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I agree on the inequality, Ive always been doubtful about Nigerians GINI not being particularly bad. I think if there were accurate stats it would reveal it to be one of the most unequal countries in Africa.
 

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Mozambican government approves construction of new coal-fired power plant in Tete province


The Mozambican government has approved the terms and conditions for construction of a coal-fired power plant in Tete, Mozambique, the Minister for Energy said Tuesday in Maputo at the end of a meeting of the Council of Ministers.

Salvador Namburete also said that the power plant would be built and managed by Acwa Power Moatize Termoeléctrica, a company in which state power company Electricidade de Moçambique (EdM) has a 5 percent stake, and Mozambican group Whatana Investimento owns 8 percent. The remaining capital is owned by a consortium made up of the Mozambican subsidiary of Brazilian group Vale, by EdM and a Japanese company.

The plant will be built in two stages, the first of which will produce 300 megawatts of power for consumption in Mozambique, of which 200 to 250 megawatts will be set aside for Vale and 50 to 100 megawatts for the national power grid, via EdM.

According to the minister, the concession contract has a lifetime of 25 years and the project is expected to create 1,200 jobs in the construction phase and 120 jobs when the plant goes online.
 

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Just for you ekema. You can't even blame me, this is from a Nigerian website:

A United Kingdom based international affairs magazine, ‘The World Today’ published by Chatham House in London has said though the planned re-calculation of Nigeria’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) will increase the size of economy from about $290 billion to about$400 billion,it will reveal an even deeper problem of income inequality.

Countries typically ‘rebase’ their GDP statistics every five years, using new information from household and other surveys to shed light on neglected or under-reported sectors that contribute to economic activity.
In Nigeria’s case, GDP statistics have not been rebased since 1990. Therefore, for months, statisticians have been working to re-calculate Nigeria’s gross domestic product, an exercise which is likely to dramatically increase the size of the country’s economy.

In a well-researched article entitled “Nigeria’s economy is about to achieve global status,” Razia Khan, Head of Africa Research at Standard Chartered Bank, London, submitted that the impact of dramatic growth in telecoms, banking and the Nollywood film industry might have been downplayed, thereby highlighting the need for the exercise. She thinks that growth in Nigeria needs to be made meaningful and prosperity needs to be shared more evenly, as there are high expectations that the year 2014 will go down as a milestone in Nigeria’s history, the moment the economy achieves global scale.

However, the article published over the weekend believes that in highlighting even greater inequality, GDP rebasing may reveal why so many Nigerians feel poor, and the attendant risk to political stability.

The publication observed that an average growth of seven per cent was the kind of growth it took an economy to double in size every ten years, but survey evidence suggested that Nigerian poverty, despite this growth, “whether measured in relative, absolute or even subjective terms, has increased.”

It quoted the National Bureau of Statistics data, which explains that subjective poverty categorised as the number of survey respondents identifying themselves as poor, increased to 93.9 per cent nationally in 2010, from 75.5 per cent in 2004.

The rebasing of GDP, it said, was unlikely to change this, adding that the fact that Nigeria’s middle class was growing was not refuted by these statistics.
According to Chatham House,though important gains had been made,it was most likely only within certain pockets of the economy, stressing that the challenge for Nigeria, both pre and post-rebasing, was to ensure that conditions that supported economic transformation, not just headline growth, were in place. “Transparency and fiscal accountability will need to be enhanced, and greater investment – more long-term, and in employment-generating sectors – remains a key requirement.

But as the country moves closer to elections next year, caught up in the hype of being a MINT, with the rebasing of GDP, just one event in a rushed political timetable, the risk is Nigeria will miss an opportunity to take stock and look more closely at the deeper messages behind the headlines,” the publication stated.

It regretted that despite the shift to more accountable forms of governance after 1999, little progress had been made in mobilising significantly more non-oil revenue – at least as measured against GDP.
Worse still, it emphasised that, despite significantly weak infrastructure, which would require years of public and private sector investment to remedy, Nigeria had accumulated little long-term oil savings.
Old article. It's actually from a lady part i dont know to South Africa. She's from Botswana. The Nigerian site merely reposted it. She works for standard bank and tends to take a bullish view when it comes to nigeria v South Africa. Like you.

Plus her opinions are not supported by the facts. Let's wait and see what the rebasing shows.
 

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I agree on the inequality, Ive always been doubtful about Nigerians GINI not being particularly bad. I think if there were accurate stats it would reveal it to be one of the most unequal countries in Africa.
Let's wait till the figures come out. Razia khan from standard bank usually writes stuff like that. Every time nigeria surpasses SA in some metric she has to come with a litany of excuses why it isn't exactly as it seems. She even implies ghanas rebasing 'found' a 60% increase in the economy. As though it's not been verified by every international organization.

