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Yes

Go to the Tampa Delevelopment thread.....................
 

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Sad to say that there are only one tower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey if we get only 1 600' out of this I would be ecstatic..

I love that area of DT it is where I think we could go a lot higher as well in the future..
 

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As already said on the Tampa Thread, it's most likely good for the company to just build one and see what happens. They don't want to spend so much money on 2 towers and sales doesn't do good. They still have the other lot anyways, so anything can happen.
 

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Either way I hope it does not take two years for preconstruction.
 

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Tower might not scrape the sky

The developers need FAA approval to build 630 feet high because the proposed Tampa condo building is in the flight path of two airports.

By MICHAEL VAN SICKLER, Times Staff Writer
Published May 23, 2006

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TAMPA - Hold the ribbon-cutting ceremony for downtown's future tallest building.

It turns out the 630-foot-tall condo tower approved by the Tampa City Council last week is a tad taller than allowed by height limits meant to protect the flight paths of two nearby airports.

How much taller? Try 172 feet.

That could hurt the building's chances of becoming downtown's tallest by vaulting past the yet-to-be-built Trump Tower by 37 feet.

Because the building dubbed Tampa Condo II will be at Washington and Morgan streets on the southern edge of downtown, it'll be in the flight path of Peter O. Knight Airport, a scant 2 miles away on Davis Islands. It will also be about 6 miles from Tampa International Airport.

So even with the necessary zoning approval from the city, the project's Daytona Beach developers, Amon Investments, must seek approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to build a tower that tall.

How often does the FAA allow a building to exceed the cap? Nobody really knows here in Tampa because projects usually stay below the cap, said Nadine Jones, director of planning for the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority.

The 458-foot cap at the project's location isn't final, so the FAA could rule that it's okay to exceed it, said Tony Mantegna, deputy director of the county's aviation authority.

The height limit represents an estimate by local aviation officials of what is suitable for that location, he said. Developers could convince FAA officials that the 51-story tower won't pose a hazard, he said.

But neither Mantegna nor Jones could recall another project that got built at a height above its specific cap. Neither could Ed Cooley, senior director of operations and safety at TIA.

The company, Cooley said, "needs to go through the process, file paperwork with the FAA, and provide information to us so we can review it.''

Amon always intended to do that, said Ron Weaver, an attorney for the project. Developers decided to get city approval first, then try to get FAA approval later.

"It's a chicken or an egg thing,'' Weaver said.

An aviation consultant is analyzing flight patterns to determine if the condo tower would interfere with planes, Weaver said.

FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown said the agency has waived height restrictions for buildings, but she didn't know how often developers prevail.

Last year in downtown St. Petersburg, the developer of a condo tower had to reduce its height by 54 feet after the FAA said the building could affect 1 percent of the planes flying in and out of Albert Whitted Airport.

The tower, named after its address, 400 Beach Drive, had to be cut from 370 feet to 316 feet. Its developer, Opus South Corp. of Tampa, eliminated a penthouse.

In Tampa, if the FAA doesn't approve Amon's request, the project might be redrawn - again. When it was announced in December, two towers of 625 feet were planned for 472 units. The plan approved last week was for one building, but the same number of units.

The tower also would include 15,000 square feet of retail space. Condo prices would range from $300,000 to $2-million for the penthouse.

On the north side of downtown, meanwhile, a developer filed papers for a two-tower condo project at Zack Street and Nebraska Avenue.

Union Station Tampa, a Boca Raton company, is listed as the owner. It proposes to build one building at 24 stories and 390 feet with 498 units. The second building is proposed for 28 stories and 350 feet with 353 units.

Company officials couldn't be reached.

Times staff writers Erika Vidal and Steve Huettel contributed to this report. Michael Van Sickler can be reached at 813 226-3402 or [email protected]

[Last modified May 23, 2006, 08:51:27]
 

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Oh no..... the FAA strikes again. While I'll be rooting for them to allow this project to continue, I can't see them allowing it at this height.
 

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Quegiebo said:
Tower might not scrape the sky

The developers need FAA approval to build 630 feet high because the proposed Tampa condo building is in the flight path of two airports.

By MICHAEL VAN SICKLER, Times Staff Writer
Published May 23, 2006

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TAMPA - Hold the ribbon-cutting ceremony for downtown's future tallest building.

It turns out the 630-foot-tall condo tower approved by the Tampa City Council last week is a tad taller than allowed by height limits meant to protect the flight paths of two nearby airports.

How much taller? Try 172 feet.

That could hurt the building's chances of becoming downtown's tallest by vaulting past the yet-to-be-built Trump Tower by 37 feet.

Because the building dubbed Tampa Condo II will be at Washington and Morgan streets on the southern edge of downtown, it'll be in the flight path of Peter O. Knight Airport, a scant 2 miles away on Davis Islands. It will also be about 6 miles from Tampa International Airport.

So even with the necessary zoning approval from the city, the project's Daytona Beach developers, Amon Investments, must seek approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to build a tower that tall.

How often does the FAA allow a building to exceed the cap? Nobody really knows here in Tampa because projects usually stay below the cap, said Nadine Jones, director of planning for the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority.

The 458-foot cap at the project's location isn't final, so the FAA could rule that it's okay to exceed it, said Tony Mantegna, deputy director of the county's aviation authority.

The height limit represents an estimate by local aviation officials of what is suitable for that location, he said. Developers could convince FAA officials that the 51-story tower won't pose a hazard, he said.

But neither Mantegna nor Jones could recall another project that got built at a height above its specific cap. Neither could Ed Cooley, senior director of operations and safety at TIA.

