had the longest walk up distances to PT of any capital city.

The distances are not unreasonable.....I have walked that far myself to get home late night.

Bus Network (2)_LI.jpg


I have highlighted what I consider problem areas in terms of coverage.
 

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Mate, Im not arguing, for most people that’s a perfectly reasonable walk, however for the elderly, disabled, parents with young children etc you can’t really have much more than the orthodox 400m walk up distance which is used by most transit agencies, and bus networks do need to provide a social function as well as a mass transit function (As much as that interferes with pure efficiency)

If it were say a grid of go zones based around 800m walk distance, and then say secondary routes at 1 hour frequency then that probably would have been accepted more broadly.
 

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If it were say a grid of go zones based around 800m walk distance, and then say secondary routes at 1 hour frequency then that probably would have been accepted more broadly.
Not trying to start an argument, just offering a different viewpoint.
I think the proposed network would meet this criteria (apart from the 2 problem areas I have highlighted)

Unfortunately Adelaide is not a rich enough city (nor more importantly a dense enough city, it really is a low density sprawl, but Perth is as well you say, but WA is far richer than SA, and Perth would have a lower median age than Adelaide ie more families in those suburban homes) to have public transport available every 400 metres.

The proposed network really does reflect where Adelaide people go on public transport. When not going home they are going to "the shops/services centre" "the school/university" "the beach" and off course the CBD.

Adelaide is not really a "grid" city...its "radial" and the bus routes reflect that.

Even if Labor was still in power the northern suburbs bus routes were to re-organized after the electrification of the Gawler line so that duplicating services into the CBD were eliminated. And of course the same was expected down south with the opening of the Flinders Line.
 

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I think of it like this.

It was say, 500 stops closed.

A 10km route would have 25 stops roughly.

Thus we need 20 routes retained to maintain social coverage.

If those social coverage routes run hourly, its the equivalent of having say 5 fewer go zones in the plan.
 

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The whole "bus stop" argument is quite confusing because the only numbers quoted were the bus tops to close and never the new bus stops created on the new routes. For example 2 old routes were to be closed but a new route proposed between them creating new bus stops.

And also there was so little analysis in the Adelaide media about the actual changes ie do do you need a bus route mirroring any of the train lines.....how many people will be 800 metres or more from public transport? Just because there is no local bus route doesn't necessarily mean no public transport....

I fear the capitulation of SA Liberal government to nay-sayers has set back the cause of reform years...if not decades.
We may not even see something something as simple and needed as the renumbering happen now.

Peter Parker on his MelbourneOnTransit blog claims the reforms would increased the numbers of Adelaidians on a Go-Zone bus route from 500,000 to 700,000.
 

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International transport consultant Jarrett Walker (he has worked in Australia) has written a column with his response to Adelaide's failed bus network revamp.

 

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The whole "bus stop" argument is quite confusing because the only numbers quoted were the bus tops to close and never the new bus stops created on the new routes. For example 2 old routes were to be closed but a new route proposed between them creating new bus stops.
Umm Where did that happen?

It was basically just Go Zones on main roads (And to Adelaides credit, their main roads have stops anyway) so the new go zones were just routing onto them.

What happened is they did these go zones on main roads, but deleted the welfare routes that snaked mid block.
 

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Here's an overlay of the current network (grey) and the cancelled proposal (colour) so you can see where service was removed or rerouted.

adl old new.jpg
 

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And also I was thinking of posting on Sensational Adelaide as well....(and of course with you as author/creator)
 

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Tap and Go payments trial for Adelaide trams. App and credit cards as payments.
Unfortunately it is tram only so no transfers to train or buses.
And another validator to go inside vehicles separate to the current MteroCard/Metroticket validator.

Tap and pay on trams



Introducing more ways to tap and pay on Adelaide trams
Below you can find more information on:

An easy new way to pay
Don’t have a metroCARD or Seniors Card?
From late September 2020, you can tap and pay for your trip with your Visa, Mastercard or (enabled) smart device on all Adelaide Metro trams.
This convenient new option enables you to pay and validate your fare in one quick, easy, contactless transaction – without a lot of forward planning.
Available on Adelaide trams
We’re introducing this new tap-and-pay option on our trams first, as step one of a staged upgrade of our ticketing system. The upgrade will help us make public transport simpler, safer and easier to use and bring Adelaide up to date with other capital cities across the world.
The tram pilot starts in late September 2020.