But anyway as I've always stated the rebasing speaks to one thing. And that's the nigeria economy is the largest on the continent. Those that try to make it more than that do so to take away from that singular fact. It doesn't claim to be an improved gini or hdi. It's gdp size.
 

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Shale Gas Could Be Game Changer For South Africa, Says President Zuma

CAPE TOWN, Feb 14 (BERNAMA-NNN-SA NEWS) -- Shale gas exploration in South Africa's Karoo basin can be a game changer for the region, as well as for the South African economy, says President Jacob Zuma.

"The development of petroleum, especially shale gas, will be a game changer for the Karoo region and the South African economy," President Zuma in his sixth State of the Nation Address to joint session of Parliament here Thursday.

"Having evaluated the risks and opportunities, the final regulations will be released soon and will be followed by the processing and granting of licences."

Speaking at the Mining Indaba (conference) earlier this month, Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu announced that the country will soon start fracking (a method of gas extraction) in the Karoo. Her department has published the technical regulations for the development of shale gas for public comment.

Zuma said that construction of new power stations, namely Medupi in Limpopo Province and Kusile in Mpumalanga Province, as well as Ingula near Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal Province, was continuing. "We continue to explore other sources of energy, in line with the Integrated Resource Plan for Energy," said the President.

The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP 2010), which is administered by the Department of Energy (DoE), is a 20-year projection on electricity supply and demand. The government is looking at the various aspects involved in the rolling out of nuclear energy, says the DoE.

South Africa's nuclear energy policy was approved in 2008 and is further enhanced by the approval of the IRP 2010, which stipulates that nuclear will form part of the country's energy mix to a level of 9,600 megawatts (MW).
 

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Another chart showing the dramatic failure of the Zimbabwean economy. Cameroon has also done pretty terribly over the last few decades. Angola on the other hand :)

THE president of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, celebrates his 90th birthday on February 21st. He has led the country for 33 years—far longer than the average Zimbabwean has been alive. Yet his tenure is just the third-longest in Africa; Teodoro Obiang Nguema of Equatorial Guinea and José Eduardo dos Santos of Angola both beat him by a year. Only Mr Mugabe, however, has presided over declines in both economic output and life expectancy over such a long period. Since assuming power in 1980, GDP per person has decreased at an average of 1.2% per year. Life expectancy has dropped by three years. Mr Obiang Nguema is no better as a leader, but was fortunate enough to preside over an oil discovery in 1996, which boosted GDP per person to $14,000. This is the highest in Africa, albeit concentrated in scandalously few hands. No such luck for Zimbabweans. Mr Mugabe’s grip on power remains strong after his Zanu-PF party won by a sturdy 61% in last year’s elections—which were blatantly rigged.

STILL quoting the economist. :lol:
 

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Let's wait till the figures come out. Razia khan from standard bank usually writes stuff like that. Every time nigeria surpasses SA in some metric she has to come with a litany of excuses why it isn't exactly as it seems. She even implies ghanas rebasing 'found' a 60% increase in the economy. As though it's not been verified by every international organization.

But anyway as I've always stated the rebasing speaks to one thing. And that's the nigeria economy is the largest on the continent. Those that try to make it more than that do so to take away from that singular fact. It doesn't claim to be an improved gini or hdi. It's gdp size.
Yes we know, but would certainly be interesting to see the GINI. I never believed that Nigeria had a similar level of inequality to Ghana which its GINI shows. The poor arent any richer than in Ghana and the rich are a lot richer than the richest Ghanaians so it didnt add up. A lot of the stats that come out of Africa are guesswork but I suspect the true inequality in Nigeria to be close to the top on the continent. If I remember correctly, Anglola doesnt have a very bad GINI either.

Why do they keep on delaying the release of the rebase?

It will be interesting to see how this reflects in the HDI, other countries need to follow suit.
 

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Yes we know, but would certainly be interesting to see the GINI. I never believed that Nigeria had a similar level of inequality to Ghana which its GINI shows. The poor arent any richer than in Ghana and the rich are a lot richer than the richest Ghanaians so it didnt add up. A lot of the stats that come out of Africa are guesswork but I suspect the true inequality in Nigeria to be close to the top on the continent. If I remember correctly, Anglola doesnt have a very bad GINI either.

Why do they keep on delaying the release of the rebase?

It will be interesting to see how this reflects in the HDI, other countries need to follow suit.
It's being delayed, I think, bc it's ab election year. It'll be released when it can make the most impact. That's my guess.

You may be right about the gini. The way the rich fling money around where many can't feed suggests a huge disparity. But the poor in nigeria may be richer than ghana
 

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It's being delayed, I think, bc it's ab election year. It'll be released when it can make the most impact. That's my guess.

