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Netcare results solid on private SA demand, more NHS cases in UK
Nov 23 2015 14:43 Carin Smith

Cape Town - Netcare Group's results for the financial year ending September 30 2015 reflect a solid performance from operations in South Africa, despite a more difficult economic environment, as well as a strong improvement from BMI Healthcare in the United Kingdom, Netcare Group [JSE:NTC] CEO Dr Richard Friedland, said on Monday.

Group revenue rose by 6.1% to R33 711m, group earnings (before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation) grew by 13.1% to R4 981m and operating profit improved by 14.6% to R3 728m. Profit before tax increased by 16.5% to R3 375m, profit after tax rose 16.4% to R2 439m and adjusted headline earnings per share grew by 12.6% to 189.0 cents.

The final dividend per share increased 12.5% to 54.0 cents.

SA operations performed well, according to Friedland, mainly due to improved operational leverage coming from strict cost management and efficiency initiatives. SA revenue increased 6.2% to R17 289m, Ebitda (Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) grew 9.8% to R3 948m, Ebitda margin improved by 70 basis points to 22.8%, operating profit rose by 9.7% to R3 411m and SA adjusted headline earnings per share (Heps) increased by 13.0% to 182.9 cents.
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Read more at http://www.fin24.com/Companies/Health/netcare-results-solid-on-private-sa-demand-more-nhs-cases-in-uk-20151123


Netcare (Network Healthcare Holdings Limited) is a South African health care company. It is the largest provider of private healthcare (after LIFE Healthcare, formally known as Afrox Healthcare and Mediclinic International) in both South Africa and at one stage in the United Kingdom. It acquired a controlling stake in the UK's General Healthcare Group in 2006, and also provided services to the National Health Service via its subsidiary Netcare UK. Their current chairman is S. J. Vilakazi
 

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HIV treatment programme saves 1.3-million lives

South Africa’s HIV treatment programme has saved 1.3-million lives over the past two decades, according to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and Aids’ (UNAids) latest Aids report that was released on Tuesday. South Africa has the largest number of people – 3.2-million – on antiretroviral treatment in the world.

But the report warns that although the country’s HIV treatment coverage has nearly doubled from 25% of HIV-infected people in 201, to 45% in 2014, South Africa would have to substantially increase its treatment coverage in the next five years to reach UNAids’ target of getting 90% of all HIV-infected people on treatment by 2020.

UNAids launched its 90-90-90 targets – which have to be reached by 2020 – last year, in an effort to end the Aids epidemic by 2030. The targets include having 90% of people living with HIV knowing their status, 90% of HIV-positive people on treatment and 90% of people on treatment with a suppressed viral load (viral loads low enough for HIV-positive people’s immune systems to remain strong and for them to stop being infectious).

According to the report, life expectancy in South Africa has increased from 52 years in 2004 to 61 years in 2014, and infant mortality dropped from 58 to 29 deaths per 1000 live births between 2002 and 2014. Experts have attributed these successes largely to the availability of antiretroviral drugs.

South Africa, however, still has the largest HIV epidemic in the world with 6.8-million people infected with the virus. The country had 330 000 new HIV infections in 2014 among people of 15 years and older.

About 65% of South Africans have been tested for HIV. UNAids warned that the pace of the global response to HIV “is too slow”. “Ending the Aids epidemic will require extraordinary efforts in leadership, investment and focus over the next five years to deliver even more services and even greater social change,” The UNAids report said.

According to UNAids the gains made with access to treatment, and people living longer as a result thereof, present new challenges. “Because of the life-saving benefits of treatment, the total number of people living with HIV is rising, which underscores the need for more effective prevention efforts.”

Other global findings
As of June 2015, 15.8 million people living with HIV were accessing antiretroviral therapy, up from 13.6 million in June 2014.

