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Persian King of Kings
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
That wiki article is interesting but I prefer to call Shushtar Historical Hydraulic System, a UNESCO’s World Heritage site: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1315 as a Perso-Roman Wonder, of course it can be true to say some buildings, like the Band-e Kaisar, are the most eastern Roman civil engineering structure ever built, as mentioned in that article.

Anyway Romans and Persians worked together to build one of the greatest Hydraulic system in the world, there are several ancient bridges, dams, weirs, waterfalls, watermills, tunnels, canals, ... in Shushter, in the south of Iran. The ex-general secretary of UNESCO highly appreciated during his first visit to those watermills and called them as the first man-made industrial complex before industrial revolution.





































 

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Persian King of Kings
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Other pics of Roman tunnels and other buildings in Shushtar:

























 

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User
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spectacular!
I have a question: the roman (byzantine) bridge
of karamagara, in Turkey, of the 5th or 6th century, is maybe the most ancient known pointed arch bridge. It has been submerged after the building of a big dam in 1975.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karamagara_Bridge

(photo from wikipedia)

Does someone know something about the earliest examples of use of pointed arch in middle east or in Persia maybe? And about how it was adopted by architectural islamic tradition?
 

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Persian King of Kings
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
According to this book: http://books.google.com/books?id=MDEAAAAAMAAJ The earliest pointed arches were built by Sassanids in Persia but the Sassanid ponited arch was different from that built several hundred years later by the European architects. The Sassanid one was in the form of a semi-ellipse standing on its transverse axis, while the European pointed arch is two segments of a circle, which cut each other at the apex.

Lashgar Bridge in Shushtar (3rd century):

 

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Thanks Cyrus for the answer. If somebody is interested, I have found a brief article about the first uses of pointed arch in islamic tradition (wich is different from the sasanid one, having usually a cusp, but probably - or surely- derives from it), including hypothesis about its transmission to europe, so to gothic architecture. Here http://www.muslimheritage.com/topics/default.cfm?ArticleID=282 .
 

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Nangamuthuraj
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MARVELOUS , iF THE HISTORICAL GENESIS OF THE PLACE , IT WILL ADD MORE GLORY- PLEASE DON'T GIVE RELIGIOUS COLOUR TO THE WORK- IT IS IRANIAN /PERSIAN PRIDE-
 

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Persian King of Kings
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What turned them into ruins? When or why does a structure become unimportant?
There can be many reasons that some ancient buildings are ruined after hundreds years, especially these ones which could be confronted with the flood and other water-related hazards.

Of course some anicent buildings in Shushtar still work and are useful, like Mizan Weir:

 
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