You may be right about the gini. The way the rich fling money around where many can't feed suggests a huge disparity. But the poor in nigeria may be richer than ghana
Well we already know Nigeria has a much higher rate of poverty than Ghana.

I would like to see how they calculate the GINI. How can Nigeria have a higher rate of poverty than Ghana and have far richer people rich people yet the GINI is roughly the same if i remember correctly
 

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i also dont believe ghana has just 3% below he poverty line. the number dont seem accurate. i dont know the percentage of rich people in nigeria. the absolute numbers dont tell the whole story
 

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Mozambique and South Africa join forces to attract investment​


February 21st, 2014 News​

Exploring business opportunities in Mozambique is the aim of a document signed in Maputo Thursday by Mozambican state holding company Instituto de Gestão das Participações do Estado (Igepe) and South Africa’s Investment Corporation (PIC), Igepe said in a statement.

PIC is Africa’s largest fund manager with a portfolio of around US$140 billion.

The ceremony to sign the document was attended by SacOil Holdings Limited, a private group listed on the South African and London stock exchanges that has vast oil assets in several African countries.

Igepe’s statement also said that an agreement was reached to create working teams to look into several opportunities discussed at the meeting between the two companies in more detail.
 

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What gives you the confidence that that's case? The poor in Nigeria has more food, has a durable materials house with electricity, indoor plumbing and the one in Ghana has neither?
It wasn't a declaration. I said may. I just don't believe ghana had only 3% below poverty
 

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It wasn't a declaration. I said may. I just don't believe ghana had only 3% below poverty
2 african countries that i always take figures from them with a pinch of salt:
Ghana and Rwanda.
 

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Africa should end poor farmer narrative, says agribusiness boss

The world is increasingly looking to Africa to meet growing global food requirements. Foreign investment in the agricultural industry is growing in countries like Ethiopia, which are deemed to have high potential.

A 2013 World Bank report titled Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusiness states the continent has the potential to create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030. “I think agriculture is definitely one of the biggest growth areas for Africa,” says Mucai Kunyiha, managing director of leading Kenya-based animal health company Cooper K-Brands.
Kunyiha says Africa has huge tracts of arable land, water and technology. What lacks, and is partly to blame for food insecurity in parts of the continent, is the right application of technology, the work ethic and vision to fully maximise the potential.

Africa could feed the world

Although some parts of Africa, Kenya included, are currently battling hunger and starvation, Kunyiha notes that Africa has the right ingredients needed to “feed other parts of the world, let alone feeding ourselves”.
“With better management Africa will be a global leader in food production. It is very possible,” he says. “If we look at Europe and other parts of Asia, the land is used to the maximum. Most of the new land available for agriculture globally is in Africa. This is the place it is going to happen. So it is about us knowing that demand and positioning ourselves.”
Originally from the UK, Cooper K-Brands started doing business in Kenya in 1906, targeting colonial farmers. The ownership of the company was transferred to local investors in 1990.
Cooper manufacturers a wide range of products including vaccines and supplements for livestock and poultry and fungicides, fertilisers, herbicides and insecticides for crops.
“Our customers are mostly commercially minded farmers because they understand the input compared with the output.”
Kunyiha attributes the company’s more than 100 years of success to innovation, strong brands, farmer connections built over decades and commitment by the firm’s leadership.
“Our corporate goal is enabling Africa to be a global leader in food production.”
Kunyiha reckons that Africa can easily multiply its production if famers adopt better agricultural practices, governments adopt better policies and infrastructure is improved to open up potential areas for farming.
“We can double, even quadruple our production.”

An end to the poor farmer narrative

Governments, and society in general, should also stop viewing farmers as “poor people”. Kunyiha argues that the tag ‘poor farmer’ has become a “permanent stamp” and it affects how governments and other stakeholders relate to African farmers.
“That thing of looking at farmers as poor people has killed a lot of agricultural development in Africa. As long you are seen to be poor, you are not seen as a participant. If you view farmers as poor, we will always think of what we can give them and not what they can produce,” says Kunyiha. “I think there is a lot of opportunity and there are so many farmers doing very well.”
Kunyiha cites the case of a young man he met recently who quit his job distributing bread in Nairobi for KSh. 200 (US$2) a day, relocated to his semi-arid rural home in eastern Kenya, and started farming.
“In the last season of tomatoes he made KSh. 2m ($23,200),” says Kunyiha. “When it rains he collects water and stores it. He has adopted an irrigation system that does not waste water. He also keeps cows for the dung that he uses as fertiliser. It was amazing looking at what he is doing in a very, very dry area.”

