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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
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The Evening Chronicle - Monday November 2nd 1885.

This is a very important issue of the Evening Chronicle, as it is the VERY FIRST edition of the paper ever published. As can be seen, in those days the front page was all adverts (and quite small ones too, difficult to read) so there is no news on it to show what was happening in the world (or in our region) on that day.

To put this newspaper into context though, 1885 was the year that General Gordon was killed in Khartoum.

Now, I wish I owned a copy of this actual newspaper, but sadly I do not. The front page shown here is just a facsimile that I have, but interesting to see nonetheless . . .





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As can be seen, in those days the front page was all adverts (and quite small ones too, difficult to read) so there is no news on it to show what was happening in the world
Who needs news when there are adverts like those to read?

I'd be rushing straight out to buy a self-curative Magnetic Belt and order my hand-crafted Portmanteau and picking up a bottle of Invalid Port, before legging it to listen to "Dr. Ellis's Popular Lecture on the Ear and Throat".
Interesting to read that "Only Good Watches Are Cheap". It seems to be the same story as the dodgy email scams still offering cheap branded watches 125 years later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Who needs news when there are adverts like those to read?

I'd be rushing straight out to buy a self-curative Magnetic Belt and order my hand-crafted Portmanteau and picking up a bottle of Invalid Port, before legging it to listen to "Dr. Ellis's Popular Lecture on the Ear and Throat".
Interesting to read that "Only Good Watches Are Cheap". It seems to be the same story as the dodgy email scams still offering cheap branded watches 125 years later.

Yes, it is actually a very interesting front page!!

I have a lot of 'OLD ADVERTS, from around this region and beyond (as I'm sure others on here also do) and have been thinking that it could merit a possible new thread, to show some of them?

What do people think?
 

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An 'Old Advert' thread would be fascinating and I'd support this 100%.
Some of the claims made for old patent medicines and nostrums wold make your hair curl.
I'd be happy to contibute some of my favourites.

MAC
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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So, this is the "Old Adverts" thread, as promised, and I have incorporated the posts from another thread, that led to the creation of this one!

. . . and here are a few adverts from around the region, from 1959 . . .







 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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Excellent one Alf, much appreciated!

When we first got married, we bought our three piece suite from there. We couldn't afford it (it was an expensive shop) but we wanted to get at least one thing that would last a long time.

Needless to say, though it was a lovely suite, it didn't last all that long at all.

I didn't know it then (as my parents 3 piece suite, albeit recovered, had lasted them from 1940 to 1985 . . .) but 3 piece suites don't last too long these days.

We are now on our 4th one since we got married!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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It is a useful 'bonus' of us now having this thread about Old Adverts from the Region, that periodically (on our many other threads) an old advertiement may be used to illustrate a point - and so now we can accumulate them together in here at the end of the week, or whenever!

So, here are a few that have been used on the forum in the last seven days or so, W/C 6th Sept 2010 . . .


From the 'Retail Memories' thread, Post 12 on 11/09/10 . .



From the 'Osborne Garage' Project thread, Post 32 on 12/09/10 . .



From the 'Books about Newcastle & the NE' thread, Post 93 on 12/09/10 . .



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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
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For much of the last century, the most famous advert throughout North Eastern England on almost every BUS, was . . .

Shop at BINNS












and even back in the days of the TRAMS, it was the same . . .





Also, here are some other old Binns ADVERTS, for their Market Street (ex-Bainbridges) Department Store, from when they moved from the corner of Grey Street, to the Market Street/Grainger Street/Bigg Market store, in 1977 . . .















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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
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Old Adverts - with PRICES . .

I have had quite a few 'PMs' from people saying that they love the old adverts, but that what they would really like to see is old adverts with PRICES on them.

So, here are some of those.

They are all from the 'Journal & North Mail' dated 28th November 1952 . . .
















Just as a bit of help to some of you!!

6d = 2.5p
1/- = 5p
2/6 = 12.5p
5/- = 25p
10/- = 50p
15/- = 75p


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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
^^

Alf, I always advise people to check the 'Alphabetical Subject Index' thread, first.

That would always be your best bet.

If any facts about Woolco (at either Killingworth or Washington) had been reported on this forum, it would have been listed in the Alphabetical Index, under "W".

As I explain in the first post of that thread, it is actually more reliable than a search engine.

As it happens, we had not discussed Woolco at all (prior to today) on the Newcastle Forum (so you wouldn't have found it) though it had been discussed on the Sunderland Forum!

You will now find three links in the Index, to Woolco, including one to the below advert . . .



Evening Chronicle "Old Tyneside" Supplement - 1971.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
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I could hardly believe it!! I just opened up this weeks edition of the Evening Chronicle's 'Remember When' supplement (Issue 83, dated 18th September 2010) and when I looked inside - they are COPYING us!!

Well, maybe not . . . I'm sure it is simply a coincidence, that just after WE start off this "Old Adverts" thread there is an identically named article in this supplemement!

Actually, as I don't normally read the Remember When's, they may well have done this in the past, I'm not sure?

Anyway, out of interest though, here is their version of this thread . . .

 

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This one is from the Chronicle 1st. April 1964:

EveningChronicle01-04-1964 by alfred stone, on Flickr

I loved the Isaac Walton's ad for the shirts with three collars. It reminds of the times my mother used to take us to Bainbridges so she she buy my dad's shirt collars. I still have an old cigar box full of collar studs which belonged to my grandfather.
 

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I’ve always enjoyed the idea of shops being split into two with each bit selling totally different goods or services.

Until recently there was a bicycle shop / launderette in Alnwick and in Wooler there’s an opticians / wool shop!

Ponytons seems to have been an interesting place with a range of motor bikes, bicycles, prams, gramophones and radios!



Advert from:
Paul J Brown 'Canny Newcastle: Some Scattered Threads of a Romantic Story Collected and Tied in a Bunch’
Published by Bealls in 1929

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Another advert from 'Canny Newcastle: Some Scattered Threads of a Romantic Story Collected and Tied in a Bunch’

It’s a disturbing image to our eyes now, but, before the rise of National Socialism in Germany the swastika was a symbol of good luck – hence the ‘lucky cross’ name for the toffee.



Wikipedia gives a good summary of the history and more recent social impacts of the symbol.

“The word swastika is derived from the Sanskrit word svastika, meaning any lucky or auspicious object, and in particular a mark made on persons and things to denote good luck.”

“Following a brief surge of popularity in Western culture, the swastika from the 1930s became strongly associated with its iconic usage by Nazi Germany, and it has hence become stigmatized and to some extent taboo in the Western world; it has notably been outlawed in Germany if used as a symbol of Nazism.
Many modern political extremists and Neo-Nazi groups such as Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging and Russian National Unity use stylised swastikas or similar symbols.”
 
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