New HIV infections have fallen by 35% since 2000. New HIV infections among children have declined by 58% since 2000. Aids-related deaths have fallen by 42% since the peak in 2004. Forty-four low and middle-income countries looked to international donors for 75% or more of their Aids financing needs. UNAids estimates that $31.9-billion will be required for the Aids response in 2020, with $29.3-billion required in 2030.

http://mg.co.za/article/2015-11-24-hiv-treatment-programme-saves-13-million-lives
 

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University College Hospital, Ibadan, USA varsities discover permanent cure for sickle cell anaemia

The University of Ibadan (UI), in partnership with two American universities, on Wednesday, announced the discovery of a permanent cure for the sickle cell disease.

The cure which was described as less risky and with a potential to help over 5 million Africans living with the disease, was the outcome of a research carried out by UI in alliance with medical experts at the University of Illinois and the University of Loyola, both in Chicago.

Nigeria and other African countries can now heave a sigh of relief as the University of Ibadan in partnership with the University of Illinois, Chicago, USA and University of Loyola, Chicago have discovered a permanent cure for the terminal disease.
The cure of the deadly disease, according to the Professor of Medicine, Victor Gordeuk, who is the Director, Sickle Cell Centre, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA and his colleagues, Prof. Damiano Rondelli, also from the same university and Prof. Bamidele Tayo, University of Loyola, Chicago this new treatment is done through bone marrow transplant and that it is less risky.
This was revealed yesterday at the University College Hospital, Ibadan after a three-day brainstorming session with other experts in the teaching hospital.
Unlike the other conventional method of stem cell transplant which exposes patients to radiation which could cause cancer, first blood and marrow stem cell transplant, BMT, is much more effective.

The experts who were flanked by the Chief Medical Director, UCH, Prof. Temitope Alonge, Dr. Titilola Akingbola, an haematologist and Dr. Foluke Fasola, said this stem cell transplant is a standard procedure for the treatment of many blood cancers in both adult and children.

He said: “With this chemotherapy-free transplant, we are curing adults with sickle cell disease, and we see that their quality of life improves fast within just one month of the transplant.

“About 90 per cent of the approximately 450 patients who have received stem cell transplants for sickle cell disease have been children. Chemotherapy has been considered too risky for adult patients, who are often more weakened than children by the disease.

“Adults with sickle cell disease can now be cured without chemotherapy — the main barrier that has stood in the way for them for so long. Our data provide more support that this therapy is safe and effective and prevents patients from living shortened lives, condemned to pain and progressive complications.”

“In the new procedure, patients receive immuno-suppressive drugs just before the transplant, along with a very low dose of total body irradiation, a treatment much less harsh and with fewer potentially serious side effects than chemotherapy.”

“ Donor cells from a healthy and tissue-matched sibling are transfused into the patient. Stem cells from the donor produce healthy new blood cells in the patient, eventually in sufficient quantity to eliminate symptoms. In many cases, sickle cells can no longer be detected. Patients must continue to take immunosuppressant drugs for at least a year.

The CMD, Prof. Alonge who called for support from government, philanthropists, donour agencies and corporate bodies like banks and Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation for provision of equipment and completion of the sickle cell centre, described sickle cell as a disease of bone crisis which the patient suffers from head to toe.

He added that Sickle Cell Disease is a genetic disorder due to the presence of an abnormal form of haemoglobin in the red blood cells, called haemoglobin S (Hb S) instead of haemoglobin A (Hb A). Haemoglobin in the red blood cell is responsible for the transportation of oxygen in the body.
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ALGIERS South African Labour Minister expressing his desire to work towards its implementation in their country.


ALGIERS South African Labour Minister Mildred Oliphant, hailed Tuesday in Algiers, the social security system in Algeria she described as "efficient" expressing his desire to work towards its implementation in their country.