Identifying new opportunities

Although it built its name in animal-related products, Cooper recently diversified into the crop market. “We have built a unique distribution system across the country. We have got 13 distribution points serving about 5,000 shops of which about 80% are agrovets and therefore sell veterinary products and agrochemicals. So we decided to leverage on the distribution system. Crop was definitely a nice fit… and we are trying to grow the crop portfolio.”
Kunyiha reckons poultry is “a growth market” in Kenya citing the expanding middle class and popularity of chips and chicken outlets.
“There is growing demand for chicken,” he says. “The population is growing… and it is urbanising. One thing with urban people is that they have more cash. In Kenya it is not fish and chips [that is popular], it is mostly chips and chicken.” He notes that Cooper K-Brands sees the poultry business as “a big opportunity going forward”. The company is focusing on producing vaccine and nutrition products that will help farmers manage diseases and ensure that their poultry attains the standard 1.2kgs in 36 days as opposed to 42 days as is common in Kenya. “Here you find people losing 10%-20% of their flock and that is expensive. You can’t afford to do that. The main things are hygiene and nutrition.”

Overcoming hurdles

One of the challenges Cooper K-Brands faces is dealing with multiple levies charged by Kenya’s 47 counties. Devolution kicked off in Kenya last year, creating 47 counties which have powers to impose taxes.
“When our truck goes to Mombasa (on the Kenyan coast) we have to pay four counties. We have a truck that is branded so we have to pay the counties for advertising. These charges are so many. Some counties even charge you for entry.” Kunyiha adds that as most of Kenya’s polytechnics transform into universities, the pool of people with technical skills – who are badly needed in the industry – is shrinking. Accessing well trained and experienced personnel to support its regional business is also a challenge.
“We are trying to grow in Africa and we have opened up in Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania. We need human resource to work there. It has been a bit of a challenge to do work in those countries.”

Growing with the market

He explains that “Kenya is a bit sophisticated in the dairy industry” in terms of market development and the chain of distribution. However, in neighbouring countries, the market is not yet fully commercialised.
“The [founders of Cooper] who came here in 1906 did not come because milk production was high. They came and grew with the market. So our approach is to grow with those markets as urbanisation increases, the middle class continues to grow and demand for food goes up.”
Cooper K-Brands is keen to expand into Ethiopia where it sees great potential. However, Kunyiha is worried about the language barrier, the different culture and government control in some industries.
“Ethiopia has 80m people and is one of the fastest growing economies in the region. They have the largest livestock population in Africa although the productivity is not that good. So there is a lot of opportunity. However, having said that, Ethiopia is a huge mountain to climb unlike other East African countries.”
How we made it in Africa
 

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Moz, Zambia and Angola. :cheers:


Angola and Mozambique are due soon to be linked by rail following a recent announcement by Zambia of the start of a large rail project, Angolan newspaper Jornal de Angola reported.

The report, which made the newspaper’s front page, noted that Zambia would start building a railroad to link Chingola, in the former copper province, to the Angolan border where it will join up with the Benguela railroad.

“The railway will be built by a partnership between South African group Grindrod and Zambia’s Northwest Rail Company and involves two phases – the first between Chingola and the mines of Kansanshi, Lumwana and Kalumbila, covering 290 kilometres and a second stage that will link the Benguela railroad on the Zambian border with Angola near Jimbe,” Jornal de Angola reported.

The newspaper said that when the project was finished, southern Africa would have a railway line linking the Atlantic Ocean (Angola) to the Indian Ocean (Mozambique).

The aim is to open up a direct corridor as far as Lobito to allow land-locked Zambia to import products such as oil directly from Angola.

On the Angolan side the train has reached as far as Luau, on the border with the democratic Republic of Congo, since December 2013.
 

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February 24th, 2014 News​
The governments of Mozambique and Cabo Verde (Cape Verde) Friday in Maputo signed an agreement exempting citizens from both countries holding standard passports from visa requirements, the Mozambican press reported.

Mozambique’s Foreign Affairs and Cooperation Ministry said in a statement that the agreement was intended “to exempt citizens of both countries who hold standard passports from presenting an entry visa to enter the territory of each country,” and that the measure is “applicable to citizens that travel to each of the countries as tourists, for a visit and on business.”

At the same ceremony at the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Oldemiro Balói and the Cabo Verde Foreign Affairs Minister, Jorge Alberto da Silva Borges, also signed an agreement between Mozambique and Cabo Verde on political and diplomatic consultations.

The Cape Verdean Foreign Relations Minister travelled to Mozambique to take part in the 12th Extraordinary Council of Ministers of the Community of Portuguese-speaking Countries, held in Maputo on 20 February.
 
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