How does it work?
Just tap/wave your Visa, Mastercard or (enabled) smart device on the new validator at the centre doors when you board your tram. When the validator screen confirms that the transaction was successful:
  • your account will be charged for one regular metroCARD fare (peak $3.84 or interpeak $2.11)
  • your credit/debit card will be your proof of purchase: if an inspector asks to see your ticket, you can provide the last four digits of your credit card as verification.
  • your fare will be valid for two hours (just like a regular MetroTicket). During this time you can transfer from tram to tram free of charge: just tap the same credit card again as you board your next tram. The system will recognise that you’ve already paid and will not charge you again.


Who is it for?
This new tap-and-pay option is ideal for people who:
  • don’t have a metroCARD or Seniors Card
  • don’t take the tram very often
  • would like try taking the tram but haven’t yet bought a metroCARD
  • might ordinarily buy a single regular MetroTicket
  • have a tap-and-pay-enabled Visa, Mastercard or smart device.
Remember, at this stage, the new tap-and-pay option:
  • is only available on trams: you won’t be able to transfer free of charge within two hours to other modes (buses or train) or access the Tea Tree Plaza Car Park
  • is cheaper than a regular MetroTicket, but doesn’t enable you to buy a concession fare.
If you already have a metroCARD, Seniors Card or a 14-Day or 28-Day Pass, you are best off continuing to use it – especially if you usually pay a concession fare.
To see which fare options offer you the best value, check our full range of Tickets & Fares or call the Adelaide Metro InfoLine on 1300 311 108 (7am to 8pm every day).
FAQS
What type of credit or debit cards can I use?

You can use your Visa or Mastercard credit or debit card regardless of which bank you bank with, as long as it has the tap-and-pay function.
At this stage we cannot accept American Express (AMEX). Our range of accepted cards may expand as we continue with our ticketing upgrade.
Can I use my mobile phone or wearable device to pay?
Yes. You can use any mobile or wearable device that is linked to your Visa or Mastercard account with a tap-and-pay app (eg, Apple Pay, Fitbit Pay, Google Pay or Samsung Pay etc).
What will I be charged?
Your account will be charged for one regular metroCARD fare (peak $3.84 or interpeak $2.11). This is considerably cheaper than a single regular MetroTicket (peak $5.70 or interpeak $3.80).
You will not be charged any banking fees for this transaction.
How do I prove I’ve paid for and validated my tram trip?
If an inspector asks to see your ticket, you will just need to provide the last four digits of your credit card. The inspector can verify your fare with that information. Your privacy is protected during this process: the inspector cannot see the rest of your credit card number, your name or any other personal details.
The payment will be listed in your bank statement.
Can I transfer to another public transport service within two hours, free of charge?
At this stage you can transfer, free of charge, from tram to tram within two hours of paying your fare. You will not be able to transfer to buses or trains because they do not yet have the new validators.
If you need to transfer from a tram to a bus or train, another fare option could offer better value. Explore our full range of Tickets & Fares or call the Adelaide Metro InfoLine 1300 311 108 (7am to 8pm every day).
Can I still use my metroCARD or Seniors Card?
Yes. This new tap-and-pay option doesn’t replace your metroCARD or Seniors Card: it’s just an additional way for people to pay and validate their fare. It will make catching the tram easier for people who don’t have a metroCARD, Seniors Card or a 14-Day or 28-Day Pass.
If you have a metroCARD, Seniors Card or a 14-Day or 28-Day Pass, ignore the new validator and just keep validating your trips the way you usually do.
Will this affect my metroCARD or Seniors Card balance?
No. This is a completely separate system.
Can I get a concession using this tap-and-pay option?
No. If you choose this tap-and-pay option, you will be charged the same amount as a regular metroCARD fare (peak $3.84 or interpeak $2.11).
If you are eligible for a concession, this is probably not the best option for you.
To see which fare options offer you the best value, check our full range of Tickets & Fares or call the Adelaide Metro InfoLine 1300 311 108 (7am to 8pm every day).
Which validator do I use now?
If you have a metroCARD, Seniors Card or MetroTicket, just continue to use our regular validators. These cards and tickets will not work on the new validator.
If you’d like to tap and pay with your Visa, Mastercard or (enabled) smart device, use the new validator, located at each tram’s centre doors. The new validator has a larger digital screen that displays your card validation results when you tap.
Where else is this system used?
People now have the option to use a credit/debit card to pay for public transport in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth and in a growing number of overseas cities including London, New York and Singapore.
Will my credit information be secure?
It will be completely secure, just like all other credit/debit card tap-and-pay systems.
Will I activate the validator by standing near it on a crowded tram?
No. This is no more likely to happen on the tram as it is in a shop or café.
However, if you believe you have been accidentally charged for a fare, you can contact us at the Adelaide Metro InfoLine 1300 311 108 (7am to 8pm every day) for prompt action.
What if I don’t have a credit/debit card?
If you don’t have a credit/debit card, there is a great range of other fare options available.
To see which fare options offer you the best value, check our full range of Tickets & Fares or call the Adelaide Metro InfoLine 1300 311 108 (7am to 8pm every day) for advice.
What should I do if I experience problems?
  1. Check you’re using the right validator. At this stage we have one new validator on each tram (at the centre doors). This is the only validator that can read your Visa, Mastercard or (enabled) smart device.
  2. Check whether there’s a problem with your Visa, Mastercard or smart device. Is it tap-and-pay enabled? Does it have the tap-and-pay symbol? Do you use it to tap and pay for other things (eg, in shops or restaurants)? Do you have enough money available in your account? You may wish to contact your bank and check.
  3. Contact us via the Adelaide Metro InfoLine 1300 311 108 (7am to 8pm every day) and let us know what happened. We are happy to help.
You’ll find more Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on our FAQs page.