Speaking at the end of a working visit to the wilaya of Algiers with the Minister of Labour, Employment and Social Security, Mohamed El Ghazi, Ms. Mildred Oliphant reported that "a group of 'South African experts will be dispatched to Algeria to consider the social security management arrangements in order to enjoy his country from this experience. "

The South African Minister visited the personalization center of CHIFA card, the project of the Graduate School of Social Security, the center Audio-prosthesis of the National Office of equipment and accessories for Disabled (NOEAHP), to the central manufacturing caps and ear hearing aid shells and the Labour Inspectorate of the wilaya of Algiers.

After the visit, it was agreed during the talks between the two parties of the establishment of a joint working commission consisting of Algerian and South African officials to discuss ways of strengthening partnership and cooperation between NOEAHP and his South African counterpart, officials said sources at the Ministry of Labour.

For his part, Mr. El Ghazi told the press that an agreement "important" would be reached between labor ministries of the two countries regarding the "exchange of experience in the manufacture and maintenance of orthopedic devices for disabled people".

After the visit by Mrs Oliphant and the delegation accompanying him at the center of Audio-Prostheses under the NOEAHP, where she inquired about the operation of manufacturing and maintenance of prosthetic arms and legs and orthopedic pins, she expressed a desire to build on the Algerian experience in this field, through the sending of South African experts to benefit from training in the field.

Ms. Oliphant then visited the center for manufacturing caps and shells ear hearing aids Bach Djerrah and visited its various departments where the center's engineers were working to assembly and manufacturing hearing hulls.

The Minister of Labour of the Republic of South Africa on Monday began a three-day visit to Algeria at the head of a large delegation at the invitation of Mr. Mohamed El Ghazi, Minister of Labour, Employment and social security.

The visit comes within the framework of the implementation of the recommendations of the 6th session of the Algerian-South African High Joint Commission held in Algiers from April 16 to 19, 2015.
 

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Ebola epidemic officially declared over

The world breathed a sigh of relief on Thursday as a two-year Ebola epidemic that killed 11,000 people and triggered a global health alert was declared over, with Liberia the last country to get the all-clear.

The deadliest outbreak in the history of the feared tropical virus wrecked the economies and health systems of the three worst-hit west African nations after it emerged in southern Guinea in December 2013. At its peak, it devastated Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with bodies piling up in the streets and overwhelmed hospitals recording hundreds of new cases a week.

"Today the World Health Organisation (WHO) declares the end of the most recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Liberia and says all known chains of transmission have been stopped in West Africa," the United Nations health agency announced in Geneva.

UN chief Ban Ki-moon has warned the region can expect sporadic cases in the coming year, but added "we also expect the potential and frequency of those flare-ups to decrease over time".

"The end of Ebola transmission in West Africa is testament to what we can achieve when multilateralism works as it should, bringing the international community to work alongside national governments in caring for their people," he told a General Assembly briefing on Wednesday. "Let us pledge to maintain our vigilance, our commitment and our solidarity for the people of west Africa and our world."

http://www.bdlive.co.za/africa/africannews/2016/01/14/ebola-epidemic-officially-declared-over
 

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South Africa is first middle-income country to fund impact bonds for early childhood development

March 18 was an historic day for early childhood development (ECD) financing—the Departments of Social Development and Health of the Western Cape province of South Africa committed 25 million rand ($1.62 million) in outcome funding for three social impact bonds (SIBs) for maternal and early childhood outcomes. This is the first ever funding committed by a middle-income government for a SIB—to date no low-income country governments have participated in a SIB either—making South Africa’s choice to pioneer this new path especially exciting.

A SIB is a financing mechanism for social outcomes where investors provide upfront capital for services and a government agency repays investors contingent on outcome achievement. There are currently two active development impact bonds or DIBs (where a donor provides outcome funding rather than a government agency) in middle-income countries, one for coffee production in Peru and one for girls’ education in India. The South African SIBs, whose implementation was facilitated by the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the University of Cape Town and Social Finance U.K. as well as other organizations, will be the first impact bonds in Africa.

http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/education-plus-development/posts/2016/04/05-south-africa-impact-bonds
 

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Six African nations could be malaria-free by 2020: WHO


Six countries in Africa, the continent where malaria is most widespread, could be free of the disease by 2020, according to a WHO report published Monday to mark World Malaria Day.

