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Rekordvizemeister
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^^ Mind demographics too. Europe has a very small population, with only several middle size countries.

France, Germany, Benelux and UK together have about 230 million inhabitants on an area of 460,000 square miles. This is one of the most densely populated areas of the earth. The distances between the four largest airports in this area (LHR, CDG, FRA, AMS) are in no case further than 400 miles, which is not a worthwhile distance for an aircraft. The well-developed road and rail network handles most of the traffic in this part of the world.
 

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Can't believe Beijing Capital topped 8.593 million in march. If annualised, that means 104 million pax in a year.
 

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The fight for the 2nd busiest European aiport:

CDG 69.950.683
AMS 69.438.343
IST 67.034.875

Looks like AMS will surpass CDG later on this year, but IST may end up surpassing both airports by the end of the year.
Very easy, IST is not part of Europe
 

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Usuario
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Great analysis, as always Bubbalo!

It's very interesting to see that, despite fantastic growths in China, India and other countries in the last decades, USA still represents almost one quarter of the total World traffic. China has a long way yet before it reaches the US and India the same with respect to China.
 

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The fight for the 2nd busiest European aiport:

CDG 69.950.683
AMS 69.438.343
IST 67.034.875

Looks like AMS will surpass CDG later on this year, but IST may end up surpassing both airports by the end of the year.
That's some rather irrelevant statistics. Istanbul is not a European city. It's an Islamic city of the Middle East. If anything, Tel Aviv would have more ground to be included among European cities.

As for Amsterdam, it has only 1 airport, whereas Paris has 3 airports, so this comparison makes little sense. Traffic at the Paris airports is vastly larger than at Amsterdam's single airport. In 2017 there were 105,232,285 passengers at the Paris airports, vs only 68,515,425 at Amsterdam airport. The two cities are really not in the same league.
 

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It may take a few years but I wouldn't be surprised if IST becomes the busiest airport in Europe. 2020?
 

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Indian domestic traffic up a remarkable 26.4% in Apr-2018, 44th month of double digit growth


New Delhi - Strong economic and network expansion lifted India's domestic passenger traffic in April, a global airline association said on Thursday.

According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), India's domestic demand measured in revenue passenger kilometres (RPK) was the highest amongst major aviation markets like Australia, Brazil, China, Japan, Russia and the United States.

As per the data, India's domestic RPK in the month under review rose by 26.4% in April compared to the corresponding month of the previous year.

"India's airlines recorded double-digit annual growth for the 44th consecutive month, with passenger demand continuing to be supported by a combination of strong economic and network expansion," IATA said in its global passenger traffic results for April 2018.

India's domestic passenger traffic growth was followed by that of China at 15.5% and Russian Federation and Brazil at 6.7% each.
 

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London and Tokyo being on islands gives them extra passenger boost. Also cities without long distance high speed rail connections have relatively more busy airports.

For example Paris would be very close to London if it was located on an island or didn't have the high speed rail network.
Exactly!

Another factor is the particular location of a city in terms of weather and scenic areas. Take Manchester and Milan. If people from Manchester want to reach sunny beaches, they have to fly to Spain. People from Milan, on the other hand, just drive to Liguria or Rimini. So that artificially inflates the passenger air traffic of Manchester compared to Milan.

I think the only way to check the actual economic importance of a city by air traffic is if we count the passenger traffic only to areas that are more than 4,000 km away. 4,000 km is the distance between London and the beaches of Hurghada (Egypt) on the Red Sea, and it's also the distance between NYC and LA. That way we remove all casual getaway trips to sunny/scenic areas, and also most of the domestic traffic in large countries like US or China.

Of course it would be complicated to make such calculations. Maybe Bubbalo could try?

A list with air traffic only to 4,000+ km destinations would be greatly different. Cities like Atlanta, Beijing, Shanghai, Jakarta, Bangkok, Istanbul would drop from the radar, while the dominance of NYC, London, and Paris would be very obvious. Amsterdam, Frankfurt, LA would also appear quite visibly as the international nodes they are.

This is 4,000 km from NYC, London, Dubai, and Beijing for example.



I have data for the main European air hubs.

This was total passenger air traffic in 2016:
- London: 163,189,513
- Paris: 101,085,907
- Amsterdam: 63,549,632
- Frankfurt: 60,668,733

And this was passenger air traffic only to/from locations more than 4,000 km away in 2016:
- London: 44,197,945
- Paris: 29,326,671
- Frankfurt: 20,830,761
- Amsterdam: 17,129,936

Of course cultural factors can also interfere with these data, which do not strictly reflect economic dominance. For example in the case of London, a lot of this 4,000+ km traffic is due to strong ties with US/Canada for historical and cultural reasons.