The company, Cooley said, "needs to go through the process, file paperwork with the FAA, and provide information to us so we can review it.''

Amon always intended to do that, said Ron Weaver, an attorney for the project. Developers decided to get city approval first, then try to get FAA approval later.

"It's a chicken or an egg thing,'' Weaver said.

An aviation consultant is analyzing flight patterns to determine if the condo tower would interfere with planes, Weaver said.

FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown said the agency has waived height restrictions for buildings, but she didn't know how often developers prevail.

Last year in downtown St. Petersburg, the developer of a condo tower had to reduce its height by 54 feet after the FAA said the building could affect 1 percent of the planes flying in and out of Albert Whitted Airport.

The tower, named after its address, 400 Beach Drive, had to be cut from 370 feet to 316 feet. Its developer, Opus South Corp. of Tampa, eliminated a penthouse.

In Tampa, if the FAA doesn't approve Amon's request, the project might be redrawn - again. When it was announced in December, two towers of 625 feet were planned for 472 units. The plan approved last week was for one building, but the same number of units.

The tower also would include 15,000 square feet of retail space. Condo prices would range from $300,000 to $2-million for the penthouse.

On the north side of downtown, meanwhile, a developer filed papers for a two-tower condo project at Zack Street and Nebraska Avenue.

Union Station Tampa, a Boca Raton company, is listed as the owner. It proposes to build one building at 24 stories and 390 feet with 498 units. The second building is proposed for 28 stories and 350 feet with 353 units.

Company officials couldn't be reached.

Times staff writers Erika Vidal and Steve Huettel contributed to this report. Michael Van Sickler can be reached at 813 226-3402 or [email protected]

[Last modified May 23, 2006, 08:51:27]
D**n...D**n...D**n... :bash: I just knew it was too good to be true, but I am still keeping fingers crossed!!
 

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That would be total bullshit if the FAA single handidly killed this project. Does anyone actually fly 630 feet above the "CBD"? Amsouth is 3 blocks away and is only a 46 foot difference. Its times like these that makes me want to crush Peter O' Knight airport, if the project doesn't pass. :bash:
 

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FloridaFuture said:
That would be total bullshit if the FAA single handidly killed this project. Does anyone actually fly 630 feet above the "CBD"? Amsouth is 3 blocks away and is only a 46 foot difference. Its times like these that makes me want to crush Peter O' Knight airport, if the project doesn't pass. :bash:
Same thing I was thinking. FAA is just NIMBY'S that can come up with any excuse(aviation including) to f*** up another tower
 

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This was posted days ago... blech, old news.

Consider the source: The Times, who always put a negative spin on Tampa development. Furthermore, every project up for consideration has to go through this review. Whatever uncertainty about the completion of this project you may have shouldn't stem from this article, which is clearly biased, but from the fact that these are pricey units being developed by an unsure developer. This really shouldn't bother anyone - we know the FAA has to approve everything, and the disparity between the FAA limits and the actual height isn't ridiculous.
 

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^ This has been out for awhile. But like it says in the article...

"How often does the FAA allow a building to exceed the cap? Nobody really knows here in Tampa because projects usually stay below the cap, said Nadine Jones, director of planning for the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority. The 458-foot cap at the project's location isn't final, so the FAA could rule that it's okay to exceed it, said Tony Mantegna, deputy director of the county's aviation authority."

I don't think it's time to give up hope. At least Tampa now has proposed projects willing to challenge the cap. Sounds like the developer was well aware of this potential limit and has had intentions to get FAA review anyway. The fact that the neigboring buildings are almost the same height has to improve the chances of approval.
 

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Just like the FAA, but I would love to see them put the Tampa Tower more towards the NE of Downtown.
 

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Reaching new heights
Thursday, June 1, 2006


This is what the tower would look like.
The Tampa City Council will vote today on a plan to build a 630-foot tower in the heart of downtown.

The tower would not only be the Bay area's tallest building, it would also bring some tall changes to the entire downtown community.

"We're getting to be more of a livable city," urban design manager Wilson Stair said.

The Tampa downtown council reports 600 people called downtown home last year. However, so far, this year only 460 new housing units have been built there. Almost 2,300 more are under construction and 3,300 have been proposed.

"It's booming," mortgage broker associate Morgan Aponte said.

Almost 500 of those units would be at the corner of Washington and Morgan streets. The 51-story building would rise high above the neighboring Verizon and Bank of America buildings. Stair said it could quickly become a landmark.

"I think it's going to be a trend-setter in many ways and it gives us a benchmark for good architecture," Stair said.

It would also serve as a benchmark for residential downtown living.

Aponte said the project would help satisfy the soaring interest of people in the Bay area wanting to move to an urban setting.

"It's that ambiance that people are looking for," Aponte said. "They're looking for people to come back into the urban areas."

Aponte said while the prices of many of the proposed condos may be as steep as the buildings themselves, but people will still be lining up to buy them.

"The market is there," Aponte said. "It is there."

If final approval is granted, the first residents wouldn't move in for at least four years. Daytona beach-based developer Amon Investments is planning the tower. In addition to the condos, its plans include 15,000 square-feet of retail space and almost 900 parking spots.

http://www.baynews9.com/content/36/2006/6/1/161699.html
 

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I love the look of this building. Is it still set to breakground in 2008 or sooner?
 

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Interesting picture they put the rendering in, no? Looks circa 92, heh.

I like the rendering quite a bit. Flashy and dominating structure. :cheers:
 
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