Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Aesthetics needed for Downtown Miami ?

What aesthetics would be appealiing for the Central Business District,Omni District and the Financial District? List them and where would you put them.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8 Posts
Aesthetico? isn't that like philosophy of art? i don't know too much about it to be qualified to speak about it with a proper stance. you have to have college degree to speak about these things.
 

·
Contents Under Pressure
Joined
·
9,623 Posts
Aesthetics merely means things you would find visually appealing...things like awnings, greenery, color choices, lighting, architectural features, etc.

No college degree required to comment on it.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
For me would be the paint job on some of the buildings. Man what were they thinking. Like the building behind the Dupont tower with those hideous squares protruding out on the side of the wall with that awful color. Blue and puke green. Miami really clashes their colors and picks really ugly colors.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
no more ugly metal sliding covers for when stores close at night. i would demand more depresion moderne art deco style buildings like the dupont

not evrey building needs to be built in the style of today.

rid the streets of horrible painting schemes such as that building that the downtown line of the metromover runs over thats black and white with red and orange stripes and blue cylindrical suport poles. it looks like ray charles came up with the plan. add new sidewalks with better landscaping. demolish ugly 70's and 60;s retail centers. demolish flager station --- an abomiatnio. upscale open air shopping cwnters would do
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
And I suppose you're willing to personally go hang the hurricane shutters for those stores by hand whenever one approaches? The reason why they use the ugly sliding metal covers is because they do double-duty as both hurricane protection and daily theft protection, and are designed to be immediately deployable by one person. The solution isn't to ban the shutters, it's to give the stores a reason to be open after dusk, and radically step up the police protection so store owners won't feel like closing them at night is their only viable option for keeping their store from getting broken into at night.

The sad fact is, a store in the CBD that leaves its doors and windows unprotected overnight will eventually get broken into, and the Miami police are too thinly-spread to do a damn thing to stop it. If you try to legislatively force stores to be vulnerable, they'll either close up and move to a better neighborhood, or start leaving big, mean dogs in their stores overnight that will eventually escape through a window broken by a thief and bite an innocent bystander. Until the police get crime under control, business owners in the CBD have to rely on their own resources to keep the criminals away. At the moment, closing and locking the store's hurricane shutters happens to be the most cost-effective way of achieving that goal.
 

·
Biscayne Corridor Realtor
Joined
·
930 Posts
hilarity

That second paragraph is hilarious, broken windows, rabid dogs and all. The store owners obviously share your pessimism but is there any proof the sky is falling? If no one dares to open late then nothing will change. All we can hope is young fearless people will buy those businesses and push those fearful dinosaurs out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
Rabid? No. Mean and ready to bite anything that moves? Yes. In Little Havana, it's common for auto repair shops and similar businesses to have big dogs walking around the site all night. If bars and shutters are banned, is it really that much of a leap to imagine someone stupidly breaking a store's window, running the moment they see the dog & escaping, but then having that dog try to climb out, get hurt by the broken glass, and -- while frightened and in pain -- attacking the first pedestrian unfortunate enough to walk by (or who tries to help the dog)? Remember, we're talking about small businesses. Big corporations like the Gap and Walgreens would never do it, because they fear lawsuits more than loss. Small businesses, on the other hand, tend to be run by people who take crime personally and will do whatever it takes to protect their store if the police can't or won't. The last time I checked, the overwhelming majority of businesses occupying the first floor of the buildings downtown are small businesses.

All the City can do is make the street pretty, light it up like a stadium, patrol it with lots of cops, encourage people to hang out there, and wait for Adam Smith's invisible hand to convince store owners that they can make more money by being open than by being closed. Anything it tries to do to limit shopkeepers' ability to protect themselves will backfire and leave it with block after block of abandoned stores with boarded-up windows. Restrictive laws ONLY work in areas that are already so desirable that people will put up with them to be there. Sorry to say, but the CBD today does not meet that description. If push came to shove, businesses would leave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Well talking downtown cbd alone, I would say more green landscaping, adding trees to sidewlks (not palm trees), but trees that provide shade.

remove every single metal sliding cover thing that is used when stores are closed.

Demolish every ugly two story lugage selling retail building on the flagler corridor and build 10 story traditional buildings.

if not demolish, at least paint everything exactly the opposite color of what it is now. I guarantee it will somehow look better.

also, pick up every homeless person, pimp, and prostitute within a mile radius of flager and drop them off in the middle of the ocean.Not only would things look prettier but i'd feel a whole lot safer
 

·
jimmy
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
^^

what is Camilus House?