 

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Keolis Downer has been chosen to run the Adelaide train network for the next 8 years.

From In Daily

Private operator wins $2b deal to run Adelaide trains

Adelaide’s metropolitan rail service will be run by a private operator from January, with the State Government paying Keolis Downer $2 billion to run the network for eight years.



Transport Minister Corey Wingard said this morning that Keolis Downer had come out on top after a “competitive tender process” to operate Adelaide’s passenger train services.
“Keolis Downer will operate Adelaide’s train services for an initial eight-year period under a performance-based $2.14 billion contract focused on delivering significant improvements to the customer experience,” he said.
“As part of the contract, Keolis Downer will implement a new customer experience strategy to enhance customer satisfaction.”

Full story : Private operator wins $2b deal to run Adelaide trains - InDaily
And from the Adelaide Metro website.

Keolis Downer awarded contract to operate and maintain Adelaide Metro train services
When: Friday 18 September 2020

Following a competitive tender process Keolis Downer Pty Ltd has signed on to operate the Adelaide Metropolitan Passenger Rail Network from the end of January 2021.
This new contract will improve services for all passengers, modernise the system and help to increase public transport patronage.
What does this mean for our customers?
This contract will start from the end of January 2021, however there will be no changes to any timetables at this time, with customers seeing a seamless transition.
The Department for Infrastructure and Transport (DIT) will retain ownership of all assets (trains, tracks and stations), and continue to control fare prices, revenue and standards for service levels.
What improvements will customers see?
Over the initial eight years of the contract, the Department and Keolis Downer will partner to deliver better, safer and more frequent train services.
This will include:
  • Faster and more services upon completion of the electrification of the Gawler rail line.
  • More services per year on the new Flinders Line, compared to the Tonsley Line, when it opens in late 2020 offering weekend services for residents, students and workers in the southern suburbs.
  • An extended trial of high security zones on platforms that includes CCTV, improved lighting and the installation of “help phones” to create a safer environment for travellers.
As part of the contract, Keolis Downer will implement a new customer experience strategy to enhance customer satisfaction.
The new system will also lead to the digitisation of work practices for Passenger Service Assistants meaning less time spent in the office doing paperwork and more time out with customers to get a better understanding of their needs.
Who are Keolis Downer?
From Melbourne to the Gold Coast and Newcastle, Keolis Downer is heavily focused on customer service and ensuring the journey for rail users is simple, easy and efficient.
Keolis Downer has an exceptional track record of running successful public transport systems across Australia and around the world.
They benefit from the rich capability of existing operations in Australia, and parent companies: heavy rail operation and maintenance experience of Keolis internationally in the UK, the US, Germany and the Netherlands, supported by the expertise of its majority shareholder SNCF (the national railway in France), and Downer’s expertise in rail infrastructure and rolling stock maintenance and asset management both locally in South Australia and nationally in Australia.  