One of the goals of the World Health Organization's 2016-2030 programme against malaria is to wipe out the disease in at least 10 countries by the end of this decade.

"WHO estimates that 21 countries are in a position to achieve this goal, including six countries in the African Region, where the burden of the disease is heaviest," the Geneva-based organisation said in a statement.

These countries are Algeria, Botswana, Cape Verde, Comoros, South Africa and Swaziland.

In South Africa the elimination of malaria is a public health objective. The country registered 11,700 cases of the disease in 2014 -- down from 64,000 in 2000 -- with most diagnoses coming from areas bordering Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

"Through targeted action and cross-border collaboration, South Africa has the potential to eliminate malaria by 2020," the WHO report said.

The other countries the organisation believes could achieve this objective are China, Malaysia and South Korea, eight Latin American nations (Costa Rica, Belize, El Salvador, Mexico, Argentina, Paraguay, Ecuador and Suriname), as well as Saudi Arabia, Iran, Oman, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Timor-Leste and Nepal.

Europe, Central Asia and the Caucasus eradicated malaria in 2015, according to a WHO report published earlier this month.

Some 214 million people suffered from malaria last year of which 438,000 died from the disease, according to the organisation.

Nine out of 10 deaths from the disease in 2015 came from sub-Saharan Africa, the report said.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/afp/article-3557085/Six-African-nations-malaria-free-2020-WHO.html
 

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Kenya aims to reduce malaria deaths by 30% over the next year

The UN marked World Malaria Day on Monday, and while there have been several inroads made to fight Africa's biggest killer, much more needs to be done. In Kenya, scientists are doing their part to reduce the rate of malaria.
 

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Urine test kit to help beat malaria

It's now possible to test for malaria using urine instead of blood samples. The Nigerian health ministry has been encouraging people to use a new testing technology that uses urine samples to give quick diagnosis of clinical malaria.
 

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Yellow fever outbreak in DRC and Angola could spread: WHO warns

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has raised concerns over the likelihood of the Yellow fever outbreak in Angola that has killed nearly 300 people spreading to neighbouring countries.

CONGO DRC-Yellow fever outbreak in DR Congo alarms WHO high chance disease spreading to neighbouring countries. pic.twitter.com/GiXRKEW21c— Wish Fm (@Wishfmradio) May 8, 2016
 

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Chinese medical teams and Zanzibar island

The spice islands of East Africa. Zanzibar is famous for its spices and its architecture. To residents on the main island, however, one group of Chinese is well known to them - the Chinese medical team. For the past 51 years, many Chinese medical workers have set foot on this island. And the story is ongoing
 

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Hospitals in Angola overwhelmed as Yellow Fever outbreak continues

Angola's public healthcare system is overwhelmed by the number of yellow fever cases, though the outbreak has lessened, there are reports of patients having to carry their own latex gloves and dressings in order to receive treatment. Health officials say the situation is dire
 

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Drones to help deliver medical supplies in Rwanda

Rwanda is about to become the first country in the world to use drones to deliver medical supplies. It's teamed up with an American company for the venture. The first deliveries are due begin in the next few months. CCTV's Michael Baleke has that report.
 

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Hospitals in Angola overwhelmed as Yellow Fever outbreak continues

Angola's public healthcare system is overwhelmed by the number of yellow fever cases, though the outbreak has lessened, there are reports of patients having to carry their own latex gloves and dressings in order to receive treatment. Health officials say the situation is dire
Corruption. They announced a $6 billion investment.. Few months after we have this ^^ . Lots of people dying, lack of doctors ... :cripes:
 

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Uganda stepping up efforts to fight Yellow Fever outbreak in the country

Uganda is stepping up efforts to fight a yellow fever outbreak. Seven people have died so far. But a vaccination programme and awareness campaign are helping save lives. CCTV's Hillary Ayesiga reports.
 
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