^^
as for the homeless, my offer stands in Orlando as well for Miami... I'll drive the dump truck corner to corner and pick 'em up and ship 'em out... for a small fee, of course.
 

·
Savior of Gondor
Joined
·
1,505 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,670 Posts
Zyscovich Park West master plan:

http://www.miamitodaynews.com/news/070726/story6.shtml

Hotel, conference center in master plan for Park West

By Risa Polansky
A hotel and conference center could be in the cards for Park West should the City of Miami eventually adopt and implement the Downtown Development Authority and Zyscovich, Inc.'s proposed Downtown Master Plan, unveiled in its entirety last week.
Listed as a "strategic priority" in the plan is to "conduct a full feasibility study for a conference center and hotel in the Park West sub-district to increase the facilities available for business-oriented travel."
Park West, adjacent to downtown's central business district to the north, "is ideally located as a future expansion area for office and hotel development," the plan's executive summary states. "The area could accommodate construction of a new Miami Conference Center facility and conference hotel, tying the area west of Biscayne to the waterfront and park along a new public open space as well as providing street level retail, dining and entertainment uses compatible with a conference center."
The plan proposes using community redevelopment agency dollars to fund the projects.
"This is a great opportunity for CRA money," Commissioner Marc Sarnoff said. "If you don't create an engine in that part of the city, that part of the city will die."
Dana Nottingham, executive director of the development authority, referred to Park West as the "hole in the donut" of a rapidly developing downtown, but said it has the potential to "become a pretty signature address" should the plan be executed.
However, authority board member Neisen Kasdin said he has "great reservations about a conference center" in the Park West area.
While he supports more conference space downtown, as Miami Beach hotel prices often prove cost prohibitive for businesses looking to hold conferences there, he said, a new conference center should be more accessible to existing downtown hotels.
To succeed, a hotel in Park West would need to have at least 1,000 rooms, he said.
Mr. Kasdin represents Hyatt Equities in its dealings with the City of Miami to renovate the Hyatt Downtown at the Knight Center to include more conference space.
But the plan shows Park West as a prime area for development, as it is surrounded by Government Center, the nightclub district and the attractions on Biscayne Boulevard.
New large hotels and conference centers have proven successful in areas of Denver and Phoenix, Mr. Kasdin conceded, but were built with the support of hundreds of millions of public dollars, he said.
The potential use of community redevelopment dollars is key here, said plann$ing consultant Bernard Zyscovich.
Taxes on properties in a redevelopment agency's district are capped, and as property values rise, the increment above the cap is collected to fund the agency, which in turn makes improvements to the needy area.
"CRA money can pay for it, which doesn't happen in downtown," Mr. Zyscovich said. "It's a legitimate use of CRA dollars."
Commissioner Sarnoff agreed, saying the project could "provide employment in an area that is absolutely blighted."
He charged authority board members to "start thinking a little bit westward ho" in terms of economic development.
Plans for Park West also call for high-density residential and office development, as well as utilizing existing railroad alignment to create a park.

Redeveloping properties adjacent to the FEC right of way would create an urban park mall including open space, shaded areas and fountains, adding up to 4.4 acres of green space to the city, the plan shows.
The idea is to create a mixed-use urban neighborhood.
Other highlights of the downtown master plan — designed to enhance both the physical and economic landscapes of downtown — include reducing traffic, offering more access to the waterfront, increasing parkland and attracting new businesses.
It calls for a narrowing of Biscayne Boulevard and redevelopment of the Interstate 95 Dupont Plaza ramp among other projects.
In an address to the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce's New World Center Committee last week, Miami Mayor Manny Diaz said many downtown revitalization plans are too expansive, try to cover too much area and anticipate too many projects.
He would prefer first, he said, a redesign of Northeast First Street, Flagler Street and Southeast First Street.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,553 Posts
Sounds good, but I know not everything can be done at once. I agree with Manny Diaz, these are all really great projects, and I really hope they can be done ASAP, but I really think that the NE 1st-3rd St, Flagler and SE 1-2nd St are more important. They have the most traffic and the quicker improvements. I'd also say that to revamp downtown would be quicker, cheaper and easier than to redevelop Park West. Regardless, I'm glad the city's working on it and I hope they really get things going in downtown!
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top