 

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Adelaide Metro has released a draft Flinders line timetable inviting public feedback.
Flinders & Seaford proposed train timetable (PDF 1.8MB)

More services for the Adelaide passenger rail network
When: From Monday 12 October 2020 to Friday 30 October 2020
Affecting: TONS, SEAFRD
Residents, students and workers from Adelaide’s southern suburbs can look forward to extra services announced for the new Flinders train line.
The Flinders train line is an extension of the existing Tonsley line, which currently only operates on weekdays to a 20 minute frequency during peak times and 30 minutes at all other times until 7pm.


ell us what you think of the new Flinders train line timetable
The timetable proposed for the new Flinders train line extends services until late on weeknights and will provide a 20 minute frequency during peak times on weekdays and 30 minutes at all other times.
The new service will also run on weekends for the first time from early morning to late night.
Staff at Flinders Medical Centre have been catered for, with services to ensure arrival at the precinct by 7am, 7 days a week.
View the proposed Flinders & Seaford train timetable
Flinders & Seaford proposed train timetable (PDF 1.8MB)
The new Flinders train line will greatly improve public transport options for those living and working in the southern suburbs and will deliver better train services through investment in our public transport network.
Extended train services will help make the area more accessible and help connect employment, education, community resources, medical care and recreational opportunities.
The Flinders train line is expected to open for passengers in December.

To provide Flinders line timetable feedback

Consultation will be open until 5pm Friday 30 October.
The Flinders train line timetable will replace the Tonsley train timetable and will continue to appear with the Seaford train timetable.
The introduction of weekend services on the Flinders line will allow for Seaford services to run express to and from Woodlands Park to the city, providing a consistent 30 minute frequency and reducing travel times for Seaford services by approximately 5 minutes.
Passengers wishing to travel to Flinders from the Seaford line or the reverse will continue to be able to transfer at Woodlands Park station.
More details of the Flinders train line opening will be available on this website as the project progresses.

Flinders Link project details are available on the Department for Infrastructure and Transport website.


So the daytime frequency is 30 minutes (disappointing, hoping for 20 minutes, whilst nighttime is also 30 minutes) but perhaps the most unexpected thing is the duplication of services to the inner south stations from the city to Ascot Park.

These low patronage stations could easily be serviced by the Flinders trains enabling Seaford to become an express train all the time but no the Seaford trains will still stop there giving no patronage stations like Emerson a train every 10/15 minutes during the day and a 15 minute service at night!
 

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I don't like it, there are too many stopping patterns.

All stations to Seaford
All stations to Flinders
Seaford express Adelaide to Woodlands park.

Doesn't allow clockface departures to Seaford.

Should just be all stations to Flinders, and Seaford express Adelaide to Woodlands park, similar to the Thornlie/Armidale line in Perth.
 

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no patronage stations like Emerson
In most cities, any station that's located on the intersection of TWO major arterial roads (ie, South Rd & Cross Rd) would high patronage, being a significant interchange point between the train, and buses along both roads.

But no, this is Adelaide, where interchange between modes is not really a thing.
I mean, they don't even bother putting a tram stop above Goodwood Station, which would create a simple, yet effective interchange between the tram and THREE train lines.
 

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Dajan wrote
In most cities, any station that's located on the intersection of TWO major arterial roads (ie, South Rd & Cross Rd) would high patronage, being a significant interchange point between the train, and buses along both roads.
The intersection of South and Cross Roads and the Seaford train line may look like an ideal interchange on paper but the reality is quite different.......that intersection is a total mess, not grade separated so trains stop all the surface traffic.
There is a bridge over the South Road section but this was just a band aid approach to the whole intersection.

Do people swap modes there?......probably....but in low numbers.....trying to cross the intersection to the other main road or the Emerson train station is not a pleasant task nor will it be more enticing in the near future.....the train line needs to be grade separated el pronto due to the increase of trains with the Flinders line about to open.

The surrounding suburbia is low density, not much much chance of a tod there, rather it is likely to happen further south around the Edwardstown station.

I mean, they don't even bother putting a tram stop above Goodwood Station, which would create a simple, yet effective interchange between the tram and THREE train lines.
Same for the tram line over the Goodwood train station.....if you want to change modes then its a 7 minute walk from east or west and the numbers of mode-changers would be low, definitely not a priority for scarce Adelaide transport $$$$.
 
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