If we remove US/Canada then we get this:

Passenger air traffic to/from locations more than 4,000 km away except to/from US/Canada:
- London: 24,068,478
- Paris: 20,478,902
- Frankfurt: 12,643,708
- Amsterdam: 10,919,852

So what we can see is when we add up traffic to/from Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, Arabian peninsula, Indian subcontinent, East and South-East Asia, and Australia/South Pacific, Paris and London are very close to each other, and considerably ahead of Frankfurt and Amsterdam (with Frankfurt ahead of Amsterdam). London overdominates traffic to/from US/Canada due to historical and cultural factors. As for distances smaller than 4,000 km, geography, climate, high-speed rail largely explain the differences.

I also have data for the main US air hubs.

Total passenger air traffic in 2016:
- New York: 134,353,971
- Atlanta: 104,171,935
- Los Angeles: 102,630,641
- Chicago: 101,202,068
- Dallas: 81,233,435
- SF Bay Area: 75,966,974
- Miami: 73,789,605

And this was passenger air traffic only to/from locations more than 4,000 km away in 2016:
- New York: 35,668,389 (31,228,773 without SF Bay Area and Sacramento, see below)
- Los Angeles: 20,923,826 (15,930,252 without Honolulu and Boston, see below)
- SF Bay Area: 16,979,866 (11,291,677 without New York, Philadelphia, and Miami, see below)
- Miami: 9,503,774 (8,726,177 without SF Bay Area, Sacramento, and Calgary, see below)
- Chicago: 8,395,480
- Atlanta: 5,405,820
- Dallas: 4,031,616

In the case of New York: Sacramento and the SF Bay Area lie just beyond the 4,000 km limit, which skews the data a bit. If we use a 4,200 km limit instead of 4,000, this changes almost nothing for the European air hubs, but in the case of New York its traffic goes from 35,668,389 to 31,228,773 (without SF, Sacramento, and a few minor areas).

In the case of LA: Honolulu and Boston lie just beyond the 4,000 km limit, which skews the data a bit. If we use a 4,200 km limit instead of 4,000, this changes almost nothing for the European air hubs, but in the case of LA its traffic goes from 20,923,826 to 15,930,252 (without Boston, Honolulu, and a few minor areas).

In the case of the SF Bay Area: New York, Philadelphia, and Miami lie just beyond the 4,000 km limit, which skews the data a bit. If we use a 4,200 km limit instead of 4,000, this changes almost nothing for the European air hubs, but in the case of SF Bay Area its traffic goes from 16,979,866 to 11,291,677 (without New York, Philadelphia, Miami, and a few minor areas).

In the case of Miami: the SF Bary Area, Sacramento, and Calgary lie just beyond the 4,000 km limit, which skews the data a bit. If we use a 4,200 km limit instead of 4,000, this changes almost nothing for the European air hubs, but in the case of Miami its traffic goes from 9,503,774 to 8,726,177 (without SF Bay Area, and Calgary).

So in summary, air passenger traffic to/from locations more than 4,200 km away in 2016:
- London: 44,183,220 (24,053,753 without US/Canada destinations/origins)
- New York: 31,228,773
- Paris: 29,060,498 (20,212,729 without US/Canada destinations/origins)
- Frankfurt: 20,678,521 (12,520,363 without US/Canada destinations/origins)
- Amsterdam: 17,076,766 (10,866,682 without US/Canada destinations/origins)
- Los Angeles: 15,930,252
- SF Bay Area: 11,291,677
- Miami: 8,726,177
- Chicago: 8,395,480
- Atlanta: 5,405,820
- Dallas: 4,031,616

I would be interesting to have similar figures for Dubai, Istanbul, Beijing, Shanghai, and Tokyo.
 

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It may take a few years but I wouldn't be surprised if IST becomes the busiest airport in Europe. 2020?
It is certainly possible, but unlikely as there are many risks that can hurt traffic at the new IST.

- Turkey is politically unstable
Depending on who you want to believe Turkey had 10's of thousands of civil servants who were a member of a terrorist organisation (FETO) or the government is making up that that's the case. Neither can be good for political stability.

- Many Europeans think increasingly unfavorable about Turkey, it's leadership and it's people.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2018/03/26/how-turkeys-outreach-to-its-diaspora-is-inflaming-tensions-with-europe/?utm_term=.780050b1c6cc

- Turkey is economically unstable
Much of the economic upturn has been financed by foreign debt, which is much harder to repay now that the Turkish Lira is in a massive downfall. https://www.ft.com/content/38f670ee-4317-11e8-97ce-ea0c2bf34a0b

- The company behind the new airport is already experiencing financial difficulties.
https://www.business-standard.com/article/international/financial-strain-seen-at-world-s-biggest-airport-in-istanbul-before-opening-118040301335_1.html
 

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It's not without red flags but they are in the sweet spot geographically to host a huge airport hub. Time will tell.
 

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